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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Texas" +contributor:("Chen, Puh-Shih Daniel"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of North Texas

1. Jackson, Delores. Academic Self-efficacy of Adult First-generation Students Enrolled in Online Undergraduate Courses.

Degree: 2014, University of North Texas

This study examined differences between adult first-generation (AFG) and adult-continuing generation (ACG) students’ academic self-efficacy with regard to the online courses in which they were currently enrolled. The study used an online survey methodology to collect self-reported quantitative data from 1,768 undergraduate students enrolled in an online course at a mid-sized, four-year public university in the southwestern United States; 325 cases were usable for the study. The t-tests revealed no statistically significant differences between the academic self-efficacy of the AFG and ACG students. Parents’ level of educational attainment was unrelated to adult students’ academic self-efficacy with online courses. Ordinary least-squares analysis was used to evaluate student characteristics that might be associated with academic self-efficacy in the online environment. A combination of gender, GPA, age, race/ethnicity (White, Black, Hispanic, and other), and number of previous online courses predicted a statistically significant 12% of the variance in academic self-efficacy in an online environment (p < .001). Age (p < .001) and self-efficacy were positively correlated, meaning that adult students reported greater academic self-efficacy than did younger students; and number of previous online courses (p < .001) was also positively correlated to academic self-efficacy, indicating that students with greater experience with online courses reported a greater sense of academic self-efficacy in that environment than students who had completed fewer online courses. This study has implications of providing additional insight for higher education practitioners working with adult learners. Identifying additional factors influencing adult learners’ academic self-efficacy in an online academic environment may be useful when building effective strategies to improve online retention and completion rates for these students. Future research should examine a wider variety of variables beyond demographic characteristics. External and internal factors, along with existing theories of behaviors should be investigated to help explain adult persistence and retention online and in face-to-face courses. Advisors/Committee Members: Whitson, Kathleen Krebbs, 1947-, Bower, Beverly L., Chen, Puh-Shih Daniel.

Subjects/Keywords: adult learner; online college courses; adult-continuing generation students; Self-efficacy.; First-generation college students  – Psychology.; College students  – Psychology.; Distance education students  – Psychology.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jackson, D. (2014). Academic Self-efficacy of Adult First-generation Students Enrolled in Online Undergraduate Courses. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700075/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jackson, Delores. “Academic Self-efficacy of Adult First-generation Students Enrolled in Online Undergraduate Courses.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed April 02, 2020. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700075/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jackson, Delores. “Academic Self-efficacy of Adult First-generation Students Enrolled in Online Undergraduate Courses.” 2014. Web. 02 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Jackson D. Academic Self-efficacy of Adult First-generation Students Enrolled in Online Undergraduate Courses. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2014. [cited 2020 Apr 02]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700075/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jackson D. Academic Self-efficacy of Adult First-generation Students Enrolled in Online Undergraduate Courses. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2014. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700075/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Texas

2. Isbell, Teresa. The Relationship Between Institutional Expenditures and Student Completion of Momentum Points: a Community College Perspective.

Degree: 2014, University of North Texas

This study investigated the relationship between community college institutional expenditures and student success in reaching momentum points. The 3 years of student cohorts of a large community college district in Texas formed the population. Student characteristics and institutional context characteristics served as control variables. Institutional financial data functioned as the independent variables. Student success variables (milestones and momentum points) served as dependent variables. Because each of the three cohorts contained over 10,000 students and displayed equivalent characteristics, the random sample of 7,634 students was drawn from the combined cohorts. Institutional financial variables predicted the milestones of reading readiness (χ2 = 315.10, df = 17, n = 3,495, p < .001) and writing readiness (χ2 = 296.64, df = 17, n = 3,149, p < .001). Financial variables contributed to the completion of English-1301 (χ2 = 1004.14, df = 17, n = 7,634, p < .001), college-level math (χ2 = 615.24, df = 17, n = 7,634, p < .001), 30 college-level credit hours (χ2 = 833.85, df = 17, n = 7,634, p < .001), and reenrollment the second fall semester (χ2 = 375.41, df = 17, n = 7,634, p < .001). Student services expenditures provided high odds for completion of English-1301 (odds ratio = 4.85 x 1014), college-level math (odds ratio = 5.24 x 1018), 30 college-level credits (odds ratio = 1.60x1015), and for re-enrollment in the second fall semester (odds ratio = 7.32 x 1014). Instructional expenditures and operations & maintenance expenditures also predicted student enrollment in the second fall semester. Student services’ influence on student engagement and success should inform decisions about programs for improving student success. Institutional policymakers may utilized these expenditure results support momentum point attainment. Finally, the influence of full time enrollment on student completion of milestones and momentum points in every regression model suggested resources for encouraging full-time, uninterrupted college enrollment are needed. Additional implications and recommendations are provided. Advisors/Committee Members: Bower, Beverly L., Chen, Puh-Shih Daniel, Borcoman, Gabriela.

Subjects/Keywords: student outcomes; institutional effectiveness; accountability; Community colleges  – Texas  – Finance.; Community college students  – Texas.; Community college students  – Services for  – Texas.; Academic achievement  – Texas.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Isbell, T. (2014). The Relationship Between Institutional Expenditures and Student Completion of Momentum Points: a Community College Perspective. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700068/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Isbell, Teresa. “The Relationship Between Institutional Expenditures and Student Completion of Momentum Points: a Community College Perspective.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed April 02, 2020. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700068/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Isbell, Teresa. “The Relationship Between Institutional Expenditures and Student Completion of Momentum Points: a Community College Perspective.” 2014. Web. 02 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Isbell T. The Relationship Between Institutional Expenditures and Student Completion of Momentum Points: a Community College Perspective. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2014. [cited 2020 Apr 02]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700068/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Isbell T. The Relationship Between Institutional Expenditures and Student Completion of Momentum Points: a Community College Perspective. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2014. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc700068/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.