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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Texas" +contributor:("Atkins, Deborah H."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of North Texas

1. Hare, Addie Y. V. McGriff. Revealing What Urban Early Childhood Teachers Think About Mathematics and How They Teach It: Implications for Practice.

Degree: 1999, University of North Texas

Hersh (1986) states, "One's conception of what mathematics is affects one's conception of how it should be presented. One's manner of presenting it is an indication of what one believes to be most essential in it." In this research study, three hundred ninety-seven urban early childhood teachers were given a survey that examined their attitudes toward mathematics and mathematics teaching, their views of mathematics, views of teaching mathematics, and views of children learning mathematics. The purpose of this study was to identify the attitudes and beliefs of early childhood teachers in two urban school districts to determine if mathematics reform efforts made a difference in teachers' attitudes and beliefs about mathematics and its teaching. Questionnaires were mailed directly to teachers in one school district and principals distributed questionnaires in the other. Summary scores were calculated for parts of the instrument. The researcher performed descriptive statistics, comparative analysis, and conducted frequency distributions, t-tests, ANOVA, and Pearson Correlations. Findings revealed that teachers with 30 or more years of teaching experience had more positive attitudes toward mathematics than teachers with 1-3 years of experience. African American teachers had more positive attitudes toward mathematics and its teaching than other ethnic groups. Teachers who held a minor or major in mathematics had more positive attitudes toward mathematics and its teaching than teachers without a minor or major in mathematics. Teachers in District-A favored constructivist learning while teachers in District-B favored rote learning. Both school districts' teachers favored the problem-solving approach to teaching mathematics. If instruction is to be transformed, reformers need to understand teachers' beliefs about mathematics. Beliefs, which are essential for teachers' development, seldom change without significant intervention (Lappan and Theule-Lubienski, 1994). Therefore, school districts must be informed about the changes necessary for the reform of mathematics teaching and identify and implement through staff developments and other measures what they perceive mathematics to be and how it should be taught. Advisors/Committee Members: Morrison, George S., Schertz, Linda, Sullivan, Allen, Atkins, Deborah H..

Subjects/Keywords: Mathematics  – Study and teaching (Early childhood).; Early childhood teachers  – Attitudes.; early childhood; mathematics education; attitudes and beliefs

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hare, A. Y. V. M. (1999). Revealing What Urban Early Childhood Teachers Think About Mathematics and How They Teach It: Implications for Practice. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2437/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hare, Addie Y V McGriff. “Revealing What Urban Early Childhood Teachers Think About Mathematics and How They Teach It: Implications for Practice.” 1999. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 22, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2437/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hare, Addie Y V McGriff. “Revealing What Urban Early Childhood Teachers Think About Mathematics and How They Teach It: Implications for Practice.” 1999. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hare AYVM. Revealing What Urban Early Childhood Teachers Think About Mathematics and How They Teach It: Implications for Practice. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 1999. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2437/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hare AYVM. Revealing What Urban Early Childhood Teachers Think About Mathematics and How They Teach It: Implications for Practice. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 1999. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2437/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Texas

2. Bennett, Tisha L. Teachers' Use of Children's Literature, Mathematics Manipulatives, and Scaffolding to Improve Preschool Mathematics Achievement: Does It Work?.

Degree: 2000, University of North Texas

The primary purpose of this study was to determine if the implementation of an intervention involving teachers' use of children's literature, related storybook manipulatives, and a scaffolding (LMS) approach to learning would improve preschool children's mathematics test scores. Additionally, the LMS approach was examined to determine whether teachers' perceptions of their effectiveness in mathematics instruction changed from the beginning to the end of the study. The subjects of the study included 60 preschool-aged children and six teachers from two child care centers. The preschool teachers participated in either a control or experimental condition (the LMS approach) in their daily mathematics instruction with their preschool children. The researcher tested the children using the Test of Early Mathematics Ability and an abbreviated version of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale. The study was based on two main research questions. The first question asked if there was a difference in the Test of Early Mathematics Ability total posttest scores between children in the literature-manipulatives-scaffolding intervention group and children in the control group after assuring equivalency of the two groups. The second question addressed if preschool teachers believed they were more effective in their mathematics instruction after implementing the LMS approach with young children. The answer to the first research question was that there was no statistically significant difference in the Test of Early Mathematics Ability total posttest scores between children in the literature-manipulatives-scaffolding group and children in the control group. However, the answer to the second question was that preschool teachers believed they were more effective in their mathematics instruction after implementing the LMS approach with young children. Recommendations for future research on early childhood mathematics include the investigation of preschool children's ability, achievement, and interest in mathematics; teachers' use of mathematics scaffolding techniques; and longitudinal mathematics interventions beginning during the preschool years. Advisors/Committee Members: Morrison, George S., Hildreth, Bertina, Daniel, Larry G., Atkins, Deborah H., Schertz, Linda.

Subjects/Keywords: Mathematics  – Study and teaching (Preschool); children's literature; mathematics manipulatives; preschool; mathematics achievement; scaffolding

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bennett, T. L. (2000). Teachers' Use of Children's Literature, Mathematics Manipulatives, and Scaffolding to Improve Preschool Mathematics Achievement: Does It Work?. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2733/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bennett, Tisha L. “Teachers' Use of Children's Literature, Mathematics Manipulatives, and Scaffolding to Improve Preschool Mathematics Achievement: Does It Work?.” 2000. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 22, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2733/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bennett, Tisha L. “Teachers' Use of Children's Literature, Mathematics Manipulatives, and Scaffolding to Improve Preschool Mathematics Achievement: Does It Work?.” 2000. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bennett TL. Teachers' Use of Children's Literature, Mathematics Manipulatives, and Scaffolding to Improve Preschool Mathematics Achievement: Does It Work?. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2000. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2733/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bennett TL. Teachers' Use of Children's Literature, Mathematics Manipulatives, and Scaffolding to Improve Preschool Mathematics Achievement: Does It Work?. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2000. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2733/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Texas

3. Castro, R. Raquel. From Theory to Practice: A First Look at Success for Life - A Brain Research-Based Early Childhood Program.

Degree: 1998, University of North Texas

Success For Life (SFL) is a brain research-based program for children, birth through age six. This research examined the development and implementation of SFL in 13 early childhood settings. Participants were 24 female early childhood teachers and 146 (73 male) children. Teachers included seven infant, four toddler, nine preschool and four kindergarten teachers. Children included infants(n=29), toddlers(n=27), and prek/kindergartners (n=90). A Request for Proposals was disseminated to identify possible implementation sites. After participation was confirmed, teachers attended a full day's training which included a description of brain development/function, the latest brain research, how to implement SFL and other logistics of the study. Program implementation occurred over approximately four months. A field site coordinator visited each site bimonthly to provide on-going technical assistance. This was an intervention project with a pre and post implementation design. Four instruments were used: a teacher questionnaire, a classroom environment measure, a child measure and teacher journals. Results suggested that teachers became more knowledgeable about brain development research and about how children grow and learn. Teachers were better able to make connections between brain research findings and how to apply these findings to their programs and daily activities. Likewise, the environment measure indicated that teachers were better able to arrange environments for learning. They reported that children showed significant increases in skills development and performance in the following areas: physical mastery, social relations/interactions, cognitive development, and language/communications. Additionally, teachers reported improvements in emotional expression and well-being among infants and toddlers. Toddlers and preschoolers showed significant increases in creative/ artistic expression. Finally, teachers indicated that preschoolers showed increases in initiative, use of logic/mathematics skills, and musical coordination and movement. Research findings suggest that Success For Life is able to bridge the gap between theory and practice and benefits children, teachers and programs. Advisors/Committee Members: Morrison, George S., Schertz, Linda, Lundsteen, Sara W., Atkins, Deborah H..

Subjects/Keywords: Brain  – Research.; Child development.; Learning ability.; brain development; brain function; early childhood education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Castro, R. R. (1998). From Theory to Practice: A First Look at Success for Life - A Brain Research-Based Early Childhood Program. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc6153/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Castro, R Raquel. “From Theory to Practice: A First Look at Success for Life - A Brain Research-Based Early Childhood Program.” 1998. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 22, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc6153/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Castro, R Raquel. “From Theory to Practice: A First Look at Success for Life - A Brain Research-Based Early Childhood Program.” 1998. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Castro RR. From Theory to Practice: A First Look at Success for Life - A Brain Research-Based Early Childhood Program. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 1998. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc6153/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Castro RR. From Theory to Practice: A First Look at Success for Life - A Brain Research-Based Early Childhood Program. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 1998. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc6153/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.