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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Dakota" +contributor:("James Whitehead"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Dufner, Amanda. Motivations In Exercise.

Degree: MS, Kinesiology & Public Health Education, 2016, University of North Dakota

ABSTRACT College students exercise for a variety of reasons, but specific differences in their motivations and perceptions have not been extensively studied. PURPOSE: The main purpose was to see if students whose primary reason for exercise is to lose fat (FATCON), gain muscle mass (MUSC), or maintain health (HLTH) had differences in their exercise motivations, social physique anxiety, and body image self-perceptions. A secondary purpose was to explore if the participants’ supplement use reflected their exercise priorities. METHODS: Data were collected at a university Wellness Center, or from exercise classes. Participants (N = 216) completed a packet of four questionnaires: Multidimensional Body Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ), Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS), The Behavioral Regulation of Exercise Questionnaire (BREQ-3), and an ad hoc Dietary Supplement Questionnaire (DSQ). RESULTS: MANOVA revealed a significant difference between groups (F (14, 350) = 4.89, p < .001). Post hoc tests showed significant differences between groups on six out of seven dependent variable scales. Specifically, MUSC was significantly higher in autonomous motivation than FATCON and HLTH (p < .001), but FATCON scores on SPAS, appearance evaluation, body areas satisfaction, overweight preoccupation, and self-weight classification were all less positive than the scores of MUSC and HLTH (p < .001 to p < .005). Supplement use was low in HLTH (11%), FATCON (15%), but higher in MUSC (49%). In addition, some of the supplements listed by MUSC were of questionable efficacy and safety. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of these college student exercisers were autonomously motivated, but those who exercised primarily for fat control had more negative body-related perceptions than those who exercised primarily for health, or for muscle gain reasons. Additionally, the data on supplement use indicates a need for consumer education, especially for those who report they are exercising primarily to gain muscle. Advisors/Committee Members: James Whitehead.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dufner, A. (2016). Motivations In Exercise. (Masters Thesis). University of North Dakota. Retrieved from https://commons.und.edu/theses/2010

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dufner, Amanda. “Motivations In Exercise.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of North Dakota. Accessed December 09, 2019. https://commons.und.edu/theses/2010.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dufner, Amanda. “Motivations In Exercise.” 2016. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Dufner A. Motivations In Exercise. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/2010.

Council of Science Editors:

Dufner A. Motivations In Exercise. [Masters Thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2016. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/2010

2. Zachman, Kelsey Lauren. The Effects Of Resistance Training Programs On Physical Self-Perceptions In College Females.

Degree: MS, Kinesiology & Public Health Education, 2016, University of North Dakota

The effects of resistance training on females’ self-perception. Introduction: It is generally accepted that exercise enhances physical self-perceptions, but the impact of resistance training programs on females’ self-perceptions is unclear. Because exercise is an important public health behavior, and because physical self-perceptions have motivational implications, this study has potential to add knowledge that is relevant to exercise promotion. Purpose: The primary aim of the study was to explore the effect of two different types of resistance training programs on physical self-perceptions of college age females. Methods: Participants (n=30) were randomized to muscular strength, muscular endurance resistance training groups or a comparison group. Experimental resistance training groups followed a progressive resistance training program which consisted of three, one hour sessions per week for nine weeks. Participants completed the Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP) pre and post study to investigate the effects of physical self-perceptions after resistance training. Height, weight, skin folds and circumference measurements were taken pre- and post-test. Results: Results showed a significant difference between groups on sum of skinfolds (p =0.013). The pairwise comparison indicates that strength was different from endurance (p =0.013). PSPP differences were only indicated for the physical condition subscale (p =0.004). Strength competence subscale (p = 0.015) and the attractive body adequacy subscale (p = 0.018) were trending and may be practically significant. Discussion: Resistance training improved females’ physical self-perception. The post hoc comparisons indicate that only the strength group was different from the comparison and no differences existed between endurance and either group. Advisors/Committee Members: James Whitehead.

Subjects/Keywords: College Females; Physical Self-Perceptions; Resistance Training

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zachman, K. L. (2016). The Effects Of Resistance Training Programs On Physical Self-Perceptions In College Females. (Masters Thesis). University of North Dakota. Retrieved from https://commons.und.edu/theses/2091

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zachman, Kelsey Lauren. “The Effects Of Resistance Training Programs On Physical Self-Perceptions In College Females.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of North Dakota. Accessed December 09, 2019. https://commons.und.edu/theses/2091.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zachman, Kelsey Lauren. “The Effects Of Resistance Training Programs On Physical Self-Perceptions In College Females.” 2016. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Zachman KL. The Effects Of Resistance Training Programs On Physical Self-Perceptions In College Females. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/2091.

Council of Science Editors:

Zachman KL. The Effects Of Resistance Training Programs On Physical Self-Perceptions In College Females. [Masters Thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2016. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/2091

3. Akowuah, Emmanuel Afawuah. Promoting Self-Determined Motivation For Exercise In Stroke Rehabilitation: The Role Of Autonomy Support.

Degree: MS, Kinesiology & Public Health Education, 2014, University of North Dakota

Rehabilitation Interventionists (RIs) usually spend a great deal of time and effort trying to improve the functional abilities of stroke patients. Stroke rehabilitation through current studies has been recognized as an important and effective modality in the treatment of stroke. Despite the known benefits of SR to stroke patients, a number of them drop out resulting in a decline the benefits from the program. Objective: To examine the predictive relationship between perceived autonomy support provided by Stroke Rehabilitation Interventionists, and the participants' subsequent stroke rehabilitation program attendance rate. The study also examines the predictive relationship between participants' perceived autonomy support and their motivation to exercise, which in turn, would predict higher stroke rehabilitation program attendance rate. Research Method: Stroke rehabilitation outpatients (N = 35; Male = 20; Female = 15; Mage = 52.79 years: SD = 12.16). This study examined the predictive relationship between participants' perceived autonomy support and motivation for exercise at weeks 2 and 3 of stroke rehabilitation participation. It also examined the predictive relationship between participants' perceived autonomy support and stroke rehabilitation attendance rate. Stroke rehabilitation attendance was tracked for a period of 5 weeks. Descriptive statistics, bivariate correlations and hierarchical linear regression were calculated to assess the predictive relationships between perceived autonomy support, self-determined motivation and stroke rehabilitation program attendance rate. Results: Perceived autonomy support was not positively correlated with relative autonomy index, r(35) = .13, p > .05. The relationship between perceived autonomy support and all other forms of controlled motivation was also not significant. The regression model predicting program attendance showed significant positive effect for perceived autonomy support (β = .56, R2 = .32, p < .001). However, the regression model predicting program attendance showed a non-significant effect for self-determined motivation (β = .56, R2 = .32, p = NS). Conclusion: Results supports Self-Determination Theory in predicting the attendance rate of participants in SR. The higher the perceived autonomy support provided by RI to stroke patients, the higher their attendance rate in a stroke rehabilitation program. RIs supporting stroke patients' autonomy support rather than interfering with their autonomy or neglecting them during the SR process helps create an environment where stroke patients can feel an engagement-fostering balance between what they want to do and what they are actually told to do. Advisors/Committee Members: James Whitehead.

Subjects/Keywords: Motivation for Exercise; Perceived Autonomy Support; Stroke rehabilitation; Stroke Rehabilitation and Perceived Autonomy Support

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Akowuah, E. A. (2014). Promoting Self-Determined Motivation For Exercise In Stroke Rehabilitation: The Role Of Autonomy Support. (Masters Thesis). University of North Dakota. Retrieved from https://commons.und.edu/theses/1611

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Akowuah, Emmanuel Afawuah. “Promoting Self-Determined Motivation For Exercise In Stroke Rehabilitation: The Role Of Autonomy Support.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of North Dakota. Accessed December 09, 2019. https://commons.und.edu/theses/1611.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Akowuah, Emmanuel Afawuah. “Promoting Self-Determined Motivation For Exercise In Stroke Rehabilitation: The Role Of Autonomy Support.” 2014. Web. 09 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Akowuah EA. Promoting Self-Determined Motivation For Exercise In Stroke Rehabilitation: The Role Of Autonomy Support. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 09]. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1611.

Council of Science Editors:

Akowuah EA. Promoting Self-Determined Motivation For Exercise In Stroke Rehabilitation: The Role Of Autonomy Support. [Masters Thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2014. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1611

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