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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Dakota" +contributor:("David H. Whitcomb"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Giordano, Nicole Gigi. Concealing Stigmatized Sexual Orientation, Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Attitudes, And Ego Depletion.

Degree: PhD, Counseling Psychology & Community Services, 2016, University of North Dakota

The current study was designed with the aim of increasing the understanding of how concealing or disclosing a stigmatized sexual identity to a perceived accepting/non- accepting person affects ego depletion. Ego Depletion, (Baumeister, 1998) refers to the idea that certain tasks exhaust a limited pool of cognitive resources. Previous literature has explored how concealing a stigmatized identity is ego depleting; however, an examination of the relationship between ego depletion and the concealment of the specific identity as a sexual minority has not yet been explored. LGBQ individuals are often faced with the challenge of navigating social situations to determine if they are comfortable disclosing their sexual orientation. The present study sought to address gaps in the literature on LGBQ coming out (concealing and disclosing sexual orientation), and more specifically, using an experimental design, this study explored how the exposure to accepting or non-accepting attitudes affected psychological functioning (ego depletion) and anxiety. Participants (N = 144) completed an online survey during which they were presented with a scenario in which a fictional partner had an accepting versus non- accepting attitude. LGBQ participants chose to conceal or disclose their sexual identity, and then completed a measure of ego depletion. Statistical analysis showed a statistically significant interaction between the Acceptance (positive-accepting attitudes versus negative-non-accepting attitudes) and Conceal/Disclose Group (Choice Disclose versus Choice Conceal versus Instructed Concealing). The results of this study have significant implications for the LGBQ community as a whole, and the profound clinical implications as well as potential areas of future research are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: David H. Whitcomb.

Subjects/Keywords: Coming Out; Ego Depletion; LGBTQ; Stigma

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Giordano, N. G. (2016). Concealing Stigmatized Sexual Orientation, Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Attitudes, And Ego Depletion. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of North Dakota. Retrieved from https://commons.und.edu/theses/2020

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Giordano, Nicole Gigi. “Concealing Stigmatized Sexual Orientation, Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Attitudes, And Ego Depletion.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of North Dakota. Accessed February 20, 2020. https://commons.und.edu/theses/2020.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Giordano, Nicole Gigi. “Concealing Stigmatized Sexual Orientation, Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Attitudes, And Ego Depletion.” 2016. Web. 20 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Giordano NG. Concealing Stigmatized Sexual Orientation, Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Attitudes, And Ego Depletion. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of North Dakota; 2016. [cited 2020 Feb 20]. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/2020.

Council of Science Editors:

Giordano NG. Concealing Stigmatized Sexual Orientation, Accepting Versus Non-Accepting Attitudes, And Ego Depletion. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of North Dakota; 2016. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/2020

2. Jorgensen, Kimberly Marie. Multisexual Identities And Mental Health: Mitigating Factors Of Minority Stress.

Degree: PhD, Counseling Psychology & Community Services, 2012, University of North Dakota

Much of the current literature about sexual minorities examines the experiences of lesbian- and gay-identified individuals. The current study was designed to facilitate increased understanding of sexuality for people who have multi-gendered attractions and sexual identities (e.g., bisexual, queer). This work extends beyond discrete binary categories and labels for sexual orientation, such as straight, gay, and lesbian. In the current examination of this expanded category, labeled as multisexual, it becomes important to shift not only the conceptualization of sexual orientation but also the nature of minority stress, from examining homophobia and heterosexism, to biphobia and monosexism. Under circumstances when an individual may have very little control over the stressor, such as prejudicial attitudes and discrimination, there is research to suggest that emotion-focused coping (specifically forgiveness) mitigates harmful mental health outcomes. The current study sought to address gaps in the current literature on LGB identities, including clearly assessing sexual identity, increased specificity in defining the population of study, and examining multidimensional relationships between variables (Diamond, 2003a). This study sought to estimate the fit of self-report data to a model of minority stress adapted from Meyer (2003), examining the interplay of minority stress, coping, and consequent health outcomes of people who are identify between and beyond the heterosexual and homosexual. Additionally, the study examined the ability of forgiveness and other styles of coping, including individual and LGBTQ community social support, to mitigate the expected negative association between minority stress and mental health and well-being. Participants (N = 207) identified with labels that embrace a more fluid concept of emotional, romantic, or sexual relationships (e.g., bisexual, pansexual, omnisexual, PoMoSexual, questioning, unlabeled) and provided self-report data online. While the observed data did not provide a strong statistical fit with the hypothesized model of minority stress (Meyer, 2003), supplementary multiple regression analyses suggested a unique contribution of forgiveness in mitigating the detrimental relationship between oppression-related stress and mental health and well-being. The results of this study have significant implications for the intentional coping strategies of multisexual people and for mental health counselors providing such interventions. Implications for theory, research, and clinical practice are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: David H. Whitcomb.

Subjects/Keywords: bisexual; forgiveness; minority stress; multisexual

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jorgensen, K. M. (2012). Multisexual Identities And Mental Health: Mitigating Factors Of Minority Stress. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of North Dakota. Retrieved from https://commons.und.edu/theses/1356

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jorgensen, Kimberly Marie. “Multisexual Identities And Mental Health: Mitigating Factors Of Minority Stress.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of North Dakota. Accessed February 20, 2020. https://commons.und.edu/theses/1356.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jorgensen, Kimberly Marie. “Multisexual Identities And Mental Health: Mitigating Factors Of Minority Stress.” 2012. Web. 20 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Jorgensen KM. Multisexual Identities And Mental Health: Mitigating Factors Of Minority Stress. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of North Dakota; 2012. [cited 2020 Feb 20]. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1356.

Council of Science Editors:

Jorgensen KM. Multisexual Identities And Mental Health: Mitigating Factors Of Minority Stress. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of North Dakota; 2012. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1356

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