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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Dakota" +contributor:("Brian M. Tande"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Onken, Andrew Garrett. Development Of A High Strength Laminate Repair System.

Degree: MS, Chemical Engineering, 2012, University of North Dakota

Composite manufacturing often requires repairs at some point during the life of the part. Working with LM Wind Power, the Chemical and Mechanical Engineering Departments at the University of North Dakota worked to develop a new laminate repair system to be used in composite repairs. Both chemical and mechanical test methods were explored to analyze various resins in an attempt to increase the interface toughness between the parent laminate and repair laminate. A total of six resins from four suppliers were tested. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical rheological testing were performed to analyze the curing kinetics of each resin tested. Static double cantilever beam and tension-tension fatigue tests were performed to measure the mechanical performance of each resin. All specimens were prepared to mimic that of a large-scale wind turbine blade. Each resin tested was compared to the current repair resin system to determine which choice was best to meet the requirements set for by LM Wind Power for repair laminate improvement. The results indicated that toughened resin performance is superior to that of the current resin system. Along with the analysis of new repair resins, an initiator study was performed. The initiator study was done on the blade resin used for vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). Four initiators were tested and compared to the current initiator. Methods included differential scanning calorimetry and rheology. The goal with testing these initiators was to see if changing the initiator would increase the working time while decreasing the overall curing time. To achieve this, the initial viscosity of the resin needed to remain low to ensure a full wet out of the part and once wet out was complete a sharp increase in viscosity would indicate a fast cure. Of the initiators tested, Pulcat from Syrgis Performance Initiators performed better than the others. However, without testing it in production, it is unclear whether or not it is superior to the current initiator MCP-75. Advisors/Committee Members: Brian M. Tande.

Subjects/Keywords: Composites; Laminates; Repair

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Onken, A. G. (2012). Development Of A High Strength Laminate Repair System. (Masters Thesis). University of North Dakota. Retrieved from https://commons.und.edu/theses/1310

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Onken, Andrew Garrett. “Development Of A High Strength Laminate Repair System.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of North Dakota. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://commons.und.edu/theses/1310.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Onken, Andrew Garrett. “Development Of A High Strength Laminate Repair System.” 2012. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Onken AG. Development Of A High Strength Laminate Repair System. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1310.

Council of Science Editors:

Onken AG. Development Of A High Strength Laminate Repair System. [Masters Thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2012. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1310

2. Pesaran, Alireza. Application Of Composite Polymeric Membranes For Efficient Regeneration Of Physical Solvents.

Degree: MS, Chemical Engineering, 2013, University of North Dakota

The most dominant CO2 capture technology used for pre-combustion capture involves the application of physical solvents. Despite the low energy required to regenerate physical solvents and their high capacity for capturing and separating acid gases from the syngas produced in a gasification plant, physical solvents have some disadvantages including CO2 pressure loss and the energy required to pump the solvent to the high pressure absorber. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the use of composite polymeric membranes for the recovery of CO2 from CO2-rich solvent streams. To achieve this purpose, an experimental bench-scale setup was built to investigate and quantify CO2 removal capacity from the rich solvent across different types of membranes. Dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol (Selexol) is used as the solvent since it is reputed to be one of the major physical solvents for CO2 removal. To evaluate the effectiveness of different types of membranes, the CO2 permeation rate and membrane selectivity were measured for different membranes. The results of the screening study indicated that PDMS-based membranes (PERVATECH and PERVAP 4060) have higher CO2 permeability compared to PVOH-based membranes (PERVAP 1211 and PERVAP 1201). The best membrane for further analysis and experiments to find the optimum operational conditions was chosen as PEVAP 4060 from SULZER due to its high CO2 flux and selectivity compared to other membranes. Following a two-factor two -level full factorial design with two replicates an three center points, a statistical analysis was also performed to identify the significant factors for each individual response such as permeation rate, leak rate and selectivity. For CO2 flux, pressure appeared to be strongly significant. However, solvent flow rate had no significant effect on the rate of CO2 permeation. With respect to the solvent leak, the analysis of Pareto charts suggested pressure to be significant and solvent flow rate to be insignificant. Neither system pressure nor solvent flow rate found to be significant considering the selectivity as the experiment's response. Finally, regarding the percent recovery, both the system pressure and solvent flow rate appeared to be significant. In order to examine the chemical stability and structural integrity of the membranes after being exposed to the high pressure solvent, a series of post-experiment characteristic tests such as FTIR and DSC were performed. The results of these studies revealed no major changes. Advisors/Committee Members: Brian M. Tande.

Subjects/Keywords: CO2 capture; Composite Polymeric Membranes; Physical Solvents

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pesaran, A. (2013). Application Of Composite Polymeric Membranes For Efficient Regeneration Of Physical Solvents. (Masters Thesis). University of North Dakota. Retrieved from https://commons.und.edu/theses/1466

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pesaran, Alireza. “Application Of Composite Polymeric Membranes For Efficient Regeneration Of Physical Solvents.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of North Dakota. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://commons.und.edu/theses/1466.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pesaran, Alireza. “Application Of Composite Polymeric Membranes For Efficient Regeneration Of Physical Solvents.” 2013. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Pesaran A. Application Of Composite Polymeric Membranes For Efficient Regeneration Of Physical Solvents. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1466.

Council of Science Editors:

Pesaran A. Application Of Composite Polymeric Membranes For Efficient Regeneration Of Physical Solvents. [Masters Thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2013. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1466

3. Zhang, Xuefei. Efficient Regeneration Of Chemical Solvents For Carbon Dioxide Capture By Polymeric Membrane Contactors.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2013, University of North Dakota

Although extensive research attention has been drawn to using membranes for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from flue gas, the use of membranes for stripping CO2 solvents has rarely been studied. The technical feasibility of using polymeric membrane based separation technology to recover CO2 from CO2 saturated chemical solvents such as monoethanolamine is investigated in the present research. A membrane system was built to study the performance of several common polymeric porous membranes for the recovery of CO2 from saturated aqueous MEA solution by the thermal swing process. The stripped CO2 gas was swept by mass flow controlled N2 reference gas and was measured by a non-dispersive infrared CO2 analyzer and gas chromatography. Substantial CO2 permeation flux through the membrane together with superior selectivity suggests the promises of membrane contactors as an alternative stripping configuration for CO2 recovery. Parametric screening design of experiments studied parameters of process temperature, retentate flow rate, and sweep gas rate. Process temperature was identified as the only significant factor, which is consistent with individual parametric study results. Heat energy efficiency characterization of this system showed that roughly half of the heat energy was used for the stripping process at 80ºC and above. The membrane material candidates screening experiment results showed that polypropylene and polytetrafluoroethylene porous membranes outperformed polyester, polyamide, polyvinylidene fluoride, polysulfone and cellulose acetate. Compositional, structural and surface morphological characterization was also utilized on the membranes before and after this process. Mass transfer mechanism study and mass transfer coefficients calculation reveals that the liquid boundary layer resistance is responsible for more than 90% of the overall mass transfer resistance, much greater than either the membrane resistance or gas layer resistance. Membrane wetting and fouling effects were found to deteriorate membrane performance. Polypropylene membranes with different pore size were studied and compared. There was no significantly change of CO2 flux for membrane pore size from 0.1micron to 2.5 micron. The membrane with pore size of 0.6 micron was found to have best selectivity. The energy utilization efficiency did not change significantly for membranes with different pore size. Membranes with pore size 2.5 micron and below were found to be not wetted during the experiments and membranes with pore size of 5 micron and 10 micron were wetted during the process. Advisors/Committee Members: Brian M. Tande.

Subjects/Keywords: carbon dioxide recovery; carbon dioxide regeneration; carbon dioxide solvent stripping; low temperature stripping; polymeric membrane contactors

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhang, X. (2013). Efficient Regeneration Of Chemical Solvents For Carbon Dioxide Capture By Polymeric Membrane Contactors. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of North Dakota. Retrieved from https://commons.und.edu/theses/1495

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhang, Xuefei. “Efficient Regeneration Of Chemical Solvents For Carbon Dioxide Capture By Polymeric Membrane Contactors.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of North Dakota. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://commons.und.edu/theses/1495.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhang, Xuefei. “Efficient Regeneration Of Chemical Solvents For Carbon Dioxide Capture By Polymeric Membrane Contactors.” 2013. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Zhang X. Efficient Regeneration Of Chemical Solvents For Carbon Dioxide Capture By Polymeric Membrane Contactors. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of North Dakota; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1495.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhang X. Efficient Regeneration Of Chemical Solvents For Carbon Dioxide Capture By Polymeric Membrane Contactors. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of North Dakota; 2013. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1495

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