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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina – Greensboro" +contributor:("Cheryl Lovelady"). Showing records 1 – 8 of 8 total matches.

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University of North Carolina – Greensboro

1. Burklin, Aubrey. Determinants of infant growth within the first six months of life.

Degree: 2017, University of North Carolina – Greensboro

 Infants who gain weight rapidly during the first year of life are more likely to be overweight later in childhood. Suggested predictors of infant weight… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Infants – Nutrition; Infants – Weight; Breastfeeding – Health aspects; Bottle feeding – Health aspects

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burklin, A. (2017). Determinants of infant growth within the first six months of life. (Masters Thesis). University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Retrieved from http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=22051

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burklin, Aubrey. “Determinants of infant growth within the first six months of life.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=22051.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burklin, Aubrey. “Determinants of infant growth within the first six months of life.” 2017. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Burklin A. Determinants of infant growth within the first six months of life. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=22051.

Council of Science Editors:

Burklin A. Determinants of infant growth within the first six months of life. [Masters Thesis]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2017. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=22051


University of North Carolina – Greensboro

2. Shearer, Elyse A. The effect of a diet and exercise intervention on body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors in postpartum women.

Degree: 2015, University of North Carolina – Greensboro

 Obesity among women is a public health problem in the United States. Pregnancy may be one of the causes of this, with 56% of women… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Obesity in women; Puerperium – Nutritional aspects; Weight loss; Exercise for women; Physical fitness for women

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shearer, E. A. (2015). The effect of a diet and exercise intervention on body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors in postpartum women. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Retrieved from http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=19125

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shearer, Elyse A. “The effect of a diet and exercise intervention on body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors in postpartum women.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=19125.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shearer, Elyse A. “The effect of a diet and exercise intervention on body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors in postpartum women.” 2015. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Shearer EA. The effect of a diet and exercise intervention on body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors in postpartum women. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=19125.

Council of Science Editors:

Shearer EA. The effect of a diet and exercise intervention on body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors in postpartum women. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2015. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=19125


University of North Carolina – Greensboro

3. Mellendick, Kevan M. Diet quality and cardiovascular disease risks in adolescents.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina – Greensboro

 Obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among adolescents have become major public health concerns. Obesity rate has reached 18.4% among 12-19 year olds, and 20.3%… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Teenagers – Nutrition; Obesity in adolescence; Health behavior in adolescence

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APA (6th Edition):

Mellendick, K. M. (2016). Diet quality and cardiovascular disease risks in adolescents. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Retrieved from http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=21005

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mellendick, Kevan M. “Diet quality and cardiovascular disease risks in adolescents.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=21005.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mellendick, Kevan M. “Diet quality and cardiovascular disease risks in adolescents.” 2016. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Mellendick KM. Diet quality and cardiovascular disease risks in adolescents. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=21005.

Council of Science Editors:

Mellendick KM. Diet quality and cardiovascular disease risks in adolescents. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2016. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=21005


University of North Carolina – Greensboro

4. Sorvillo, Andrea. The effects of diet and exercise on bone mineral density during the first year postpartum.

Degree: 2013, University of North Carolina – Greensboro

 During lactation, women can lose up to 10% of bone mineral density (BMD) at trabecular-rich sites. Previous studies report resistance exercise to slow BMD losses;… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Osteoporosis in women; Breastfeeding – Health aspects; Lactation – Nutritional aspects; Mothers – Nutrition; Mothers – Health and hygiene

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sorvillo, A. (2013). The effects of diet and exercise on bone mineral density during the first year postpartum. (Masters Thesis). University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Retrieved from http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=15058

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sorvillo, Andrea. “The effects of diet and exercise on bone mineral density during the first year postpartum.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=15058.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sorvillo, Andrea. “The effects of diet and exercise on bone mineral density during the first year postpartum.” 2013. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Sorvillo A. The effects of diet and exercise on bone mineral density during the first year postpartum. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=15058.

Council of Science Editors:

Sorvillo A. The effects of diet and exercise on bone mineral density during the first year postpartum. [Masters Thesis]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2013. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=15058


University of North Carolina – Greensboro

5. Moening, Gina A. Diet quality and weight change among overweight and obese postpartum women enrolled in a behavioral intervention program.

Degree: 2011, University of North Carolina – Greensboro

 Many women enter pregnancy already overweight or obese, and then gain weight in excess of what is recommended by the Institute of Medicine. Evidence shows… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Postnatal care – Nutritional aspects; Obesity in women – Treatment – Case studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Moening, G. A. (2011). Diet quality and weight change among overweight and obese postpartum women enrolled in a behavioral intervention program. (Masters Thesis). University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Retrieved from http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=8147

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moening, Gina A. “Diet quality and weight change among overweight and obese postpartum women enrolled in a behavioral intervention program.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=8147.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moening, Gina A. “Diet quality and weight change among overweight and obese postpartum women enrolled in a behavioral intervention program.” 2011. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Moening GA. Diet quality and weight change among overweight and obese postpartum women enrolled in a behavioral intervention program. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2011. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=8147.

Council of Science Editors:

Moening GA. Diet quality and weight change among overweight and obese postpartum women enrolled in a behavioral intervention program. [Masters Thesis]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2011. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=8147


University of North Carolina – Greensboro

6. Wilson, Kelsey. Relationship of feeding human milk by breast versus bottle with infant growth.

Degree: 2015, University of North Carolina – Greensboro

 Research suggests that infants fed human milk from a bottle versus the breast may have higher weight gains in the first six to 12 months… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Infants – Nutrition; Breastfeeding; Bottle feeding

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wilson, K. (2015). Relationship of feeding human milk by breast versus bottle with infant growth. (Masters Thesis). University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Retrieved from http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=18468

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilson, Kelsey. “Relationship of feeding human milk by breast versus bottle with infant growth.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=18468.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilson, Kelsey. “Relationship of feeding human milk by breast versus bottle with infant growth.” 2015. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Wilson K. Relationship of feeding human milk by breast versus bottle with infant growth. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=18468.

Council of Science Editors:

Wilson K. Relationship of feeding human milk by breast versus bottle with infant growth. [Masters Thesis]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2015. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=18468

7. Laster, Leigh Ellen R. Diet quality of mothers and their preschoolers enrolled in an obesity prevention trial.

Degree: 2013, University of North Carolina – Greensboro

 Children of obese parents are more likely to become obese than children of normal weight parents. However, there is little information regarding diet intake of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Mother and child – North Carolina; Obesity in children – Etiology; Obesity in children – Risk factors; Obesity – Nutritional aspects; Obesity – Prevention; Children – Nutrition; Diet – North Carolina

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APA (6th Edition):

Laster, L. E. R. (2013). Diet quality of mothers and their preschoolers enrolled in an obesity prevention trial. (Masters Thesis). University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Retrieved from http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=15038

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Laster, Leigh Ellen R. “Diet quality of mothers and their preschoolers enrolled in an obesity prevention trial.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=15038.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Laster, Leigh Ellen R. “Diet quality of mothers and their preschoolers enrolled in an obesity prevention trial.” 2013. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Laster LER. Diet quality of mothers and their preschoolers enrolled in an obesity prevention trial. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=15038.

Council of Science Editors:

Laster LER. Diet quality of mothers and their preschoolers enrolled in an obesity prevention trial. [Masters Thesis]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2013. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=15038


University of North Carolina – Greensboro

8. Thomas, David Travis. The effect of a high dairy diet, dairy supplementation, and resistance exercise on increasing lean body mass and decreasing fat mass in overweight women.

Degree: 2009, University of North Carolina – Greensboro

 Previous reports suggest that high dairy calcium diets help augment total and regional fat loss in obese women. Other reports suggest that timed protein ingestion… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Isometric exercise – Health aspects.; Dairy products in human nutrition.; Women – Nutrition.; Women – Health and hygiene.; Body composition.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thomas, D. T. (2009). The effect of a high dairy diet, dairy supplementation, and resistance exercise on increasing lean body mass and decreasing fat mass in overweight women. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Retrieved from http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=2553

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thomas, David Travis. “The effect of a high dairy diet, dairy supplementation, and resistance exercise on increasing lean body mass and decreasing fat mass in overweight women.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of North Carolina – Greensboro. Accessed November 14, 2019. http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=2553.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thomas, David Travis. “The effect of a high dairy diet, dairy supplementation, and resistance exercise on increasing lean body mass and decreasing fat mass in overweight women.” 2009. Web. 14 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Thomas DT. The effect of a high dairy diet, dairy supplementation, and resistance exercise on increasing lean body mass and decreasing fat mass in overweight women. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2009. [cited 2019 Nov 14]. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=2553.

Council of Science Editors:

Thomas DT. The effect of a high dairy diet, dairy supplementation, and resistance exercise on increasing lean body mass and decreasing fat mass in overweight women. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of North Carolina – Greensboro; 2009. Available from: http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/listing.aspx?styp=ti&id=2553

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