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University of North Carolina

1. Vitriol, Eric. Using microscopy to manipulate and visualize signal transduction in living cells.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2009, University of North Carolina

Signaling events in cells are often localized and transient. Understanding how these pathways are regulated in space and time requires the development of new tools that reveal spatiotemporal transduction. Subcellular events can be visualized in real-time by high-resolution light microscopy. Technological advances in live-cell imaging have offered the means to not only observe the phenotypic consequences of signaling events, but to visualize and manipulate the activity of their components. This dissertation describes four studies in which microscopy is implemented to manipulate or visualize signal transduction in living cells. The first study demonstrates contributions to Chromophore Assisted Laser Inactivation, a light-mediated loss of function tool. The second study describes the generation of a new probe to visualize the activation of Src-family kinases. The third study utilizes a biosensor for the GTPase RhoA to reveal novel information about how this signaling component is spatiotemporally regulated in neurons. Finally, the fourth study describes a new computational method for the automated identification and tracking of protein structures called focal adhesions. Together these studies demonstrate the power of using microscopy to gain key insights to the spatiotemporal details of signal transduction. Advisors/Committee Members: Vitriol, Eric, Jacobson, Ken, Hahn, Klaus, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vitriol, E. (2009). Using microscopy to manipulate and visualize signal transduction in living cells. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:a634c10e-1ff8-4e6d-bdcd-338c99880388

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vitriol, Eric. “Using microscopy to manipulate and visualize signal transduction in living cells.” 2009. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed December 01, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:a634c10e-1ff8-4e6d-bdcd-338c99880388.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vitriol, Eric. “Using microscopy to manipulate and visualize signal transduction in living cells.” 2009. Web. 01 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Vitriol E. Using microscopy to manipulate and visualize signal transduction in living cells. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2009. [cited 2020 Dec 01]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:a634c10e-1ff8-4e6d-bdcd-338c99880388.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Vitriol E. Using microscopy to manipulate and visualize signal transduction in living cells. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2009. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:a634c10e-1ff8-4e6d-bdcd-338c99880388

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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