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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Stevens, Elise"). One record found.

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University of North Carolina

1. Stevens, Elise. Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina

Combining the literature on humor, affect, the parasocial contact hypothesis, and stigma, this dissertation examines the relationship between humor and mental illness stigma in entertainment programming. The model predicted that cognitive and affective humor would predict positive affect and approach of the character with a mental illness. Positive affect and approach were hypothesized to predict parasocial interaction. Parasocial interaction was hypothesized to predict less social distance and less stigma. Study 1 examined this relationship using the television program, Enlightened. Two conditions (one with more humor and one with less humor) were presented to participants (N = 106). Results showed that more perceived cognitive (surprise) and affective (dark) humor predicted positive affect. Those who perceived less disparagement humor were more likely to want to approach the character. Approach predicted PSI and PSI predicted less stigma towards those with mental illness and predicted less social distance. As participants perceived more affective humor, they also felt more stigma towards those with mental illnesses. Study 2 (N = 82) replicated much of these results with different stimuli from the program, Girls. Specifically, affective and cognitive humor predicted positive affect (note: cognitive humor approached significance). Disparagement humor predicted approach tendency. Approach tendency predicted PSI and PSI predicted less social distance between the viewer and a person with a specific mental illness. There was a direct relationship between perceiving more affective humor and reporting more stigma towards those with mental illnesses. Implications for entertainment, theory, and health communication are discussed in addition to limitations and directions for future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Stevens, Elise, Dillman Carpentier, Francesca, Gibson, Rhonda, Comello, Nori, Hoffner, Cynthia, Raney, Art.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Media and Journalism; Mass Communication Graduate Program

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stevens, E. (2016). Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e2d16f11-de61-44cc-bc7a-d15cfbd144f5

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stevens, Elise. “Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed February 28, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e2d16f11-de61-44cc-bc7a-d15cfbd144f5.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stevens, Elise. “Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen.” 2016. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Stevens E. Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e2d16f11-de61-44cc-bc7a-d15cfbd144f5.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Stevens E. Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e2d16f11-de61-44cc-bc7a-d15cfbd144f5

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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