Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Schisler, Jonathan"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of North Carolina

1. Rubel, Carrie. Defining the Molecular Mechanisms of Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction as a Driver of Disease: CHIP mutation in SCAR16.

Degree: Pharmacology, 2015, University of North Carolina

All cells must respond to changes in their environment including a plethora of physiologic and pathologic stresses in order to maintain homeostasis and survive. Protein homeostasis is particularly critical to cell survival and cells utilize multiple highly specialized and integrated methods of protein quality control (PQC) to ensure that proteins are appropriately folded and terminally misfolded proteins are eliminated to prevent proteotoxicity. PQC depends on an elegant collaboration between molecular chaperones and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Disruption of PQC and subsequent proteotoxicity is an underlying molecular phenotype in disease pathologies in the brain and heart. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying diseases where disruption of PQC is central to disease pathology is key to our ability to intervene therapeutically. To this end, this thesis focuses on understanding the function of E3 ubiquitin ligases and how mutations in these key players in the UPS can drive disease pathology in the heart and brain. First, I describe and validate a novel method for the identification of E3 ubiquitin ligase substrates addressing a significant technological limitation in the field. Next, I describe the first discovery of human mutation in the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP in a form of spinocerebellar ataxia, Gordon Holmes Syndrome that has led to the establishment of a new disease designation, autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-16 (SCAR16) to describe spinocerebellar ataxia caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation in CHIP. Finally, I expanded upon this discovery to define the structural and functional consequences of CHIP mutation in SCAR16 and explore the deficits associated with this mutation in a genomic context utilizing a mouse model system providing the first in vivo, disease-relevant model of partial CHIP dysfunction. Together these studies provide novel tools to further our understanding of the UPS and reveal fascinating insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying CHIP mutation in SCAR16 disease that not only may facilitate the development of therapies for this devastating disease, but also contribute to our basic understanding of the UPS and its role in disease pathogenesis to drive successful investment, innovation, preclinical investigation and clinical study design in other disease areas. Advisors/Committee Members: Rubel, Carrie, Johnson, Gary, Schisler, Jonathan, Emanuele, Michael, Johnson, Gary, Nicholas, Robert.

Subjects/Keywords: Pharmacology; Cytology; Biochemistry; School of Medicine; Department of Pharmacology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rubel, C. (2015). Defining the Molecular Mechanisms of Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction as a Driver of Disease: CHIP mutation in SCAR16. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:ef6ac26c-167b-4433-aa30-f24b3bace803

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rubel, Carrie. “Defining the Molecular Mechanisms of Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction as a Driver of Disease: CHIP mutation in SCAR16.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 27, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:ef6ac26c-167b-4433-aa30-f24b3bace803.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rubel, Carrie. “Defining the Molecular Mechanisms of Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction as a Driver of Disease: CHIP mutation in SCAR16.” 2015. Web. 27 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Rubel C. Defining the Molecular Mechanisms of Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction as a Driver of Disease: CHIP mutation in SCAR16. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 27]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:ef6ac26c-167b-4433-aa30-f24b3bace803.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rubel C. Defining the Molecular Mechanisms of Ubiquitin Proteasome System Dysfunction as a Driver of Disease: CHIP mutation in SCAR16. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:ef6ac26c-167b-4433-aa30-f24b3bace803

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. SKINNER, HARLYN. PERSONAL UTILITY: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF GENOMIC RISK KNOWLEDGE ON MOTIVATION TOWARD DIET AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BEHAVIOR CHANGES.

Degree: Nutrition, 2017, University of North Carolina

The National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have jointly indicated urgency in researching the use of personal genomics in the assessment of disease prevention. One research priority is the use of genomic information in behavior change research for reducing the risk for common chronic disease (e.g., cardiovascular disease—CVD). Research suggests improvements in motivation toward behavior change with counseling based on one gene (genetic counseling) and even better outcomes with counseling based on two or more genes (genomic or polygenetic counseling). Currently, little is known about the effect of genetic or genomic counseling in minority populations. This study examines whether genomic-risk knowledge increases motivation towards diet and physical activity changes to reduce CVD-risk in African-American participants from a rural, low-income county in eastern North Carolina. To meet this goal, we conducted three inter-related research projects. First, focus groups were conducted with African-Americans and Whites to assess community needs and wants regarding a genomics project (n=35). Findings indicated community interest in participation and interest in receiving personalized genomic results. Second, intervention messages on the return of personalized CVD genomic-risk were developed following the principles of The Protection Motivation Theory and Leventhal’s Common Sense Model. Messages were tested within the target population for comprehension and acceptance (n=32). Using a 2-arm randomized controlled trial design, returning CVD genomic results were compared to an attention control group in sixty-two (n=62) African-Americans. The primary outcome was the difference in motivation towards diet and physical activity at 1-month follow-up compared using a general linear regression model. There were no significant between- or within-group results (p=0.51). There was significant within-group moderation by genomic-risk category for the intervention group. Those with low genomic CVD-risk self-reported increased motivation towards diet and physical activity (0.31 ± 0.18, p=0.09), and increased weekly consumption of fruit and vegetables (1.34 ± 0.36, p=0.001). Those with average genomic CVD-risk self-reported less motivation and no change in fruit and vegetable consumption. Findings suggest that genomic-risk knowledge may impact the perceived threat of CVD, but more research needs to be done to better understand the best use for this approach. Advisors/Committee Members: SKINNER, HARLYN, Ammerman, Alice, Keyserling, Thomas, Schisler, Jonathan, Ward, Dianne, Samuel-Hodge, Carmen.

Subjects/Keywords: Gillings School of Global Public Health; Department of Nutrition

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

SKINNER, H. (2017). PERSONAL UTILITY: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF GENOMIC RISK KNOWLEDGE ON MOTIVATION TOWARD DIET AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BEHAVIOR CHANGES. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f5dbc42a-6297-4954-9789-10ba14244762

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

SKINNER, HARLYN. “PERSONAL UTILITY: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF GENOMIC RISK KNOWLEDGE ON MOTIVATION TOWARD DIET AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BEHAVIOR CHANGES.” 2017. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 27, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f5dbc42a-6297-4954-9789-10ba14244762.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

SKINNER, HARLYN. “PERSONAL UTILITY: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF GENOMIC RISK KNOWLEDGE ON MOTIVATION TOWARD DIET AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BEHAVIOR CHANGES.” 2017. Web. 27 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

SKINNER H. PERSONAL UTILITY: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF GENOMIC RISK KNOWLEDGE ON MOTIVATION TOWARD DIET AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BEHAVIOR CHANGES. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 27]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f5dbc42a-6297-4954-9789-10ba14244762.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

SKINNER H. PERSONAL UTILITY: EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF GENOMIC RISK KNOWLEDGE ON MOTIVATION TOWARD DIET AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY BEHAVIOR CHANGES. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f5dbc42a-6297-4954-9789-10ba14244762

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.