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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Rogers, Stephen"). Showing records 1 – 17 of 17 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Manning, Alyssa Julia. Regulation of Epithelial Morphogenesis by the Drosophila Folded gastrulation Signaling Pathway.

Degree: Biology, 2013, University of North Carolina

 Understanding morphogenesis, the set of processes by which cells are rearranged and change shape to form organs and other higher-order structures, is crucial to our… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Manning, A. J. (2013). Regulation of Epithelial Morphogenesis by the Drosophila Folded gastrulation Signaling Pathway. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6e9b4f08-de2b-430f-865a-613769d1ffb8

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Manning, Alyssa Julia. “Regulation of Epithelial Morphogenesis by the Drosophila Folded gastrulation Signaling Pathway.” 2013. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6e9b4f08-de2b-430f-865a-613769d1ffb8.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Manning, Alyssa Julia. “Regulation of Epithelial Morphogenesis by the Drosophila Folded gastrulation Signaling Pathway.” 2013. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Manning AJ. Regulation of Epithelial Morphogenesis by the Drosophila Folded gastrulation Signaling Pathway. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6e9b4f08-de2b-430f-865a-613769d1ffb8.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Manning AJ. Regulation of Epithelial Morphogenesis by the Drosophila Folded gastrulation Signaling Pathway. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6e9b4f08-de2b-430f-865a-613769d1ffb8

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Peters, Kimberly Ann. The role of canonical and non-canonical regulators of heterotrimeric G protein signaling during Drosophila melanogaster morphogenesis.

Degree: Biology, 2012, University of North Carolina

 Morphogenesis of multicellular organisms requires precise regulation of cell movements and cell shape changes. The first morphogenetic movement to occur in Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Peters, K. A. (2012). The role of canonical and non-canonical regulators of heterotrimeric G protein signaling during Drosophila melanogaster morphogenesis. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f3d111ff-2a45-4cea-aa7f-e84eb7157b3f

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Peters, Kimberly Ann. “The role of canonical and non-canonical regulators of heterotrimeric G protein signaling during Drosophila melanogaster morphogenesis.” 2012. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f3d111ff-2a45-4cea-aa7f-e84eb7157b3f.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Peters, Kimberly Ann. “The role of canonical and non-canonical regulators of heterotrimeric G protein signaling during Drosophila melanogaster morphogenesis.” 2012. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Peters KA. The role of canonical and non-canonical regulators of heterotrimeric G protein signaling during Drosophila melanogaster morphogenesis. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2012. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f3d111ff-2a45-4cea-aa7f-e84eb7157b3f.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Peters KA. The role of canonical and non-canonical regulators of heterotrimeric G protein signaling during Drosophila melanogaster morphogenesis. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2012. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f3d111ff-2a45-4cea-aa7f-e84eb7157b3f

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

3. Moawad, Amanda. Drosophila Midline Development: The Role of 18-Wheeler and an Optimized Protocol for Transcriptome Analysis.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina

 The developing midline of Drosophila consists of diverse cell types that must migrate and differentiate appropriately to form a functional central nervous system. Despite the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; UNC Neuroscience Center; Neuroscience Curriculum

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APA (6th Edition):

Moawad, A. (2016). Drosophila Midline Development: The Role of 18-Wheeler and an Optimized Protocol for Transcriptome Analysis. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e8907733-000e-485b-901d-0d18fda3f1ea

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moawad, Amanda. “Drosophila Midline Development: The Role of 18-Wheeler and an Optimized Protocol for Transcriptome Analysis.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e8907733-000e-485b-901d-0d18fda3f1ea.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moawad, Amanda. “Drosophila Midline Development: The Role of 18-Wheeler and an Optimized Protocol for Transcriptome Analysis.” 2016. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Moawad A. Drosophila Midline Development: The Role of 18-Wheeler and an Optimized Protocol for Transcriptome Analysis. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e8907733-000e-485b-901d-0d18fda3f1ea.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Moawad A. Drosophila Midline Development: The Role of 18-Wheeler and an Optimized Protocol for Transcriptome Analysis. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e8907733-000e-485b-901d-0d18fda3f1ea

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

4. Kotlyanskaya, Lyudmila. STUDY OF DISABLED ADAPTOR PROTEIN IN THE ABELSON KINASE SIGNALING PATHWAY IN DROSOPHILA.

Degree: 2014, University of North Carolina

 In the development of tissues such as the nervous system, the actin cytoskeleton is remodeled in cells by protein signaling cascades that allow cells to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cytology; Developmental biology; Neurosciences; School of Medicine; UNC Neuroscience Center; Neuroscience Curriculum

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APA (6th Edition):

Kotlyanskaya, L. (2014). STUDY OF DISABLED ADAPTOR PROTEIN IN THE ABELSON KINASE SIGNALING PATHWAY IN DROSOPHILA. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:13143504-6eea-469c-afd7-1e3c07568b98

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kotlyanskaya, Lyudmila. “STUDY OF DISABLED ADAPTOR PROTEIN IN THE ABELSON KINASE SIGNALING PATHWAY IN DROSOPHILA.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:13143504-6eea-469c-afd7-1e3c07568b98.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kotlyanskaya, Lyudmila. “STUDY OF DISABLED ADAPTOR PROTEIN IN THE ABELSON KINASE SIGNALING PATHWAY IN DROSOPHILA.” 2014. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Kotlyanskaya L. STUDY OF DISABLED ADAPTOR PROTEIN IN THE ABELSON KINASE SIGNALING PATHWAY IN DROSOPHILA. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:13143504-6eea-469c-afd7-1e3c07568b98.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kotlyanskaya L. STUDY OF DISABLED ADAPTOR PROTEIN IN THE ABELSON KINASE SIGNALING PATHWAY IN DROSOPHILA. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:13143504-6eea-469c-afd7-1e3c07568b98

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

5. Trogden, Kathryn. TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics.

Degree: Biology, 2015, University of North Carolina

 Within a cell, the ends of individual microtubules switch between three different phases: growth, shrinkage and pause without affecting the total mass of microtubule polymer.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cytology; College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Trogden, K. (2015). TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e7f154cb-e2de-418b-a81d-6446323d1fcb

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Trogden, Kathryn. “TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e7f154cb-e2de-418b-a81d-6446323d1fcb.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Trogden, Kathryn. “TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics.” 2015. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Trogden K. TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e7f154cb-e2de-418b-a81d-6446323d1fcb.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Trogden K. TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e7f154cb-e2de-418b-a81d-6446323d1fcb

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

6. Grode, Kyle. Identification of the Molecular Determinants for Regulation of Microtubule Severing by Katanin.

Degree: Biology, 2015, University of North Carolina

 Microtubules are dynamic cytoskeletal polymers that form complex and highly organized arrays essential for cell motility, morphogenesis, and division. Microtubule severing is a reaction that… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Cytology; Molecular biology; College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Grode, K. (2015). Identification of the Molecular Determinants for Regulation of Microtubule Severing by Katanin. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2dc5a3bc-6441-4fbc-86f2-6b1317b9a796

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Grode, Kyle. “Identification of the Molecular Determinants for Regulation of Microtubule Severing by Katanin.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2dc5a3bc-6441-4fbc-86f2-6b1317b9a796.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Grode, Kyle. “Identification of the Molecular Determinants for Regulation of Microtubule Severing by Katanin.” 2015. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Grode K. Identification of the Molecular Determinants for Regulation of Microtubule Severing by Katanin. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2dc5a3bc-6441-4fbc-86f2-6b1317b9a796.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Grode K. Identification of the Molecular Determinants for Regulation of Microtubule Severing by Katanin. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2dc5a3bc-6441-4fbc-86f2-6b1317b9a796

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

7. Haynes, Elizabeth. GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2015, University of North Carolina

 The lamellipodium is an important structure for cell migration containing branched actin nucleated via the Arp2/3 complex. The formation of branched actin is relatively well… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cytology; School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

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APA (6th Edition):

Haynes, E. (2015). GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e5600e13-7990-465c-b3d2-981e18a7c4e0

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haynes, Elizabeth. “GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e5600e13-7990-465c-b3d2-981e18a7c4e0.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haynes, Elizabeth. “GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts.” 2015. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Haynes E. GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e5600e13-7990-465c-b3d2-981e18a7c4e0.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Haynes E. GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e5600e13-7990-465c-b3d2-981e18a7c4e0

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

8. Alan, Jamie. TYROSINE KINASE MODULATION OF TRAFFICKING AND BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS OF THE ATYPICAL RHO GTPASE, WRCH-1.

Degree: Pharmacology, 2010, University of North Carolina

 Wrch-1 is an atypical Rho family small GTPase with roles in oncogenic transformation, epithelial cell morphogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and migration. We have shown previously that Wrch-1… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Pharmacology

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APA (6th Edition):

Alan, J. (2010). TYROSINE KINASE MODULATION OF TRAFFICKING AND BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS OF THE ATYPICAL RHO GTPASE, WRCH-1. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:afbc9ce5-f21d-4707-8744-357971e1eb3b

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Alan, Jamie. “TYROSINE KINASE MODULATION OF TRAFFICKING AND BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS OF THE ATYPICAL RHO GTPASE, WRCH-1.” 2010. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:afbc9ce5-f21d-4707-8744-357971e1eb3b.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Alan, Jamie. “TYROSINE KINASE MODULATION OF TRAFFICKING AND BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS OF THE ATYPICAL RHO GTPASE, WRCH-1.” 2010. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Alan J. TYROSINE KINASE MODULATION OF TRAFFICKING AND BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS OF THE ATYPICAL RHO GTPASE, WRCH-1. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2010. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:afbc9ce5-f21d-4707-8744-357971e1eb3b.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Alan J. TYROSINE KINASE MODULATION OF TRAFFICKING AND BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS OF THE ATYPICAL RHO GTPASE, WRCH-1. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2010. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:afbc9ce5-f21d-4707-8744-357971e1eb3b

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

9. Yu, Zhixian. Excess Centrosomes in Endothelial Cells: Causes And Effects.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina

 Tumor endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of tumor blood vessels, were considered genetically normal until recent findings showed that they can be aneuploid,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Yu, Z. (2016). Excess Centrosomes in Endothelial Cells: Causes And Effects. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2a9d88a7-8d43-41b2-bb9f-27235d174d72

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yu, Zhixian. “Excess Centrosomes in Endothelial Cells: Causes And Effects.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2a9d88a7-8d43-41b2-bb9f-27235d174d72.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yu, Zhixian. “Excess Centrosomes in Endothelial Cells: Causes And Effects.” 2016. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Yu Z. Excess Centrosomes in Endothelial Cells: Causes And Effects. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2a9d88a7-8d43-41b2-bb9f-27235d174d72.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Yu Z. Excess Centrosomes in Endothelial Cells: Causes And Effects. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2a9d88a7-8d43-41b2-bb9f-27235d174d72

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

10. Kutys, Matthew. A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2014, University of North Carolina

 Differential activation of the Rho family GTPases, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA, helps to govern the distinct morphological and migratory phenotypes downstream of adhesion to different… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cytology; Biochemistry; School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

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APA (6th Edition):

Kutys, M. (2014). A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:bf6d58e1-869c-49e5-baff-5df0a348eaec

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kutys, Matthew. “A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:bf6d58e1-869c-49e5-baff-5df0a348eaec.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kutys, Matthew. “A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration.” 2014. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Kutys M. A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:bf6d58e1-869c-49e5-baff-5df0a348eaec.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kutys M. A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:bf6d58e1-869c-49e5-baff-5df0a348eaec

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

11. Currie, Joshua David. TOG Proteins: Essential +TIPs Regulators of Interphase Microtubule Dynamics.

Degree: Biology, 2011, University of North Carolina

 Microtubules exhibit a signature behavior, termed dynamic instability, in which individual microtubules cycle between phases of growth and shrinkage while the total microtubule polymer remains… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Currie, J. D. (2011). TOG Proteins: Essential +TIPs Regulators of Interphase Microtubule Dynamics. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:cc9c3cd6-e077-493d-bed3-6708ec8a282f

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Currie, Joshua David. “TOG Proteins: Essential +TIPs Regulators of Interphase Microtubule Dynamics.” 2011. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:cc9c3cd6-e077-493d-bed3-6708ec8a282f.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Currie, Joshua David. “TOG Proteins: Essential +TIPs Regulators of Interphase Microtubule Dynamics.” 2011. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Currie JD. TOG Proteins: Essential +TIPs Regulators of Interphase Microtubule Dynamics. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:cc9c3cd6-e077-493d-bed3-6708ec8a282f.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Currie JD. TOG Proteins: Essential +TIPs Regulators of Interphase Microtubule Dynamics. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2011. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:cc9c3cd6-e077-493d-bed3-6708ec8a282f

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

12. Higgins, Christopher. Investigating Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Morphogenetic Cell Shape Change.

Degree: Biology, 2016, University of North Carolina

 Changes in cell shape are a fundamental feature of animal development driving the formation of ordered tissues from disordered groups of cells. One common type… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Higgins, C. (2016). Investigating Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Morphogenetic Cell Shape Change. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:1280a2ab-b9e9-46af-9b58-c268092409a9

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Higgins, Christopher. “Investigating Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Morphogenetic Cell Shape Change.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:1280a2ab-b9e9-46af-9b58-c268092409a9.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Higgins, Christopher. “Investigating Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Morphogenetic Cell Shape Change.” 2016. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Higgins C. Investigating Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Morphogenetic Cell Shape Change. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:1280a2ab-b9e9-46af-9b58-c268092409a9.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Higgins C. Investigating Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Morphogenetic Cell Shape Change. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:1280a2ab-b9e9-46af-9b58-c268092409a9

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

13. Pronobis, Mira. LOOKING INSIDE THE WNT/BETA-CATENIN DESTRUCTION COMPLEX: MECHANISMS AND THE MINIMAL MACHINE.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina

 The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is one of the most studied signaling pathways. It is essential throughout development, and its dysregulation is linked to various diseases including… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pronobis, M. (2016). LOOKING INSIDE THE WNT/BETA-CATENIN DESTRUCTION COMPLEX: MECHANISMS AND THE MINIMAL MACHINE. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:842c06ad-efd2-4cbc-8814-703ced0b2693

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pronobis, Mira. “LOOKING INSIDE THE WNT/BETA-CATENIN DESTRUCTION COMPLEX: MECHANISMS AND THE MINIMAL MACHINE.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:842c06ad-efd2-4cbc-8814-703ced0b2693.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pronobis, Mira. “LOOKING INSIDE THE WNT/BETA-CATENIN DESTRUCTION COMPLEX: MECHANISMS AND THE MINIMAL MACHINE.” 2016. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Pronobis M. LOOKING INSIDE THE WNT/BETA-CATENIN DESTRUCTION COMPLEX: MECHANISMS AND THE MINIMAL MACHINE. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:842c06ad-efd2-4cbc-8814-703ced0b2693.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pronobis M. LOOKING INSIDE THE WNT/BETA-CATENIN DESTRUCTION COMPLEX: MECHANISMS AND THE MINIMAL MACHINE. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:842c06ad-efd2-4cbc-8814-703ced0b2693

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

14. Masedunskas, Andrius. The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Endocytosis and Exocytosis in the Salivary Glands of Live Rodents.

Degree: Biology, 2014, University of North Carolina

 In the last two decades, mammalian cell biology has greatly benefited from major technological advances in light microscopy that have enabled imaging virtually any cellular… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Cytology; College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Masedunskas, A. (2014). The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Endocytosis and Exocytosis in the Salivary Glands of Live Rodents. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:a7247375-380c-47d4-8c84-ebe7b789b7d7

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Masedunskas, Andrius. “The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Endocytosis and Exocytosis in the Salivary Glands of Live Rodents.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:a7247375-380c-47d4-8c84-ebe7b789b7d7.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Masedunskas, Andrius. “The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Endocytosis and Exocytosis in the Salivary Glands of Live Rodents.” 2014. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Masedunskas A. The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Endocytosis and Exocytosis in the Salivary Glands of Live Rodents. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:a7247375-380c-47d4-8c84-ebe7b789b7d7.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Masedunskas A. The Role of Actin Cytoskeleton in Endocytosis and Exocytosis in the Salivary Glands of Live Rodents. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:a7247375-380c-47d4-8c84-ebe7b789b7d7

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

15. Wright, Catherine. LGN-Dependent Microtubule Regulation Influences Endothelial Cell Migration, Adhesion, and Sprout Integrity.

Degree: 2014, University of North Carolina

 Blood vessels form during organismal development and maintain integrity to provide oxygen and nutrients to the tissues. Vessels are comprised of endothelial cells that coordinate… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cytology; School of Medicine; Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wright, C. (2014). LGN-Dependent Microtubule Regulation Influences Endothelial Cell Migration, Adhesion, and Sprout Integrity. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d2f0314f-02a1-4b71-bc04-7234179ca432

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wright, Catherine. “LGN-Dependent Microtubule Regulation Influences Endothelial Cell Migration, Adhesion, and Sprout Integrity.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d2f0314f-02a1-4b71-bc04-7234179ca432.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wright, Catherine. “LGN-Dependent Microtubule Regulation Influences Endothelial Cell Migration, Adhesion, and Sprout Integrity.” 2014. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Wright C. LGN-Dependent Microtubule Regulation Influences Endothelial Cell Migration, Adhesion, and Sprout Integrity. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d2f0314f-02a1-4b71-bc04-7234179ca432.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wright C. LGN-Dependent Microtubule Regulation Influences Endothelial Cell Migration, Adhesion, and Sprout Integrity. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d2f0314f-02a1-4b71-bc04-7234179ca432

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

16. Harunaga, Jill. Cell and Matrix Interactions during Branching Morphogenesis.

Degree: Biology, 2014, University of North Carolina

 During embryonic development when tissues are particularly plastic, cells within a tissue can often interact with their surrounding extracellular matrix in a reciprocal manner: the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Developmental biology; College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harunaga, J. (2014). Cell and Matrix Interactions during Branching Morphogenesis. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:fa0a91e8-637b-4e02-a879-05bc46e5e055

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harunaga, Jill. “Cell and Matrix Interactions during Branching Morphogenesis.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:fa0a91e8-637b-4e02-a879-05bc46e5e055.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harunaga, Jill. “Cell and Matrix Interactions during Branching Morphogenesis.” 2014. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Harunaga J. Cell and Matrix Interactions during Branching Morphogenesis. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:fa0a91e8-637b-4e02-a879-05bc46e5e055.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harunaga J. Cell and Matrix Interactions during Branching Morphogenesis. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:fa0a91e8-637b-4e02-a879-05bc46e5e055

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

17. Nowotarski, Stephanie. Roles and interactions of Enabled, Diaphanous and Capping Protein in regulation of actin structures in Drosophila development.

Degree: Biology, 2014, University of North Carolina

 Proper regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is integral for development. As a dynamic polymer, actin is highly regulated by a host of binding proteins, which… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Developmental biology; Cytology; College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nowotarski, S. (2014). Roles and interactions of Enabled, Diaphanous and Capping Protein in regulation of actin structures in Drosophila development. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6c95c205-15b1-41fa-828e-2c3d9681eba8

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nowotarski, Stephanie. “Roles and interactions of Enabled, Diaphanous and Capping Protein in regulation of actin structures in Drosophila development.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 24, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6c95c205-15b1-41fa-828e-2c3d9681eba8.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nowotarski, Stephanie. “Roles and interactions of Enabled, Diaphanous and Capping Protein in regulation of actin structures in Drosophila development.” 2014. Web. 24 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Nowotarski S. Roles and interactions of Enabled, Diaphanous and Capping Protein in regulation of actin structures in Drosophila development. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 24]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6c95c205-15b1-41fa-828e-2c3d9681eba8.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Nowotarski S. Roles and interactions of Enabled, Diaphanous and Capping Protein in regulation of actin structures in Drosophila development. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6c95c205-15b1-41fa-828e-2c3d9681eba8

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.