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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Perkins, Diana"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Andersen, Elizabeth. Convergence of Aberrant Electrophysiological Correlates of Salience, Affective Processing and Stress Reactivity in Patients with Schizophrenia.

Degree: 2017, University of North Carolina

Patients with schizophrenia exhibit debilitating deficits in attention and affective processing, which are often resistant to treatment and associated with poor functional outcomes. Attentional and affective processing relies on a distributed neural network of fronto-limbic circuits, which enable cognitive control and affective processing, and assist in their interaction to regulate emotional responses. Despite evidence of intact affective valence processing, schizophrenia patients are often unable to employ cognitive change strategies to reduce attentional capture by emotionally salient stimuli, or modulate neurophysiological responses to aversive stimuli. Aberrant neurophysiological correlates of orienting to task-relevant emotional stimuli are also present in unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients, suggesting they may represent vulnerability markers. However, less is known about the attentional processing of emotionally salient, task-irrelevant information in these groups, which is examined in Experiment 1 (Chapter 2). Results suggest that despite intact novelty detection, schizophrenia patients and relatives shared deficiencies in attentional processing of emotionally salient information. First-degree relatives exhibited a unique enhancement of the electrophysiological correlate underlying salience evaluation, possibly indicating a compensatory engagement of neural circuitry. While fronto-limbic circuits are fundamental for affective processing and its modulation by higher order cognitive control, this network also plays a critical role in stress regulation, and is disproportionally affected by the deleterious effects of stress. To understand the efficiency and resilience of fronto-limbic circuitry in adapting and recovering from stress exposure in schizophrenia, Experiment 2 (Chapter 3) investigated the effect of an acute experimental psychosocial stressor on neurophysiological indices of fronto-limbic-mediated emotional regulation processes. Results suggest that stress exposure modified electrophysiological correlates of affective processing in patients and controls. Furthermore, patients demonstrated aberrant fronto-limbic oscillatory indices of affective processing, as indicated by exaggerated neural excitability and inefficient frontal cognitive control, and maladaptive stress function. This imbalance between heightened neural responsivity and inefficient frontal regulation may reflect an atypical arousal state that may in turn interfere with fronto-limbic processing and promote symptomatology. Elucidating the neurophysiological correlates underlying salience detection, affective processing, and their modification by stress, will be crucial for identifying vulnerability markers, and for developing innovative treatment strategies targeting the fronto-limbic circuitry to relieve psychopathology. Advisors/Committee Members: Andersen, Elizabeth, Belger, Aysenil, Giovanello, Kelly, Perkins, Diana, Robinson, Donita, Dichter, Gabriel, Grewen, Karen, Santelli, Rebecca.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; UNC Neuroscience Center; Neuroscience Curriculum

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Andersen, E. (2017). Convergence of Aberrant Electrophysiological Correlates of Salience, Affective Processing and Stress Reactivity in Patients with Schizophrenia. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7453cc33-6461-46eb-a759-4c0926deb264

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Andersen, Elizabeth. “Convergence of Aberrant Electrophysiological Correlates of Salience, Affective Processing and Stress Reactivity in Patients with Schizophrenia.” 2017. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed November 29, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7453cc33-6461-46eb-a759-4c0926deb264.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Andersen, Elizabeth. “Convergence of Aberrant Electrophysiological Correlates of Salience, Affective Processing and Stress Reactivity in Patients with Schizophrenia.” 2017. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Andersen E. Convergence of Aberrant Electrophysiological Correlates of Salience, Affective Processing and Stress Reactivity in Patients with Schizophrenia. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7453cc33-6461-46eb-a759-4c0926deb264.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Andersen E. Convergence of Aberrant Electrophysiological Correlates of Salience, Affective Processing and Stress Reactivity in Patients with Schizophrenia. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7453cc33-6461-46eb-a759-4c0926deb264

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Gagen, Emily. Identifying Latent Groups of Individuals with First Episode Psychosis Based on Social Relationships: A Reconsideration of Social Functioning.

Degree: Psychology and Neuroscience, 2018, University of North Carolina

First episode psychosis (FEP) occurs at an important developmental time for adolescents and young adults when social relationships are of particular importance. The concept of social functioning in psychosis has frequently utilized concepts from the chronic serious mental illness (SMI) literature and as such, can lack emphasis on these relationships as being critical components of an individual’s illness and recovery. Ascertaining potential patterns of social functioning in FEP individuals can help guide treatment and identify important ways in which individuals differ in this area. The current study used latent class analysis (LCA) to identify subgroups of FEP individuals presenting for treatment at three coordinated specialty care clinics (n=134). Groups were identified based on satisfaction with social relationships and frequency of in-person and electronic communication with peers, family, and significant others. Groups were further characterized using demographic and clinical features. Linear and multinomial logistic regression models were utilized to determine the potential predictive relationships between duration of untreated psychosis (DUP), class membership, and for a subset of the sample, 6-month outcomes. Treatment goals set at baseline were also examined for their potential relationship to 6-month outcomes. LCA resulted in three classes: Class 1 (Dissatisfied) demonstrated the least satisfaction with their social relationships, reported the least frequent contact with others and greatest degree of symptom severity, particularly with regard to depression and avolition. Class 2 (Satisfied) reported the greatest degree of satisfaction and reported frequent contact with peers and family, as well as the lowest degree of symptom severity. Class 3 (In-Between) reported mixed satisfaction and dissatisfaction as well as some contact with peers and family and moderate levels of symptoms. DUP was not found to be a significant predictor of class membership or of 6-month outcomes. Neither class membership nor treatment goals were predictive of 6-month outcomes. Results are consistent with previous efforts in this area, and they extend the findings of other studies that have based classification on premorbid adjustment. Nuanced approaches to defining social functioning in FEP are indicated, as are varied approaches to treatment based on objective and subjective indicators of social interactions and social relationships. Advisors/Committee Members: Gagen, Emily, Penn, David, Algoe, Sara, Baucom, Donald, Jones, Deborah, Perkins, Diana, Wise, Erica.

Subjects/Keywords: College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gagen, E. (2018). Identifying Latent Groups of Individuals with First Episode Psychosis Based on Social Relationships: A Reconsideration of Social Functioning. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:1c0d3b86-da3f-4835-be82-e79f3cab3333

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gagen, Emily. “Identifying Latent Groups of Individuals with First Episode Psychosis Based on Social Relationships: A Reconsideration of Social Functioning.” 2018. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed November 29, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:1c0d3b86-da3f-4835-be82-e79f3cab3333.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gagen, Emily. “Identifying Latent Groups of Individuals with First Episode Psychosis Based on Social Relationships: A Reconsideration of Social Functioning.” 2018. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Gagen E. Identifying Latent Groups of Individuals with First Episode Psychosis Based on Social Relationships: A Reconsideration of Social Functioning. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2018. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:1c0d3b86-da3f-4835-be82-e79f3cab3333.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gagen E. Identifying Latent Groups of Individuals with First Episode Psychosis Based on Social Relationships: A Reconsideration of Social Functioning. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2018. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:1c0d3b86-da3f-4835-be82-e79f3cab3333

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

3. Shaffer, Joseph. Functional MRI Correlates of Schizophrenia Negative Symptoms during Auditory Oddball Task and Resting State.

Degree: 2015, University of North Carolina

Background: The negative symptoms, including flattened affect, poverty of speech, avolition, and anhedonia, are important aspects of schizophrenia for which there are no effective treatments. Understanding the neural basis of these symptoms is an important step in developing therapies for treating these symptoms. Few studies have addressed this question, and most have treated negative symptoms as a singular category. We therefore utilize two large functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) datasets to test the relationship between individual negative symptoms and functional activation and resting-state functional connectivity. Methods: The relationship between the severity of negative symptoms in schizophrenia patients and functional activation during an auditory oddball task (n = 89) and resting-state functional connectivity (n = 172) was assessed using correlation analysis and by contrasting patients with high severity symptoms with those with low severity symptoms in two datasets. Results: Activity and connectivity within limbic, striatal, default mode, and sensory processing networks were associated with negative symptoms and were differentially associated with individual negative symptom domains from the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms. Discussion: Our findings suggest that researchers should treat negative symptoms separately Furthermore, our results indicate a relationship between negative symptoms and a failure to suppress default-mode and sensory networks. Advisors/Committee Members: Shaffer, Joseph, Belger, Aysenil, Robinson, Donita, Manis, Paul B., Grewen, Karen, Perkins, Diana, Elston, Timothy, Dichter, Gabriel.

Subjects/Keywords: Neurosciences; Psychobiology; Psychology; School of Medicine; UNC Neuroscience Center; Neuroscience Curriculum

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shaffer, J. (2015). Functional MRI Correlates of Schizophrenia Negative Symptoms during Auditory Oddball Task and Resting State. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:64e096d6-af5c-4a7d-9b59-b39e26b7c977

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shaffer, Joseph. “Functional MRI Correlates of Schizophrenia Negative Symptoms during Auditory Oddball Task and Resting State.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed November 29, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:64e096d6-af5c-4a7d-9b59-b39e26b7c977.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shaffer, Joseph. “Functional MRI Correlates of Schizophrenia Negative Symptoms during Auditory Oddball Task and Resting State.” 2015. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Shaffer J. Functional MRI Correlates of Schizophrenia Negative Symptoms during Auditory Oddball Task and Resting State. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:64e096d6-af5c-4a7d-9b59-b39e26b7c977.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Shaffer J. Functional MRI Correlates of Schizophrenia Negative Symptoms during Auditory Oddball Task and Resting State. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:64e096d6-af5c-4a7d-9b59-b39e26b7c977

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.