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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Nesmith, Jessica"). One record found.

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University of North Carolina

1. Nesmith, Jessica. Investigation of Flt1 and VEGF signaling in connections during sprouting angiogenesis.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina

Blood vessel formation is essential for vertebrate development and is primarily achieved by angiogenesis, the sprouting of endothelial cells from pre-existing vessels. Vessel networks expand when sprouts form new connections, a process whose regulation is poorly understood. Here we show that vessel anastomosis is spatially regulated by VEGFR1 (Flt1), a VEGF-A receptor that acts as a ligand decoy receptor. Expanding vessel networks in vivo favor interactions with flt-1 mutant endothelial cells. Live imaging in vitro revealed that stable connections are preceded by transient contacts from extending sprouts, suggesting sampling of potential target sites, and reduction of Flt1 reduced transient contacts. Endothelial cells at target sites with elevated protrusive activity and/or reduced Flt1 were more likely to form stable connections with incoming sprouts. Target cells with reduced membrane-localized Flt1 (mFlt1), but not soluble Flt1, recapitulated the bias towards stable connections, suggesting that relative mFlt1 expression spatially influences selection of stable connections. Thus multiple sprout anastomosis parameters are regulated by VEGF signaling, and stable connections are spatially regulated by endothelial cell-intrinsic modulation of mFlt1, suggesting new ways to manipulate how vessel networks formation. Advisors/Committee Members: Nesmith, Jessica, Goldstein, Bob, Bautch, Victoria, Caron, Kathleen, Conlon, Frank, Liu, Jiandong.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nesmith, J. (2016). Investigation of Flt1 and VEGF signaling in connections during sprouting angiogenesis. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:fa212e56-c40b-4749-bdd2-ef1f2b289a1c

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nesmith, Jessica. “Investigation of Flt1 and VEGF signaling in connections during sprouting angiogenesis.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:fa212e56-c40b-4749-bdd2-ef1f2b289a1c.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nesmith, Jessica. “Investigation of Flt1 and VEGF signaling in connections during sprouting angiogenesis.” 2016. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Nesmith J. Investigation of Flt1 and VEGF signaling in connections during sprouting angiogenesis. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:fa212e56-c40b-4749-bdd2-ef1f2b289a1c.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Nesmith J. Investigation of Flt1 and VEGF signaling in connections during sprouting angiogenesis. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:fa212e56-c40b-4749-bdd2-ef1f2b289a1c

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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