Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Macy, Rebecca"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of North Carolina

1. Fraga, Cynthia M. The coping efforts of intimate partner violence survivors: review of the literature, exploratory inquiry, and scale development.

Degree: 2013, University of North Carolina

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant and prevalent social problem that impacts a considerable number of women each year. This often traumatic experience is strongly associated with a number of negative consequences affecting survivors' well-being. Fortunately, survivors' coping efforts have been shown to mitigate the impact of IPV on survivors' well-being. However, there is limited information regarding IPV as a distinct stressor, and the field is hampered by the lack of a comprehensive IPV-specific coping scale. The following three-paper dissertation addresses this critically important knowledge gap by contributing to the knowledge and measurement of coping among IPV survivors. The first paper provides a systematic and critical review of the literature on coping among female IPV survivors. The review identified 46 articles focused on survivors' coping experiences that met the study's criteria. This review highlighted what is known about IPV survivors' coping efforts as well as the methodological strengths and limitations of this literature. Further, this review found that coping has been conceptualized and measured in disparate and inconsistent ways across the reviewed articles. The second paper consists of a qualitative description study exploring IPV as a distinct stressor and the coping experiences of IPV survivors. Interview data from 6 IPV providers and 25 female survivors were analyzed using grounded theory techniques. Findings indicate that: (a) survivors use multiple and varied strategies to cope with IPV and IPV-related stress; (b) IPV survivors face multiple challenges and barriers in coping with the violence and stress in their lives; and (c) IPV is a unique stressor. The third paper presents the development and preliminary evaluation of an IPV-specific coping scale. Scale development was informed by theory, existing literature and measures, and interviews with IPV survivors and providers. Initial steps were taken to assess and enhance the scale's validity, including conducting an expert review (i.e., a review of the developed scale by a panel of experts on scale development, IPV, and coping) and cognitive interviewing with IPV survivors. Results from the expert review and cognitive interviewing were used to revise and refine the scale. Advisors/Committee Members: Fraga, Cynthia M., Macy, Rebecca.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Social Work

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fraga, C. M. (2013). The coping efforts of intimate partner violence survivors: review of the literature, exploratory inquiry, and scale development. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c1a6efd3-0582-4d71-8364-eb632de168f1

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fraga, Cynthia M. “The coping efforts of intimate partner violence survivors: review of the literature, exploratory inquiry, and scale development.” 2013. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c1a6efd3-0582-4d71-8364-eb632de168f1.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fraga, Cynthia M. “The coping efforts of intimate partner violence survivors: review of the literature, exploratory inquiry, and scale development.” 2013. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Fraga CM. The coping efforts of intimate partner violence survivors: review of the literature, exploratory inquiry, and scale development. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c1a6efd3-0582-4d71-8364-eb632de168f1.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Fraga CM. The coping efforts of intimate partner violence survivors: review of the literature, exploratory inquiry, and scale development. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c1a6efd3-0582-4d71-8364-eb632de168f1

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Li, Wen. Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina

An emerging literature suggests that video game addiction is increasingly prevalent among emerging adults; however, no evidence-based treatments for video game addiction have been identified. Mindfulness treatment shows positive effects for substance use and gambling disorders, and may be a promising intervention for video game addiction. However, mindfulness treatment has not, heretofore, been adapted and evaluated for video game addiction. To fill this gap, my three-paper dissertation involved adapting and pilot testing Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE) treatment for emerging adults with video game addiction using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design. The first paper includes a systematic review of 49 peer-reviewed journal articles evaluating mindfulness treatment for substance misuse. Meta-analytic results revealed significant small-to-large effects of mindfulness treatment in reducing levels of substance misuse, intensity of craving for psychoactive substances, and stress levels. Further, mindfulness treatments were effective in increasing abstinence from cigarette smoking and enhancing levels of mindfulness at posttreatment compared to alternative treatments. The second and third papers describe the development and evaluation of the adapted MORE treatment for video game addiction. The second paper presents a theoretical justification for mindfulness treatment of video game addiction and a study protocol for the RCT evaluating the adapted MORE treatment in emerging adults. The third paper reports the results of the RCT evaluating effects of MORE for emerging adults with video game addiction. Thirty adults (Mage = 25.0, SD = 5.4) with video game addiction were randomized to 8 weeks of group-based MORE or 8 weeks of a support group [SG]. Outcomes included signs and symptoms of video game addiction, craving for video game playing, video gaming-related maladaptive cognitions, perceived stress, coping, and mindfulness, and were measured at pre-and posttreatment using standardized self-report instruments. Analysis of covariance revealed that participation in MORE was associated with significantly greater reductions in signs and symptoms of video game addiction, intensity of craving for video game playing, and negative feelings related to video game playing, and a significantly greater increase in positive coping at posttreatment compared to the SG. Findings suggest that MORE is a promising intervention for emerging adults with video game addiction. Advisors/Committee Members: Li, Wen, Howard, Matthew O., Chapman, Mimi, Garland, Eric, Macy, Rebecca, Weems, Martha.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Social Work

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Li, W. (2016). Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:16d364f2-f9d2-4ce4-a941-90cb94890fe6

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Li, Wen. “Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:16d364f2-f9d2-4ce4-a941-90cb94890fe6.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Li, Wen. “Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults.” 2016. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Li W. Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:16d364f2-f9d2-4ce4-a941-90cb94890fe6.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Li W. Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:16d364f2-f9d2-4ce4-a941-90cb94890fe6

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

3. O'Brien, Jennifer. RISK FACTORS, PROTECTIVE FACTORS, AND IDENTIFICATION PRACTICES FOR SYSTEM-INVOLVED DOMESTIC MINOR SEX TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS.

Degree: 2017, University of North Carolina

Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking (DMST) is the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of US minors for the purposes of commercial sex. The prevalence of DMST is unknown; however, anecdotal and empirical evidence suggest that DMST victims/survivors often become clients in the child welfare and/or juvenile justice systems. Unfortunately, identification of survivors within these state-level systems is inconsistent, which limits available legal protections as well as potential treatment options. This three-paper dissertation contributes to the extant knowledge about system-involved DMST survivors by exploring risk factors, protective factors, and identification practices for this uniquely vulnerable group of youth. The first paper is a methodological research note describing the challenges of recruiting and collecting data from victims/survivors of DMST. In addition to detailed descriptions of the recruitment procedures used for this dissertation, the manuscript also reports the challenges, successes, and lessons learned through the participant recruitment process. Recommendations for future research and recruitment protocols are provided. The second paper presents exploratory qualitative findings regarding service provider and DMST victim/survivor de facto definitions of DMST. This manuscript also explores ways in which victim/survivor and service provider definitions are different from and/or similar to extant federal and state legal definitions. Such differences may impact current DMST victim/survivor identification procedures, and shed light on reasons why current victim/survivor identification is- at best- inconsistent. Qualitative content analysis revealed important differences between DMST victim/survivor and service provider definitions of DMST as well as several important differences between participants’ definitions of DMST and extant federal and state legal definitions of DMST. Implications for policy, practice, and identification protocols are discussed. The third paper explores the role of interpersonal relationship in the lives of system-involved DMST survivors from the perspectives of DMST survivors and experienced DMST service providers. Qualitative interviews with DMST victims/survivors and experienced service providers indicate that interpersonal relationships may promote risk, provide protection, and foster resiliency against initial and/or ongoing sexual exploitation. Findings provide a context for understanding the role of interpersonal relationships in the lives of DMST survivors as well as point to directions for future intervention development. Advisors/Committee Members: O'Brien, Jennifer, Macy, Rebecca, Busch-Armendariz, Noël, Duncan, Dean, Lanier, Paul, Rizo, Cynthia, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Social Work

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

O'Brien, J. (2017). RISK FACTORS, PROTECTIVE FACTORS, AND IDENTIFICATION PRACTICES FOR SYSTEM-INVOLVED DOMESTIC MINOR SEX TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2da5360e-bd89-40f8-8702-8f1777836c89

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

O'Brien, Jennifer. “RISK FACTORS, PROTECTIVE FACTORS, AND IDENTIFICATION PRACTICES FOR SYSTEM-INVOLVED DOMESTIC MINOR SEX TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS.” 2017. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2da5360e-bd89-40f8-8702-8f1777836c89.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

O'Brien, Jennifer. “RISK FACTORS, PROTECTIVE FACTORS, AND IDENTIFICATION PRACTICES FOR SYSTEM-INVOLVED DOMESTIC MINOR SEX TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS.” 2017. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

O'Brien J. RISK FACTORS, PROTECTIVE FACTORS, AND IDENTIFICATION PRACTICES FOR SYSTEM-INVOLVED DOMESTIC MINOR SEX TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2da5360e-bd89-40f8-8702-8f1777836c89.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

O'Brien J. RISK FACTORS, PROTECTIVE FACTORS, AND IDENTIFICATION PRACTICES FOR SYSTEM-INVOLVED DOMESTIC MINOR SEX TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2da5360e-bd89-40f8-8702-8f1777836c89

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.