Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Lazard, Allison"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of North Carolina

1. Puglia, Deanna. Social Media Use and Its Impact on Body Image: The Effects of Body Comparison Tendency, Motivation for Social Media Use, and Social Media Platform on Body Esteem in Young Women.

Degree: 2017, University of North Carolina

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of social media use on body esteem in young women. Through a self-report survey of college women (n=339), it was found that body comparison tendency was negatively correlated with body esteem and positively correlated with the motivation to use social media for body comparisons (both p<.01). This study also provided an exploratory investigation (n=58) of the impact that different social media platforms have on body satisfaction. Of the platforms examined, Facebook showed the largest negative correlation with body satisfaction (r=-.204). Participants who engaged in higher levels of Facebook use also displayed significantly lower body satisfaction than those with lower Facebook use (p<.05). This study suggests that social media is a new avenue for individuals to engage in maladaptive body comparison processes, creating a need for health communication and behavior change interventions that address this issue, especially among vulnerable populations. Advisors/Committee Members: Puglia, Deanna, Noar, Seth, Lazard, Allison, Widman, Laura.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Media and Journalism; Mass Communication Graduate Program

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Puglia, D. (2017). Social Media Use and Its Impact on Body Image: The Effects of Body Comparison Tendency, Motivation for Social Media Use, and Social Media Platform on Body Esteem in Young Women. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:82b9b151-0a47-433e-af1f-ad49c44d7406

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Puglia, Deanna. “Social Media Use and Its Impact on Body Image: The Effects of Body Comparison Tendency, Motivation for Social Media Use, and Social Media Platform on Body Esteem in Young Women.” 2017. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:82b9b151-0a47-433e-af1f-ad49c44d7406.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Puglia, Deanna. “Social Media Use and Its Impact on Body Image: The Effects of Body Comparison Tendency, Motivation for Social Media Use, and Social Media Platform on Body Esteem in Young Women.” 2017. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Puglia D. Social Media Use and Its Impact on Body Image: The Effects of Body Comparison Tendency, Motivation for Social Media Use, and Social Media Platform on Body Esteem in Young Women. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:82b9b151-0a47-433e-af1f-ad49c44d7406.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Puglia D. Social Media Use and Its Impact on Body Image: The Effects of Body Comparison Tendency, Motivation for Social Media Use, and Social Media Platform on Body Esteem in Young Women. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:82b9b151-0a47-433e-af1f-ad49c44d7406

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Sontag, Jennah. The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication.

Degree: 2017, University of North Carolina

Text and visual frames in health-related messages can influence the emotions and perceptions of viewers based on what is emphasized in these two frames, which can determine whether viewers will avoid or heed the message. Two separate experimental studies investigated the effectiveness of text and visual frames in depression messages. Study 1 tested three specific visual frames: suffering, treatment, and recovery. Study 2 tested the interaction of gain and loss text frames and positive (i.e. recovery) and negative (i.e. suffering) visual frames. In both studies, participants were randomly assigned to message conditions; Study 1’s suffering, treatment, and recovery message conditions, and Study 2’s gain text with positive visual frame, gain text with negative visual frame, loss text with positive visual frame, and loss text with negative visual frame conditions. Participants viewed three messages each, then answered questions pertaining to emotion, stigma, identity, perceived behavioral attainment, aspiration, and other behavior predictors. The recovery/positive visual frames elicited positive emotion and increased viewers’ aspiration to be like the exemplars depicted in the messages significantly (p<.001) more than the treatment and suffering/negative visual frames. Depictions of recovery imply that those who seek help will improve their lifestyle; therefore, viewers who aspire to be like the individuals depicted are more likely to seek help in order to attain the same positive experiences as those depicted. Suffering/negative visual frames elicited significantly greater negative emotion and decreased aspiration (p<.001). A path analysis also revealed that positive emotion mediated the relationship between recovery/positive visual frames and aspiration. There were no significant differences in outcomes for text frames except for emotion; gain text frames elicited significantly greater (p<.001) positive emotion, while loss text frames elicited negative emotion (p<.001). Based on these findings, it is suggested that message designers consider how negatively framed visuals may deter individuals from heeding the message, while using exemplars that inspire viewers through recovery-related depictions may more effectively motivate individuals to seek help when they experience depressive symptoms. Implications beyond the context of depression are discussed, along with study limitations and suggestions for future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Sontag, Jennah, Lazard, Allison, Noar, Seth, Clayton, Russell, Comello, Nori, Chapman, Mimi.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Media and Journalism; Mass Communication Graduate Program

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sontag, J. (2017). The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3dc8f3de-c98f-4199-afc9-b1f68ca07097

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sontag, Jennah. “The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication.” 2017. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3dc8f3de-c98f-4199-afc9-b1f68ca07097.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sontag, Jennah. “The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication.” 2017. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Sontag J. The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3dc8f3de-c98f-4199-afc9-b1f68ca07097.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sontag J. The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3dc8f3de-c98f-4199-afc9-b1f68ca07097

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

3. Baig, Sabeeh. Examining Perceived Message Effectiveness as a Marker for the Impact of Brief Health Behavior Interventions.

Degree: Health Behavior, 2019, University of North Carolina

Introduction. Interventionists often select health communication messages based on audience ratings of perceived message effectiveness (PME). I sought to examine the roles of message perceptions (persuasive potential) and effects perceptions (potential for behavior change), two types of PME, in message selection using anti-smoking messages about cigarette smoke chemicals (chemical messages) as a case study. Methods. In three papers, I examined several aspects of the validity of the UNC PME Scale focusing on effects perceptions. The first paper used data from three national samples of adults (n = 999 and n = 1,692) and adolescents (n = 869). The second and third papers used data from a three-week trial of the impact of chemical messages among 703 U.S. adult smokers. At the final visit, a survey assessed message perceptions, effects perceptions, quitting behaviors and quitting antecedents drawn from the UNC Tobacco Warnings Model (TWM). Results. In the first paper, the UNC PME Scale demonstrated strong psychometric properties in diverse populations and across varied chemical messages. In the second paper, message perceptions demonstrated predictive validity only with an early behavioral antecedent from the TWM (attention to the message). However, effects perceptions demonstrated predictive validity with four later antecedents from the TWM: negative affect; thinking about the chemicals in cigarette smoke, or harms of smoking; and quit intentions. Effects perceptions also demonstrated predictive validity with butting out or forgoing a cigarette and quit attempts. In the third paper, effects perceptions, but not message perceptions, mediated the impact of chemical messages on these three quitting behaviors, although the corresponding effect sizes were small to medium. Conclusions. Effects perceptions, but not message perceptions, were a proxy for chemical messages’ impact on three quitting behaviors. This finding supports the diagnostic value of effects perceptions in formative research on messages seeking to change smoking and, potentially, other behaviors. The distinct patterns of predictive validity further suggest that effects perceptions are more relevant to behavior change than message perceptions. Advisors/Committee Members: Baig, Sabeeh, Brewer, Noel, Gottfredson, Nisha, Lazard, Allison, Noar, Seth, Ribisl, Kurt.

Subjects/Keywords: Gillings School of Global Public Health; Department of Health Behavior

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Baig, S. (2019). Examining Perceived Message Effectiveness as a Marker for the Impact of Brief Health Behavior Interventions. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7626fedd-dae2-429f-babd-a8c66e7d84a4

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Baig, Sabeeh. “Examining Perceived Message Effectiveness as a Marker for the Impact of Brief Health Behavior Interventions.” 2019. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7626fedd-dae2-429f-babd-a8c66e7d84a4.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Baig, Sabeeh. “Examining Perceived Message Effectiveness as a Marker for the Impact of Brief Health Behavior Interventions.” 2019. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Baig S. Examining Perceived Message Effectiveness as a Marker for the Impact of Brief Health Behavior Interventions. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7626fedd-dae2-429f-babd-a8c66e7d84a4.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Baig S. Examining Perceived Message Effectiveness as a Marker for the Impact of Brief Health Behavior Interventions. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2019. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7626fedd-dae2-429f-babd-a8c66e7d84a4

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.