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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Knapp, Darin"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Salling, Michael C. A Role for CaMKII and ERK1/2 Pathways in Alcohol Self-Administration and Relapse-like Behavior.

Degree: 2011, University of North Carolina

Alcoholism is a debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder that adversely affects many people worldwide. Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms that cause alcohol addiction is paramount to its treatment. New evidence suggests that addictive behaviors emerge as a result of plastic changes in the neural circuitry that mediates drug reinforcement and reward-learning. The goal of this dissertation was to identify changes in neuroplasticity-related proteins following alcohol consumption in areas of the brain that mediate alcohol reward. Initially, we analyzed the amygdala proteome following chronic alcohol consumption and found 26 proteins that showed differential protein expression. Several of these proteins are involved in synaptic plasticity including CaMKII[alpha], a protein kinase that modulates receptor activity and is required for the induction of long-term synaptic plasticity. We further characterized CaMKII expression in the amygdala, and found that it is specifically increased in the central and lateral amygdala following twenty-eight days of alcohol-drinking at the start of the dark cycle when there were no detectable blood alcohol levels. Consistent with CaMKII's role in AMPAR trafficking, we found a concomitant increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio in the central amygdala. We extended these findings by measuring CaMKII expression following operant self-administration and found that phosphorylated CaMKII was increased in the amygdala of alcohol-drinking mice. To determine if increased CaMKII activation played a role in alcohol's reinforcing properties, we infused CaMKII inhibitors into the amygdala prior to self-administration sessions. We found that CaMKII inhibition attenuates alcohol but not sucrose operant self-administration and concluded that CaMKII activity in the amygdala functionally regulates the reinforcing properties of alcohol. Lastly, we developed a mouse protocol for relapse-like behavior and tested the role of ERK1/2, a protein kinase that plays a role in plasticity, in relapse-like behavior. We found that inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation potentiates cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol-seeking and induces sucrose-seeking. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate that inhibiting the activity of protein kinases that are involved in synaptic plasticity can affect alcohol-related behaviors in a reinforcer-specific manner and suggest that modulating these pathways has the potential for pharmacotherapeutic intervention in alcoholics. Advisors/Committee Members: Salling, Michael C., Knapp, Darin.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; UNC Neuroscience Center; Neuroscience Curriculum

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Salling, M. C. (2011). A Role for CaMKII and ERK1/2 Pathways in Alcohol Self-Administration and Relapse-like Behavior. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d623a867-9100-4ded-b4cc-cc00aa9de688

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Salling, Michael C. “A Role for CaMKII and ERK1/2 Pathways in Alcohol Self-Administration and Relapse-like Behavior.” 2011. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d623a867-9100-4ded-b4cc-cc00aa9de688.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Salling, Michael C. “A Role for CaMKII and ERK1/2 Pathways in Alcohol Self-Administration and Relapse-like Behavior.” 2011. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Salling MC. A Role for CaMKII and ERK1/2 Pathways in Alcohol Self-Administration and Relapse-like Behavior. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2011. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d623a867-9100-4ded-b4cc-cc00aa9de688.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Salling MC. A Role for CaMKII and ERK1/2 Pathways in Alcohol Self-Administration and Relapse-like Behavior. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2011. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d623a867-9100-4ded-b4cc-cc00aa9de688

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Jaramillo, Anel. Examination of Cortical/Thalamic-Striatal Circuitry in Modulating Sensitivity to Alcohol and Relapse.

Degree: 2017, University of North Carolina

All drugs of abuse produce unique interoceptive/subjective (i.e., discriminative stimulus) effects that can impact drug-taking, seeking, and relapse in both clinical and pre-clinical studies. However, the neural circuitry modulating the interoceptive effects of alcohol has yet to be established. The nucleus accumbens core (AcbC), a region known to modulate alcohol-related behaviors, also plays a central role in modulating the discriminative stimulus effects of alcohol. Thus, by investigating the insular cortex (IC) and rhomboid thalamic nucleus (Rh), two brain regions with projections to the AcbC, the experiments in this dissertation sought to investigate the circuitry underlying alcohol-induced interoceptive states and how those internal cues can modulate alcohol-seeking and relapse-like drinking. The IC is implicated in processing interoceptive cues and responding to alcohol-related cues, although its functional role in modulating alcohol-induced interoceptive effects has not been investigated to date. The Rh is proposed to modulate inhibition, behavior flexibility, and motivation, but the role of Rh in modulating any drug-related behaviors has yet to be determined. Utilizing an alcohol discrimination task, pharmacological inhibition of the IC or Rh produced partial alcohol-like effects. Furthermore chemogenetic silencing of the IC or Rh and specific silencing of the IC or Rh outgoing projections to the AcbC potentiated the interoceptive effects of alcohol. Interestingly, in a model of moderate alcohol self-administration, chemogenetic silencing of all IC and Rh outgoing projections did not affect maintenance or reinstatement of alcohol self-administration or the alcohol loading dose effect. However, chemogenetic silencing of IC to AcbC projections decreased alcohol self-administration and increased sensitivity to an alcohol loading dose (i.e., satiation), resulting in attenuated maintenance and reinstatement of alcohol self-administration. Interestingly chemogenetic silencing of the IC outgoing projections and specific IC to AcbC projections did not affect ongoing sucrose self-administration, but did affect relapse-like behavior. Overall, results from the studies within the present dissertation provide a novel role for the insular/thalamic-striatal circuit in modulating sensitivity to alcohol and implicate the insular-striatal circuit in modulating the alcohol-reinforced behavior, while demonstrating the complex role of interoceptive effects in modulating on alcohol-related behaviors. Advisors/Committee Members: Jaramillo, Anel, Besheer, Joyce, Morrow, A. Leslie, Kash, Thomas, Knapp, Darin, Parnell, Scott.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; UNC Neuroscience Center; Neuroscience Curriculum

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jaramillo, A. (2017). Examination of Cortical/Thalamic-Striatal Circuitry in Modulating Sensitivity to Alcohol and Relapse. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:b7f35c1a-3dd6-4628-ae85-dd40714fb83e

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jaramillo, Anel. “Examination of Cortical/Thalamic-Striatal Circuitry in Modulating Sensitivity to Alcohol and Relapse.” 2017. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:b7f35c1a-3dd6-4628-ae85-dd40714fb83e.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jaramillo, Anel. “Examination of Cortical/Thalamic-Striatal Circuitry in Modulating Sensitivity to Alcohol and Relapse.” 2017. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Jaramillo A. Examination of Cortical/Thalamic-Striatal Circuitry in Modulating Sensitivity to Alcohol and Relapse. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:b7f35c1a-3dd6-4628-ae85-dd40714fb83e.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jaramillo A. Examination of Cortical/Thalamic-Striatal Circuitry in Modulating Sensitivity to Alcohol and Relapse. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:b7f35c1a-3dd6-4628-ae85-dd40714fb83e

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

3. Weber, Mariko. Cognitive Control and Affective Processing Dysregulation in Veterans with Comorbid PTSD and mTBI: an fMRI Study.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina

Mariko Frances Weber: Cognitive Control and Affective Processing Dysregulation in Veterans with Comorbid PTSD and mTBI: an fMRI Study (Under the direction of Aysenil Belger) Background: Deficits in cognitive control and affective processing are important aspects of comorbid PTSD and mTBI for which there are no effective treatments. Understanding the neural basis of symptoms and domain specific deficits is an important step in developing therapies for treating individuals with PTSD-mTBI. No studies have addressed this question, as most have examined PTSD or mTBI separately. We therefore utilize a large functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) dataset to test the relationship between individual symptom severity, neurocognitive deficits and task-based functional activation. Methods: The relationship between the severity of clinical symptoms and neurocognitive deficits in patients with PTSD-mTBI and functional activation during an affective 1-back task, affective face matching task, and number Stroop task (n = 100) was assessed using correlation analysis. Results: Activity in cortico-limbic regions, and regions associated with striatal, default mode, and salience networks were found to be significantly associated with increased symptom severity and greater impairments in neurocognition. Discussion: Our findings suggest that researchers and clinicians should examine individuals neural and symptom profiles before making a treatment decision and that unique variable associations should be the focus rather than the average of the group as a whole. Furthermore, our results indicate a relationship between functional activity and clinical symptoms and neurocognitive deficits that suggest network level regional contribution to diagnoses, as well as greater resting baseline activity that is associated with increased symptom severity. Advisors/Committee Members: Weber, Mariko, Belger, Aysenil, Giovanello, Kelly, Knapp, Darin, Knickmeyer, Rebecca, Morey, Rajendra, Johnson, Jacqueline.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; UNC Neuroscience Center; Neuroscience Curriculum

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Weber, M. (2016). Cognitive Control and Affective Processing Dysregulation in Veterans with Comorbid PTSD and mTBI: an fMRI Study. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:cd06444f-2aa5-4e48-98af-87a579587d49

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Weber, Mariko. “Cognitive Control and Affective Processing Dysregulation in Veterans with Comorbid PTSD and mTBI: an fMRI Study.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed December 05, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:cd06444f-2aa5-4e48-98af-87a579587d49.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Weber, Mariko. “Cognitive Control and Affective Processing Dysregulation in Veterans with Comorbid PTSD and mTBI: an fMRI Study.” 2016. Web. 05 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Weber M. Cognitive Control and Affective Processing Dysregulation in Veterans with Comorbid PTSD and mTBI: an fMRI Study. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2020 Dec 05]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:cd06444f-2aa5-4e48-98af-87a579587d49.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Weber M. Cognitive Control and Affective Processing Dysregulation in Veterans with Comorbid PTSD and mTBI: an fMRI Study. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:cd06444f-2aa5-4e48-98af-87a579587d49

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.