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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Jones, Shannon"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Jones, Shannon. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of the Smallest Flying Insects.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina

The flight of insects has fascinated scientists for centuries, and a large body of work has focused on understanding the intricacies of the aerodynamics of these organisms. Most of this work has focused on the flight of insects ranging in size from a fruit fly to a hawkmoth. The smallest flying insects, however, are ten times smaller than a fruit fly, and much less is known about their wing kinematics and aerodynamics. These insects fly at Reynolds numbers on the order of 10, and at this scale relative viscous forces are much greater than they are for larger insects. Consequently, these small insects must overcome significant aerodynamic challenges in order to propel themselves. The main goal of this dissertation is to better understand the challenges of flying at low Reynolds numbers and to investigate possible mechanisms to overcome those challenges. I used the immersed boundary method to solve for the fluid flow around insect wings in both two- and three-dimensions. In Chapter 3, I use a two-dimensional model to explore theoretically whether small insects could “swim” through the air using a drag-based stroke mechanism to generate vertical force. Chapter 4 investigates the aerodynamic role of bristled wings, especially engaged in wing-wing interactions. And finally, Chapter 5 introduces a three-dimensional revolving wing which is used to explore the forces and flow structures generated at low Reynolds numbers. Overall, the results suggest that there are drastic differences in the aerodynamics of flight at the scale of the smallest flying insects, which makes their flight more challenging, compared to larger insects. As the Reynolds number decreases, drag increases and the lift-to-drag ratio decreases significantly. Chapter 3 reveals that neither lift- nor drag-based vertical force generation mechanisms are very efficient at the range of the smallest flying insects. Chapter 4 demonstrates that bristled wings could reduce the force required to fling the wings apart during clap and fling while still maintaining lift during translation. And Chapter 5 shows that both the leading edge vortex and trailing edge vortex remain attached to the wing and spanwise flow decreases as the Reynolds number is lowered. Advisors/Committee Members: Jones, Shannon, Miller, Laura, Hedrick, Tyson, Kier, William, Forest, M. Gregory, Prins, Jan.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Curriculum in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jones, S. (2016). A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of the Smallest Flying Insects. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2c1ef7a7-f6ac-41ef-adb1-d16cd7cbeae1

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jones, Shannon. “A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of the Smallest Flying Insects.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed December 03, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2c1ef7a7-f6ac-41ef-adb1-d16cd7cbeae1.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jones, Shannon. “A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of the Smallest Flying Insects.” 2016. Web. 03 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Jones S. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of the Smallest Flying Insects. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2020 Dec 03]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2c1ef7a7-f6ac-41ef-adb1-d16cd7cbeae1.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jones S. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of the Smallest Flying Insects. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2c1ef7a7-f6ac-41ef-adb1-d16cd7cbeae1

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Jones, Shannon Zenia. The Identification of Novel Mechanisms to Regulate B cell Responses During Adaptive Immunity.

Degree: 2012, University of North Carolina

Initiation of the germinal center reaction during T-dependent adaptive immune responses gives rise to long-lived plasma cells (PCs) that produce high affinity, class switched antibodies. It also produces memory B cells to ensure a rapid, high affinity response to future pathogen exposure. Long-lived antibody and memory B cell responses underlie the success of vaccines and provide the host with durable, long-lasting protection from infectious disease. Although, the formation and maintenance of memory B cells and plasma cells are of critical importance, the mechanisms regulating these processes are poorly understood. Our lab has been interested in understanding the role of dendritic cells in regulating the germinal center reaction and adaptive immune response. We found that the formation of antigen/antibody immune complexes stimulate dendritic cells, through CD16 (FcgRIII), to secrete BAFF, a cytokine required initiation and maintenance of the germinal center as well as the formation of memory B cells. Specifically, our results indicate that DC-derived BAFF initially impacts the formation of T follicular helper cells, which are critical in seeding and initiating the germinal center response. Studies show that upon immunization with a T-dependent antigen, mice that lack CD16 expression, as well as mice lacking BAFF production by hematopoeitic cells, display reduced numbers of T follicular helper cells, and as consequence, reduced germinal center number and size. Correlated with this deficit in germinal centers, these mice also display attenuated secondary immune responses, and fewer numbers of antigen-experienced memory B cells. This suggests that DCs and BAFF play a key role in germinal center dynamics and subsequent memory B cell formation and function. Collectively, our data highlight an additional role for BAFF in the initiation and maintenance of T-dependent adaptive immune responses. Advisors/Committee Members: Jones, Shannon Zenia, Vilen, Barbara J., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Curriculum in Toxicology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jones, S. Z. (2012). The Identification of Novel Mechanisms to Regulate B cell Responses During Adaptive Immunity. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:574f1a68-0b2c-4abf-b2ba-04f861ad2c68

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jones, Shannon Zenia. “The Identification of Novel Mechanisms to Regulate B cell Responses During Adaptive Immunity.” 2012. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed December 03, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:574f1a68-0b2c-4abf-b2ba-04f861ad2c68.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jones, Shannon Zenia. “The Identification of Novel Mechanisms to Regulate B cell Responses During Adaptive Immunity.” 2012. Web. 03 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Jones SZ. The Identification of Novel Mechanisms to Regulate B cell Responses During Adaptive Immunity. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2012. [cited 2020 Dec 03]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:574f1a68-0b2c-4abf-b2ba-04f861ad2c68.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jones SZ. The Identification of Novel Mechanisms to Regulate B cell Responses During Adaptive Immunity. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2012. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:574f1a68-0b2c-4abf-b2ba-04f861ad2c68

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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