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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Hernandez, Michelle"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Orgel, Kelly. Advances in Treatments and Animal Models of Peanut Allergy.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2018, University of North Carolina

Food allergies are a growing health concern affecting approximately 6-8% of the US population. In particular, peanut allergy has an estimated prevalence of greater than 1% of the population and is uncommonly outgrown, making it a life-long disease. Ingestion of allergens can lead to a variety of allergic symptoms ranging from hives or gastrointestinal symptoms to constriction of the airways and anaphylactic shock. Because there is currently no FDA-approved treatment for food allergy, these patients are managed with education and strict allergen avoidance. However, even with the most careful avoidance, accidental ingestion does occur and can lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis. As a result, treatment options are needed. Treatments currently under investigation in clinical trials include peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT), sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), and epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT), though mechanisms of these therapies remain unclear. While results from these trials are promising, limitations include daily dosing, adverse effects, and limited long-term efficacy after therapy is discontinued. Thus, there remains an urgent need for improved therapy options. The work in this dissertation provides the foundation for future drug discovery. First, IgG-mediated basophil inhibition was elucidated as a mechanism of OIT and SLIT and was shown to be associated with long-lived protection. Understanding this mechanism further may result in a targeted therapy option. Separately, a therapy targeting inhibitory receptors on antigen-specific B cells was developed for the prevention of sensitization in a mouse model of peanut allergy. Unfortunately, understanding of food allergy etiology and advances in treatment options has been limited by the lack of an animal model that accurately recapitulates the human disease. Here, we describe the use of the genetically diverse Collaborative Cross to identify CC027/GeniUnc as a more relevant mouse strain that exhibits a severe reaction following oral sensitization and challenge. Together, this work provides a platform for better understanding the mechanisms of food allergy and its treatments, as well as the development of new therapies. Advisors/Committee Members: Orgel, Kelly, Burks, Wesley, Kulis, Michael, Major, Ben, Gilliland, Kurt, Hernandez, Michelle, Su, Maureen, Deshmukh, Mohanish.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Orgel, K. (2018). Advances in Treatments and Animal Models of Peanut Allergy. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d7fad2d6-7f70-4e8a-9a06-f50aa2902145

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Orgel, Kelly. “Advances in Treatments and Animal Models of Peanut Allergy.” 2018. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 23, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d7fad2d6-7f70-4e8a-9a06-f50aa2902145.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Orgel, Kelly. “Advances in Treatments and Animal Models of Peanut Allergy.” 2018. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Orgel K. Advances in Treatments and Animal Models of Peanut Allergy. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2018. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d7fad2d6-7f70-4e8a-9a06-f50aa2902145.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Orgel K. Advances in Treatments and Animal Models of Peanut Allergy. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2018. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d7fad2d6-7f70-4e8a-9a06-f50aa2902145

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Gaetz, Kim. Free to Breathe, Free to Teach: Indoor Air Quality in Schools and Respiratory Health of Teachers.

Degree: Epidemiology, 2014, University of North Carolina

Controlling indoor dampness can be challenging for schools, especially in the warm and humid southeastern United States. Failure to control indoor humidity directly impacts air quality, and indirectly may lead to problems with mold and dust mites and infestations by roaches and rodents. These potential allergens can trigger adverse health effects in school building occupants, especially in teachers who may work in one building for many years. Our first aim was to describe the problem of relative humidity (RH) control in schools and to examine associations between building-related factors and RH control. Our second aim was to estimate the risk of asthma and cold/allergy symptoms among teachers exposed to high (>50%) and low (<30%) compared to recommended (30-50%) humidity levels in their classrooms. We measured daily symptoms from a cohort of 122 teachers from 10 schools in two NC school districts. We logged RH every 15 minutes in 134 classrooms (n= 852,519 observations) and recorded information on building-related factors. Polytomous logistic regression was used to quantify associations between these structural factors and average daily RH below, within, or above the recommended level of 30-50%. Symptom data were analyzed using modified Poisson regression models for correlated binary outcomes, clustered by classroom. The odds of high RH (>50%) were 6.64 (3.96, 11.12) times higher for classrooms with annual vs. quarterly heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system maintenance. The odds of high RH were also 3.07(2.04, 4.63) times higher for classrooms in buildings with an economizer vs. none. During occupied time periods, the odds of high RH in classrooms with programmed thermostat setbacks were 3.48 (1.89, 6.38) times the odds of those with no setbacks. Among those present in the school building, the risks of asthma symptoms were slightly elevated for participants in classrooms with low vs. recommended RH [risk ratio (RR)=1.09 (0.84, 1.35)] or high vs. recommended RH [RR=1.09 (0.84, 1.35)]. Atopy at baseline and presence in the school building were independently associated with asthma and cold/allergy symptoms. These findings suggest practical remedies for poor air quality in schools and highlight the effects of indoor air quality on teachers' health. Advisors/Committee Members: Gaetz, Kim, Richardson, David, Hernandez, Michelle, Lipton, David, Marshall, Stephen, Wing, Steve.

Subjects/Keywords: Epidemiology; Industrial safety; Environmental health; Gillings School of Global Public Health; Department of Epidemiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gaetz, K. (2014). Free to Breathe, Free to Teach: Indoor Air Quality in Schools and Respiratory Health of Teachers. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:264081cf-0f2c-43a5-b290-879283718354

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gaetz, Kim. “Free to Breathe, Free to Teach: Indoor Air Quality in Schools and Respiratory Health of Teachers.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 23, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:264081cf-0f2c-43a5-b290-879283718354.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gaetz, Kim. “Free to Breathe, Free to Teach: Indoor Air Quality in Schools and Respiratory Health of Teachers.” 2014. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Gaetz K. Free to Breathe, Free to Teach: Indoor Air Quality in Schools and Respiratory Health of Teachers. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:264081cf-0f2c-43a5-b290-879283718354.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gaetz K. Free to Breathe, Free to Teach: Indoor Air Quality in Schools and Respiratory Health of Teachers. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:264081cf-0f2c-43a5-b290-879283718354

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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