Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Henning, Susan"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of North Carolina

1. Zwarycz, Bailey. EXTRINSIC REGULATION OF INTESTINAL STEM CELL PROLIFERATION AND DIFFERENTIATION BY NICHE COMPONENTS.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2018, University of North Carolina

The small intestinal epithelium facilitates the absorption of nutrients and provides a barrier against damaging toxins, indigestible contents, and microbes in the intestinal lumen. The epithelium is maintained by a pool of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that reside at the base of the crypt in a supportive niche environment, made up of both cellular and non-cellular components. Niche cells, including epithelial Paneth cells, subepithelial myofibroblasts, and immune cells, along with the non-cellular extracellular matrix (ECM) provide cues that promote ISC proliferation and differentiation. The niche environment is complex and dynamic, with various cell types present that secrete different growth factors and cytokines in response to intestinal damage, inflammation, and regeneration. Extrinsic niche factors are integral for the survival and proliferation of ISCs; therefore, understanding the influence of individual niche components on ISC behavior is essential for the development of therapeutics for patient health. Here, two components of the ISC niche are investigated for their influence on ISC proliferation and differentiation: cytokines secreted from local immune cells and the underlying ECM scaffold. Through a screen of inflammatory bowel disease-related cytokines, Interleukin 22 demonstrated a concentration-dependent effect on ileal organoid size and survival in vitro. Elevated levels of Interleukin 22 limited ISC expansion in favor of increased progenitor cell differentiation and proliferation, resulting in increased organoids size and expression of antimicrobial gene products. ISC cultures rely on the use of non-intestinal based ECM components for the survival of ISCs in vitro. Using a natural, acellular intestinal scaffold provides a more physiologically relevant substrate for use both in vitro culture systems and for tissue engineering applications. By optimizing decellularization techniques, an acellular porcine small intestinal scaffold was created that retained mucosal architecture, preserved key ECM components, and supported the proliferation and differentiation of mouse small intestinal epithelium. Together, these to findings further the understanding of how extrinsic factors from the niche influence ISCs, which is of particular importance when developing therapies for intestinal disease. Advisors/Committee Members: Zwarycz, Bailey, Otey, Carol, Magness, Scott, Henning, Susan, Burridge, Keith, Major, Michael, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zwarycz, B. (2018). EXTRINSIC REGULATION OF INTESTINAL STEM CELL PROLIFERATION AND DIFFERENTIATION BY NICHE COMPONENTS. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:60ffa5d1-d9d6-4d7a-bf12-d68d7c878011

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zwarycz, Bailey. “EXTRINSIC REGULATION OF INTESTINAL STEM CELL PROLIFERATION AND DIFFERENTIATION BY NICHE COMPONENTS.” 2018. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 23, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:60ffa5d1-d9d6-4d7a-bf12-d68d7c878011.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zwarycz, Bailey. “EXTRINSIC REGULATION OF INTESTINAL STEM CELL PROLIFERATION AND DIFFERENTIATION BY NICHE COMPONENTS.” 2018. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Zwarycz B. EXTRINSIC REGULATION OF INTESTINAL STEM CELL PROLIFERATION AND DIFFERENTIATION BY NICHE COMPONENTS. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2018. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:60ffa5d1-d9d6-4d7a-bf12-d68d7c878011.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Zwarycz B. EXTRINSIC REGULATION OF INTESTINAL STEM CELL PROLIFERATION AND DIFFERENTIATION BY NICHE COMPONENTS. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2018. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:60ffa5d1-d9d6-4d7a-bf12-d68d7c878011

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. von Furstenberg, Richard Joseph. Side Population Sorting Separates Subfractions of Intestinal Stem Cells.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2013, University of North Carolina

The existence of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) which generate the epithelium has been recognized for over three decades. Recent work suggests there are two distinct ISC populations: active ISCs which are important for epithelial homeostasis, and quiescent ISCs that drive proliferation after injury. Although quiescent ISCs may be of greater therapeutic use, to date, isolation of this population has been achieved only with fluorescent reporter mice. My goal was to identify an isolation method for both ISC populations that can be used in wild-type mice and eventually humans. In the following experiments I use side population (SP) sorting to demonstrate that the USP: contains reporter cells of the active ISC, is highly proliferative by S phase analysis, and expresses high levels of the known active ISC transcripts. In contrast the LSP is: non-proliferative, de-enriched for active ISC transcripts, and enriched for those of quiescent ISCs. Advisors/Committee Members: von Furstenberg, Richard Joseph, Henning, Susan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

von Furstenberg, R. J. (2013). Side Population Sorting Separates Subfractions of Intestinal Stem Cells. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:62403b60-b17b-4227-9c55-e3a90d4f4a03

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

von Furstenberg, Richard Joseph. “Side Population Sorting Separates Subfractions of Intestinal Stem Cells.” 2013. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 23, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:62403b60-b17b-4227-9c55-e3a90d4f4a03.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

von Furstenberg, Richard Joseph. “Side Population Sorting Separates Subfractions of Intestinal Stem Cells.” 2013. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

von Furstenberg RJ. Side Population Sorting Separates Subfractions of Intestinal Stem Cells. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:62403b60-b17b-4227-9c55-e3a90d4f4a03.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

von Furstenberg RJ. Side Population Sorting Separates Subfractions of Intestinal Stem Cells. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:62403b60-b17b-4227-9c55-e3a90d4f4a03

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

3. Roche, Kyle. Intrinsic regulation of quiescence and radioresistance in intestinal stem cells.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2016, University of North Carolina

The intestinal epithelium regenerates every 5-7 days, a process that is facilitated by a pool of intestinal stem cells. Over the past decade, it has become apparent that the intestinal stem cell pool is diverse, containing at least two populations. Active stem cells (aISCs) are moderately proliferative and contribute to homeostatic regeneration, while reserve stem cells (rISCs) are slowly proliferative and facilitate regeneration following damage-induced loss of the aISC population. The genetic mechanisms required for the production and maintenance of rISCs are unknown. Sox9 is a transcription factor that has been shown to maintain stem cell populations in various tissues. In the intestinal epithelium, Sox9 is expressed in a gradient that negatively correlates with proliferative capacity. Transit-amplifying progenitors express the lowest levels of Sox9, while aISCs express intermediate levels, and cells expressing the highest levels of Sox9 are consistent with slowly cycling rISCs. In this dissertation, I will address the role that Sox9 plays in maintaining rISC function within the intestinal epithelium. I find that Sox9 is not only necessary for the production of a quiescent rISCs, but that it is also uniformly necessary for maintaining radioresistance within the rISC pool. This work identifies Sox9 as a novel intrinsic regulator of the rISC state. Advisors/Committee Members: Roche, Kyle, Otey, Carol, Magness, Scott, Sheikh, Shehzad, Goy, Michael F., Henning, Susan.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Roche, K. (2016). Intrinsic regulation of quiescence and radioresistance in intestinal stem cells. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:91534062-64fa-4881-9c13-92b57864f0e7

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Roche, Kyle. “Intrinsic regulation of quiescence and radioresistance in intestinal stem cells.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 23, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:91534062-64fa-4881-9c13-92b57864f0e7.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Roche, Kyle. “Intrinsic regulation of quiescence and radioresistance in intestinal stem cells.” 2016. Web. 23 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Roche K. Intrinsic regulation of quiescence and radioresistance in intestinal stem cells. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 23]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:91534062-64fa-4881-9c13-92b57864f0e7.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Roche K. Intrinsic regulation of quiescence and radioresistance in intestinal stem cells. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:91534062-64fa-4881-9c13-92b57864f0e7

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.