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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Gupton, Stephanie"). Showing records 1 – 6 of 6 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Trogden, Kathryn. TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics.

Degree: Biology, 2015, University of North Carolina

 Within a cell, the ends of individual microtubules switch between three different phases: growth, shrinkage and pause without affecting the total mass of microtubule polymer.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cytology; College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Trogden, K. (2015). TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e7f154cb-e2de-418b-a81d-6446323d1fcb

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Trogden, Kathryn. “TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 19, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e7f154cb-e2de-418b-a81d-6446323d1fcb.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Trogden, Kathryn. “TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics.” 2015. Web. 19 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Trogden K. TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 19]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e7f154cb-e2de-418b-a81d-6446323d1fcb.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Trogden K. TOG Proteins are spatially regulated by Rac-GSK3β to control interphase microtubule dynamics. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e7f154cb-e2de-418b-a81d-6446323d1fcb

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Haynes, Elizabeth. GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2015, University of North Carolina

 The lamellipodium is an important structure for cell migration containing branched actin nucleated via the Arp2/3 complex. The formation of branched actin is relatively well… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cytology; School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haynes, E. (2015). GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e5600e13-7990-465c-b3d2-981e18a7c4e0

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haynes, Elizabeth. “GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 19, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e5600e13-7990-465c-b3d2-981e18a7c4e0.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haynes, Elizabeth. “GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts.” 2015. Web. 19 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Haynes E. GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 19]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e5600e13-7990-465c-b3d2-981e18a7c4e0.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Haynes E. GMFβ Controls Branched Actin Content and Lamellipodial Retraction in Fibroblasts. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e5600e13-7990-465c-b3d2-981e18a7c4e0

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

3. Watson, Kelly. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN LGL/TOMOSYN HOMOLOG, SRO7, AND THE RAB GTPASE SEC4 IN POLARIZED EXOCYTOSIS.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2015, University of North Carolina

 Polarized exocytosis requires the proper localized delivery, docking and fusion of secretory vesicles with sites of active growth on the plasma membrane. Members of the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cytology; Molecular biology; Genetics; School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Watson, K. (2015). MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN LGL/TOMOSYN HOMOLOG, SRO7, AND THE RAB GTPASE SEC4 IN POLARIZED EXOCYTOSIS. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:51c241d9-e4a4-400c-993a-29940ae1d79a

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Watson, Kelly. “MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN LGL/TOMOSYN HOMOLOG, SRO7, AND THE RAB GTPASE SEC4 IN POLARIZED EXOCYTOSIS.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 19, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:51c241d9-e4a4-400c-993a-29940ae1d79a.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Watson, Kelly. “MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN LGL/TOMOSYN HOMOLOG, SRO7, AND THE RAB GTPASE SEC4 IN POLARIZED EXOCYTOSIS.” 2015. Web. 19 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Watson K. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN LGL/TOMOSYN HOMOLOG, SRO7, AND THE RAB GTPASE SEC4 IN POLARIZED EXOCYTOSIS. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 19]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:51c241d9-e4a4-400c-993a-29940ae1d79a.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Watson K. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN LGL/TOMOSYN HOMOLOG, SRO7, AND THE RAB GTPASE SEC4 IN POLARIZED EXOCYTOSIS. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:51c241d9-e4a4-400c-993a-29940ae1d79a

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

4. Kutys, Matthew. A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2014, University of North Carolina

 Differential activation of the Rho family GTPases, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA, helps to govern the distinct morphological and migratory phenotypes downstream of adhesion to different… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cytology; Biochemistry; School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kutys, M. (2014). A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:bf6d58e1-869c-49e5-baff-5df0a348eaec

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kutys, Matthew. “A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 19, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:bf6d58e1-869c-49e5-baff-5df0a348eaec.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kutys, Matthew. “A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration.” 2014. Web. 19 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Kutys M. A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 19]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:bf6d58e1-869c-49e5-baff-5df0a348eaec.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kutys M. A Novel, Matrix-Specific GEF/GAP Interaction Regulates Rho GTPase Crosstalk Critical for 3D Collagen Migration. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:bf6d58e1-869c-49e5-baff-5df0a348eaec

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

5. Winkle, Cortney. STAYING TRIM: HOW TRIM9 CONSTRAINS NEURONAL CELL MORPHOLOGY TO REGULATE CONNECTIVITY.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina

 The connectivity of the nervous system is established during development as axons branch and project to synaptic targets. The extracellular axon guidance cue Netrin-1 and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; UNC Neuroscience Center; Neuroscience Curriculum

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Winkle, C. (2016). STAYING TRIM: HOW TRIM9 CONSTRAINS NEURONAL CELL MORPHOLOGY TO REGULATE CONNECTIVITY. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:14b7ba01-bca3-486e-833a-9b4ba0ef004b

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Winkle, Cortney. “STAYING TRIM: HOW TRIM9 CONSTRAINS NEURONAL CELL MORPHOLOGY TO REGULATE CONNECTIVITY.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 19, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:14b7ba01-bca3-486e-833a-9b4ba0ef004b.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Winkle, Cortney. “STAYING TRIM: HOW TRIM9 CONSTRAINS NEURONAL CELL MORPHOLOGY TO REGULATE CONNECTIVITY.” 2016. Web. 19 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Winkle C. STAYING TRIM: HOW TRIM9 CONSTRAINS NEURONAL CELL MORPHOLOGY TO REGULATE CONNECTIVITY. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 19]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:14b7ba01-bca3-486e-833a-9b4ba0ef004b.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Winkle C. STAYING TRIM: HOW TRIM9 CONSTRAINS NEURONAL CELL MORPHOLOGY TO REGULATE CONNECTIVITY. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:14b7ba01-bca3-486e-833a-9b4ba0ef004b

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

6. Cupp, Timothy. In Vivo Examination of the Molecular Mechanics Underlying Apical Constriction's Initiation in C. elegans Gastrulation.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2016, University of North Carolina

 One remarkable finding from research in developmental biology is that surprisingly few cellular behaviors are responsible for the wide variety of morphogenetic events common among… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cupp, T. (2016). In Vivo Examination of the Molecular Mechanics Underlying Apical Constriction's Initiation in C. elegans Gastrulation. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6922a566-d772-4c1d-b88e-fc149f19a83e

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cupp, Timothy. “In Vivo Examination of the Molecular Mechanics Underlying Apical Constriction's Initiation in C. elegans Gastrulation.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed October 19, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6922a566-d772-4c1d-b88e-fc149f19a83e.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cupp, Timothy. “In Vivo Examination of the Molecular Mechanics Underlying Apical Constriction's Initiation in C. elegans Gastrulation.” 2016. Web. 19 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Cupp T. In Vivo Examination of the Molecular Mechanics Underlying Apical Constriction's Initiation in C. elegans Gastrulation. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 19]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6922a566-d772-4c1d-b88e-fc149f19a83e.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cupp T. In Vivo Examination of the Molecular Mechanics Underlying Apical Constriction's Initiation in C. elegans Gastrulation. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:6922a566-d772-4c1d-b88e-fc149f19a83e

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.