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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Garland, Eric"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Li, Wen. Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina

An emerging literature suggests that video game addiction is increasingly prevalent among emerging adults; however, no evidence-based treatments for video game addiction have been identified. Mindfulness treatment shows positive effects for substance use and gambling disorders, and may be a promising intervention for video game addiction. However, mindfulness treatment has not, heretofore, been adapted and evaluated for video game addiction. To fill this gap, my three-paper dissertation involved adapting and pilot testing Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE) treatment for emerging adults with video game addiction using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design. The first paper includes a systematic review of 49 peer-reviewed journal articles evaluating mindfulness treatment for substance misuse. Meta-analytic results revealed significant small-to-large effects of mindfulness treatment in reducing levels of substance misuse, intensity of craving for psychoactive substances, and stress levels. Further, mindfulness treatments were effective in increasing abstinence from cigarette smoking and enhancing levels of mindfulness at posttreatment compared to alternative treatments. The second and third papers describe the development and evaluation of the adapted MORE treatment for video game addiction. The second paper presents a theoretical justification for mindfulness treatment of video game addiction and a study protocol for the RCT evaluating the adapted MORE treatment in emerging adults. The third paper reports the results of the RCT evaluating effects of MORE for emerging adults with video game addiction. Thirty adults (Mage = 25.0, SD = 5.4) with video game addiction were randomized to 8 weeks of group-based MORE or 8 weeks of a support group [SG]. Outcomes included signs and symptoms of video game addiction, craving for video game playing, video gaming-related maladaptive cognitions, perceived stress, coping, and mindfulness, and were measured at pre-and posttreatment using standardized self-report instruments. Analysis of covariance revealed that participation in MORE was associated with significantly greater reductions in signs and symptoms of video game addiction, intensity of craving for video game playing, and negative feelings related to video game playing, and a significantly greater increase in positive coping at posttreatment compared to the SG. Findings suggest that MORE is a promising intervention for emerging adults with video game addiction. Advisors/Committee Members: Li, Wen, Howard, Matthew O., Chapman, Mimi, Garland, Eric, Macy, Rebecca, Weems, Martha.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Social Work

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Li, W. (2016). Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:16d364f2-f9d2-4ce4-a941-90cb94890fe6

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Li, Wen. “Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:16d364f2-f9d2-4ce4-a941-90cb94890fe6.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Li, Wen. “Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults.” 2016. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Li W. Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:16d364f2-f9d2-4ce4-a941-90cb94890fe6.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Li W. Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Video Game Addiction in U.S. Emerging Adults. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:16d364f2-f9d2-4ce4-a941-90cb94890fe6

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Garland, Eric Lee. Biopsychosocial Assessment of a Mindfulness-Oriented Cognitive Intervention for Alcohol Dependent Adults.

Degree: 2009, University of North Carolina

A biopsychosocial approach is needed to comprehend the complex pathogenic processes implicated in alcohol dependence. The following three papers employ such an approach to explore key research questions: (a) How might stress precipitate alcohol misuse, dependence, and relapse, and (b) How can targeted psychosocial interventions influence this process? The first paper presents a novel conceptual framework integrating formerly discrete theories of stress appraisal, neurobiological allostasis, automatic cognitive processing, and addictive behavior to explain how alcohol misuse and dependence is maintained and re-activated by stress. This theoretical framework underpins the measurement model and intervention that are the focus of the second and third papers. The second paper explores relationships between baseline dispositional mindfulness and alcohol attentional bias among a sample of recovering alcohol dependent adults, relationships that are critical to our argument in support of mindfulness training as a treatment for alcohol dependence. The third paper in this series is a report of a randomized controlled pilot trial comparing the effects of a mindfulness-oriented intervention to those of an alcohol dependence support group. Results from this study provide tentative support for the proposed theoretical framework and for the use of mindfulness as a treatment for alcohol dependence. Advisors/Committee Members: Garland, Eric Lee, Howard, Matthew O..

Subjects/Keywords: School of Social Work

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Garland, E. L. (2009). Biopsychosocial Assessment of a Mindfulness-Oriented Cognitive Intervention for Alcohol Dependent Adults. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:5035f74a-2b11-426e-89e8-2337bcc02280

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garland, Eric Lee. “Biopsychosocial Assessment of a Mindfulness-Oriented Cognitive Intervention for Alcohol Dependent Adults.” 2009. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:5035f74a-2b11-426e-89e8-2337bcc02280.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garland, Eric Lee. “Biopsychosocial Assessment of a Mindfulness-Oriented Cognitive Intervention for Alcohol Dependent Adults.” 2009. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Garland EL. Biopsychosocial Assessment of a Mindfulness-Oriented Cognitive Intervention for Alcohol Dependent Adults. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:5035f74a-2b11-426e-89e8-2337bcc02280.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Garland EL. Biopsychosocial Assessment of a Mindfulness-Oriented Cognitive Intervention for Alcohol Dependent Adults. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2009. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:5035f74a-2b11-426e-89e8-2337bcc02280

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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