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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Feng, Yan"). One record found.

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University of North Carolina

1. Feng, Yan. MODLE REDUCTION IN BIOMECHANICS.

Degree: Mathematics, 2017, University of North Carolina

The mechanical characteristic of the cell is primarily performed by the cytoskeleton. Microtubules, actin, and intermediate filaments are the three main cytoskeletal polymers. Of these, microtubules are the stiffest and have multiple functions within a cell that include: providing tracks for intracellular transport, transmitting the mechanical force necessary for cell division during mitosis, and providing sufficient stiffness for propulsion in flagella and cilia. Microtubule mechanics has been studied by a variety of methods: detailed molecular dynamics (MD), coarse-grained models, engineering type models, and elastic continuum models. In principle, atomistic MD simulations should be able to predict all desired mechanical properties of a single molecule, however, in practice the large computational resources are required to carry out a simulation of larger biomolecular system. Due to the limited accessibility using even the most ambitious all-atom models and the demand for the multiscale molecular modeling and simulation, the emergence of the reduced models is critically important to provide the capability for investigating the biomolecular dynamics that are critical to many biological processes. Then the coarse-grained models, such as elastic network models and anisotropic network models, have been shown to bequite accurate in predicting microtubule mechanical response, but still requires significant computational resources. On the other hand, the microtubule is treated as comprising materials with certain continuum material properties. Such continuum models, especially Euler-Bernoulli beam models, are often used to extract mechanical parameters from experimental results. The microtubule is treated as comprising materials with certain continuum material properties. Such continuum models, especially Euler-Bernoulli beam models in which the biomolecular system is assumed as homogeneous isotropic materials with solid cross-sections, are often used to extract mechanical parameters from experimental results. However, in real biological world, these homogeneous and isotropic assumptions are usually invalidate. Thus, instead of using hypothesized model, a specific continuum model at mesoscopic scale can be introduced based upon data reduction of the results from molecular simulations at atomistic level. Once a continuum model is established, it can provide details on the distribution of stresses and strains induced within the biomolecular system which is useful in determining the distribution and transmission of these forces to the cytoskeletal and sub-cellular components, and help us gain a better understanding in cell mechanics. A data-driven model reduction approach to the problem of microtubule mechanics as an application is present, a beam element is constructed for microtubules based upon data reduction of the results from molecular simulation of the carbon backbone chain of αβ-tubulin dimers. The data base of mechanical responses to various types of loads from molecular simulation is reduced to dominant modes. The… Advisors/Committee Members: Feng, Yan, Mitran, Sorin, Superfine, Richard, Falvo, Michael, Rodriguez, Nancy, Newhall, Katherine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Subjects/Keywords: College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Mathematics

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APA (6th Edition):

Feng, Y. (2017). MODLE REDUCTION IN BIOMECHANICS. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c774cbe6-16bb-49b8-bde9-d557b97cd8bb

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Feng, Yan. “MODLE REDUCTION IN BIOMECHANICS.” 2017. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 23, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c774cbe6-16bb-49b8-bde9-d557b97cd8bb.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Feng, Yan. “MODLE REDUCTION IN BIOMECHANICS.” 2017. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Feng Y. MODLE REDUCTION IN BIOMECHANICS. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c774cbe6-16bb-49b8-bde9-d557b97cd8bb.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Feng Y. MODLE REDUCTION IN BIOMECHANICS. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c774cbe6-16bb-49b8-bde9-d557b97cd8bb

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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