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University of North Carolina

1. Farrell, Martilias Stephen. Pharmacosynthetics and the Cell-Type-Specific Control of Neuronal Signaling.

Degree: Pharmacology, 2013, University of North Carolina

Pharmacology, in its broadest interpretation, is defined as the study of drug action. In modern neuropsychopharmacology, there is a conceptual boundary between the drug and the action, with the drug itself on one side and signal transducer (receptor), the signal transduction cascade (effector proteins, second messengers), the cellular response (transcriptional regulation, activity modulation), the organ response (brain circuitry modulation), and, finally, the whole organism response (behavior) on the other. In other words, pharmacology has structured itself around the idea that the exogenous molecule (the drug) encodes a signal leading to everything on the other side including, in extreme instances, a physiological response. The inference is that engaging a particular signal transduction pathway in a defined cell type leads inexorably to a prototypic physiological response. Here, I suggest that the invention of synthetic ligand – GPCR pairs (aka DREADDs, RASSLS, 'pharmacogenetics') permits the study of pharmacology using a shifted equation: with the signal transduction elements moved to the left and, subsequently, under experimental control. For the purposes of disambiguation and to clarify this approach as a creation of pharmacological manipulation, I present the term pharmacosynthetics to describe what has heretofore been called pharmacogenetics or chemicogenetics. In this document I will review previous work utilizing this technology, present my work validating a variation of this technology in a heretofore untested cellular context, and provide a perspective on how this technology can advance the field of pharmacology. Advisors/Committee Members: Farrell, Martilias Stephen, Roth, Bryan.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Pharmacology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Farrell, M. S. (2013). Pharmacosynthetics and the Cell-Type-Specific Control of Neuronal Signaling. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:50945299-9c54-4b55-922e-ac3f0addb938

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Farrell, Martilias Stephen. “Pharmacosynthetics and the Cell-Type-Specific Control of Neuronal Signaling.” 2013. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed November 29, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:50945299-9c54-4b55-922e-ac3f0addb938.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Farrell, Martilias Stephen. “Pharmacosynthetics and the Cell-Type-Specific Control of Neuronal Signaling.” 2013. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Farrell MS. Pharmacosynthetics and the Cell-Type-Specific Control of Neuronal Signaling. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:50945299-9c54-4b55-922e-ac3f0addb938.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Farrell MS. Pharmacosynthetics and the Cell-Type-Specific Control of Neuronal Signaling. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:50945299-9c54-4b55-922e-ac3f0addb938

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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