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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Davis, C."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Haddock, Brookelyn J. The role of MARCKS in mast cell regulated exocytosis.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2010, University of North Carolina

MARCKS is implicated as a critical regulator of regulated exocytosis. We studied the role of MARCKS in mast cell regulated exocytosis by comparing the secretion of embryonic hepatic-derived WT and MARCKS-deficient mast cells. Mast cells in suspension showed no secretory differences, however, adherent MARCKS-deficient cells demonstrated enhanced secretion and accelerated release of secretory cargo compared to WT. Surprisingly, application of purported MARCKS inhibitory peptides showed no MARCKS-specific inhibition. Thus, while MARCKS is not essential for mast cell regulated exocytosis, it does negatively modulate secretion. In a separate study, conserved regions of MARCKS were tested for their necessity in the subcellular targeting of MARCKS from the PM to the cytosol, believed to be crucial for its multiple functions. We confirmed this movement using live cell imaging of HEK293 cells transfected with full-length MARCKS constructs. Notably, phosphorylated MARCKS associated with cytosolic membranes, and only myristoylation and PKC phosphorylation affected the translocation process. Advisors/Committee Members: Haddock, Brookelyn J., Davis, C., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haddock, B. J. (2010). The role of MARCKS in mast cell regulated exocytosis. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2c1b4bbe-9b9a-429b-9a34-b74807cec8a3

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haddock, Brookelyn J. “The role of MARCKS in mast cell regulated exocytosis.” 2010. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed September 27, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2c1b4bbe-9b9a-429b-9a34-b74807cec8a3.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haddock, Brookelyn J. “The role of MARCKS in mast cell regulated exocytosis.” 2010. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Haddock BJ. The role of MARCKS in mast cell regulated exocytosis. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2010. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2c1b4bbe-9b9a-429b-9a34-b74807cec8a3.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Haddock BJ. The role of MARCKS in mast cell regulated exocytosis. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2010. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:2c1b4bbe-9b9a-429b-9a34-b74807cec8a3

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Shenoy, Siddharth. Engineering Systems to Study the Mechanics of Cilia- and Airflow-mediated Mucus Clearance.

Degree: Biomedical Engineering, 2015, University of North Carolina

The pulmonary airway surface liquid layer is comprised of two components: 1) inhaled pathogens that are stuck to a mucus layer and 2) a periciliary layer (PCL) that provides an environment for mucociliary clearance (MCC) out of the lungs. The mechanisms of how the beating of cilia from adjacent ciliated cells is coordinated are poorly understood. In Chapter 2, the perfusion of fluid flow along the apical surface of airway cells was hypothesized to yield airway cultures that transported mucus uni-directionally. To test this hypothesis, perfusion protocols were performed during ciliogenesis and post-ciliation phase of in vitro human bronchial epithelial (HBE) airway models. The length of exposure of fluid shear stress on the apical surface of airway epithelial cultures yielded transient or permanent unidirectional mucus transport in the direction of fluid flow cue. These characteristics matched in vivo biology and remained unseen in standard tissue culturing protocols. In addition to MCC, two other modes of mucus clearance have been studied namely cough clearance (CC) and proposed here, a third mechanism: cilia-independent "gas-liquid transport" (GLT). In Chapter 3, a system was engineered to deliver laminar, humidified airflow across the surface of HBE cultures, which emulated peak expiratory flow rates associated with exhalation. In the GLT models, three conditions of mucosal hydration were tested to represent a variety of clearance models between health and disease: from well-hydrated, normal-like mucus, in situ mucus, to dehydrated mucus, which represented severe Cystic Fibrosis (CF) mucus. At healthy mucus concentrations (2-4%), GLT rate was much faster at clearing mucus than MCC. In contrast, under conditions of severe dehydration, CF-like, GLT failed to produce significant mucus transport, as observed with MCC. In Chapter 4, the effect of mucus clearance with air velocities associated with cough was investigated and captured using high-speed photography. CC was also observed to decrease as mucus concentration increased. Together, the methods developed in this dissertation will help researchers to culture HBE cells with transport characteristics similar to in vivo behavior and help clinicians to better evaluate drug therapeutics on airway clearance for treating muco-obstructive diseases like CF. Advisors/Committee Members: Shenoy, Siddharth, Button, Brian, Dennis, Robert G., Donnelly, Kenneth, Carlson, John, Davis, C., MacDonald, Jeffrey.

Subjects/Keywords: Biomedical engineering; Physiology; Biophysics; School of Medicine; UNC/NCSU Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shenoy, S. (2015). Engineering Systems to Study the Mechanics of Cilia- and Airflow-mediated Mucus Clearance. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f88c8f28-d63a-4a57-b222-f7554a6da53b

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shenoy, Siddharth. “Engineering Systems to Study the Mechanics of Cilia- and Airflow-mediated Mucus Clearance.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed September 27, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f88c8f28-d63a-4a57-b222-f7554a6da53b.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shenoy, Siddharth. “Engineering Systems to Study the Mechanics of Cilia- and Airflow-mediated Mucus Clearance.” 2015. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Shenoy S. Engineering Systems to Study the Mechanics of Cilia- and Airflow-mediated Mucus Clearance. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f88c8f28-d63a-4a57-b222-f7554a6da53b.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Shenoy S. Engineering Systems to Study the Mechanics of Cilia- and Airflow-mediated Mucus Clearance. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:f88c8f28-d63a-4a57-b222-f7554a6da53b

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

3. Jacobs, Damon. Myosin 5c is a class V myosin that functions in secretory granule trafficking.

Degree: Cell Biology and Physiology, 2008, University of North Carolina

Myosin motor proteins are a super family of mechanoenzymes that carry out diverse functions in plants and animals. Class V myosins power the movement of membranous organelles along tracks composed of actin filaments. Myosin Vc (Myo5c) is the third and final member of the myosin V family to be discovered. The mRNA distribution of Myo5c indicated that it is preferentially expressed in epithelial cells and glandular tissues. Initial studies in HeLa cells indicated that Myo5c was associated with an endocytic recycling compartment. Kinetic studies showed that Myo5c is a non-processive vertebrate class V myosin. These studies revealed that, unlike Myo5a and Myo5b, Myo5c is a low duty ratio motor and the rate limiting step of the ATPase cycle is in a prehydrolysis state. More recently, we began to explore the functions of Myo5c in exocrine secretion. Tissue surveys and immunoblots of rat tissues showed that Myo5c is expressed most abundantly in acinar cells and localizes to the apical domain. Our studies utilized exocrine-derived MCF-7 cells to reveal the first endogenous localization of Myo5c in human cells. Myo5c clearly labeled distinct membrane compartments consisting of puncta and long, slender tubules. Our generation of a full-length, GFP-tagged Myo5c expression construct showed that in living cells Myo5c-associated puncta and tubules exhibit differing localization, dynamics, and dependence upon the cytoskeleton. Our key results in MCF-7 cells demonstrated that Myo5c is tightly associated with secretory granules and that expression of a dominant-negative Myo5c tail disrupts the distribution of secretory granules. Furthermore, in acinar cells of the lacrimal gland, Myo5c tail partially inhibited carbachol stimulated secretion. Together these results strongly indicate that Myo5c is a unique vertebrate class V myosin with important functions in exocrine secretion. Advisors/Committee Members: Jacobs, Damon, Cheney, Richard, Otey, Carol, Davis, C., Erickson, Ann, Anderson, James M..

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jacobs, D. (2008). Myosin 5c is a class V myosin that functions in secretory granule trafficking. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3539c3d8-3029-4bbc-a9f3-fe836240ee48

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jacobs, Damon. “Myosin 5c is a class V myosin that functions in secretory granule trafficking.” 2008. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed September 27, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3539c3d8-3029-4bbc-a9f3-fe836240ee48.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jacobs, Damon. “Myosin 5c is a class V myosin that functions in secretory granule trafficking.” 2008. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Jacobs D. Myosin 5c is a class V myosin that functions in secretory granule trafficking. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2008. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3539c3d8-3029-4bbc-a9f3-fe836240ee48.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jacobs D. Myosin 5c is a class V myosin that functions in secretory granule trafficking. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2008. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3539c3d8-3029-4bbc-a9f3-fe836240ee48

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.