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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Danforth, Benjamin"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Danforth, Benjamin. The Development of Education Systems in Advanced Capitalist Societies.

Degree: Political Science, 2014, University of North Carolina

Although mass education has become a common feature of all advanced capitalist societies, it has not developed uniformly across these societies. Significant divergences have arisen in the types of education that these societies emphasize and in the levels of effort that they devote to promoting and improving education for all. To understand these divergences and their causes better, this dissertation comparatively analyzes two important phases in the development of mass education in more affluent societies: the pre-World War II expansion in secondary education and the postwar growth in tertiary education. For both of these phases, the dissertation argues that notable institutional differences in these societies' education systems arose from political struggles that were largely driven by distributional concerns. Although mass education has become a common feature of all advanced capitalist societies, it has not developed uniformly across these societies. Significant divergences have arisen in the types of education that these societies emphasize and in the levels of effort that they devote to promoting and improving education for all. To understand these divergences and their causes better, this dissertation comparatively analyzes two important phases in the development of mass education in more affluent societies: the pre-World War II expansion in secondary education and the postwar growth in tertiary education. For both of these phases, the dissertation argues that notable institutional differences in these societies' education systems arose from political struggles that were largely driven by distributional concerns. To evaluate this general argument and its more specific parts, this dissertation employs a mixed-method approach combining broad statistical analysis with focused case-study analysis. For the statistical component of this approach, two new sets of cross-national data on political economy and education systems covering 17 advanced capitalist societies for the years from 1880 to 1985 are examined. In the case-study component, historical analyses of educational development in Germany, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries are carried out. The combined results of these analyses show that prewar struggles over secondary education were heavily shaped by two factors: the structure of state authority over education and the strength of coordination legacies in training. It is found that variation in these two variables mostly accounts for the emergence of different mixes of general education and vocational training at the secondary level. For the postwar phase of educational development, the results show that partisan government incumbency and constitutional veto points were key determinants of cross-national differences in the generosity, distribution, and coverage of public education systems. Among other things, it is found that right government involvement and pervasive veto points are associated with distributional arrangements in education… Advisors/Committee Members: Danforth, Benjamin, Stephens, John, Brady, David, Hooghe, Liesbet, Huber, Evelyne, Marks, Gary.

Subjects/Keywords: Political science; Education; History; Sociology; College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Political Science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Danforth, B. (2014). The Development of Education Systems in Advanced Capitalist Societies. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:ababcf0c-fa5c-41bc-a642-04311687948b

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Danforth, Benjamin. “The Development of Education Systems in Advanced Capitalist Societies.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 19, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:ababcf0c-fa5c-41bc-a642-04311687948b.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Danforth, Benjamin. “The Development of Education Systems in Advanced Capitalist Societies.” 2014. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Danforth B. The Development of Education Systems in Advanced Capitalist Societies. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:ababcf0c-fa5c-41bc-a642-04311687948b.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Danforth B. The Development of Education Systems in Advanced Capitalist Societies. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:ababcf0c-fa5c-41bc-a642-04311687948b

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Danforth, Benjamin T. The emergence of three worlds of welfare.

Degree: Political Science, 2009, University of North Carolina

Gøsta Esping-Andersen's three worlds typology of welfare state regimes has become the dominant heuristic for classifying and examining contemporary welfare states. Despite its widespread adoption, however, few systematic efforts have been made to determine when these three worlds first emerged or for what range of history the tripartite typology is applicable. After extending and refining Esping-Andersen's conceptual framework for distinguishing welfare state regimes, this study examines cross-sectional data for each five-year interval from 1950 through 1995 for evidence of tripartite clustering. Using two forms of cluster analysis – a model-based approach and an agglomerative hierarchical approach – on each of these cross-sections, this study finds that the three worlds of welfare first began emerging by 1975, became more distinct by 1980, and were stable by 1985. These findings are consistent with prominent explanations of welfare state development that emphasize the role of cumulative partisan political incumbency and path dependence. Advisors/Committee Members: Danforth, Benjamin T., Stephens, John, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Subjects/Keywords: College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Political Science

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Danforth, B. T. (2009). The emergence of three worlds of welfare. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:dd015dfe-89e3-45be-a0c1-31806b174573

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Danforth, Benjamin T. “The emergence of three worlds of welfare.” 2009. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 19, 2020. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:dd015dfe-89e3-45be-a0c1-31806b174573.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Danforth, Benjamin T. “The emergence of three worlds of welfare.” 2009. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Danforth BT. The emergence of three worlds of welfare. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2009. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:dd015dfe-89e3-45be-a0c1-31806b174573.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Danforth BT. The emergence of three worlds of welfare. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2009. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:dd015dfe-89e3-45be-a0c1-31806b174573

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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