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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Cutchin, Malcolm"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Pergolotti, Mackenzi. Older Adults with Cancer: Participation in Activity and the Utilization of Occupational Therapy.

Degree: 2013, University of North Carolina

The number of older adults with cancer will continue to rise as the American population ages. Older adults with cancer report decreased quality of life, and their limitations within instrumental and other activities of daily living persist after cancer treatment. Restricted perceptions of adults' beliefs of what should be or could be activities for participation (i.e., occupational possibilities) may also lead to a decline in this population's quality of life. Access to occupational therapy services to support participation in occupation and improve quality of life is critical to improving the quality of care for older adults. The purposes of this project were: (1) to determine who among this population utilized occupational therapy services and what predicts that use, (2) to develop and validate a new scale designed to assess perceived occupational possibilities, and (3) to examine the relationships among meaningful activity participation and risk factors, including perceived occupational possibilities. I examined older adults (65+) with diagnoses of breast, prostate, lung, and melanoma (skin) cancer between 2004 and 2007 (n = 27,131), using NC Central Cancer Registry data linked to Medicare billing claims and found that adults with stage IV cancers or lung cancer were less likely to use occupational therapy and that previous use of occupational therapy was the strongest predictor of occupational therapy use. The Perceived Occupational Possibilities Scale (POPS) was found to be reliable and valid when tested with a sample of older adults within the Carolina Senior Registry; in addition, the POPS was found to be a significant predictor of meaningful activity participation. The perceived occupational possibilities of older adults were better predictors of participation in meaningful activity than demographics, functional status and emotional support. In combination, the findings of these three studies suggest that, as more adults are diagnosed with and survive cancer, it is imperative they not be assessed solely on functional ability but also on meaningful activity participation and occupational possibilities. In addition, older adults with cancers that are least likely to be seen by occupational therapists should be targeted with appropriate interventions. Advisors/Committee Members: Pergolotti, Mackenzi, Cutchin, Malcolm.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Allied Health Sciences; Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pergolotti, M. (2013). Older Adults with Cancer: Participation in Activity and the Utilization of Occupational Therapy. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:af33c811-c71f-48a9-a8bf-4d3ca4bdf5fc

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pergolotti, Mackenzi. “Older Adults with Cancer: Participation in Activity and the Utilization of Occupational Therapy.” 2013. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:af33c811-c71f-48a9-a8bf-4d3ca4bdf5fc.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pergolotti, Mackenzi. “Older Adults with Cancer: Participation in Activity and the Utilization of Occupational Therapy.” 2013. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Pergolotti M. Older Adults with Cancer: Participation in Activity and the Utilization of Occupational Therapy. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:af33c811-c71f-48a9-a8bf-4d3ca4bdf5fc.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pergolotti M. Older Adults with Cancer: Participation in Activity and the Utilization of Occupational Therapy. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:af33c811-c71f-48a9-a8bf-4d3ca4bdf5fc

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Heatwole Shank, Kendra Sue. Community Livability for Older Adults: The Person-Place Relationship and Process.

Degree: 2013, University of North Carolina

The concept of Community Livability is widely used, but it is not well studied or understood. It is important to gain a better understanding of the processes and dynamics that contribute to livability, particularly for the rising number of older adults in the United States who will `age in place' in their homes and communities. This dissertation describes a grounded theory study of community livability and the daily activities, or occupations, of older adults who are aging in place. The purpose of the project was to theorize the key dynamics of livability for this population and to identify dimensions of the person-place relationship that should be the focus of future inquiry. A multiple-case study design was used, and twelve older adults (70+) were purposively selected for diversity of experience, socioeconomic level, and living situation. Data collection included sequential interviews; naturalistic observation with each participant during an activity of their choosing; and GPS data collection which yielded spatial data about location, routine, routes, and duration. The spatial and qualitative data were integrated during analysis, where time-space patterns served to contextualize interview and observation data, and qualitative data explained and expanded insights from spatial data. Findings from this study include a rich description of daily life for individuals aging in place in Durham, NC; patterns of participation in daily life that vary by personal and residential factors; and dimensions of place that influence how older adults navigate the social and physical dynamics of their community. A theoretical model of negotiated livability is proposed and explained. Central to the model are three core processes including enacting an ideology of aging, building social infrastructure, and planning and strategic problem-solving. These processes are negotiated through participation, and they shape and are shaped by life course and place processes. These findings and the model are discussed relative to existing frameworks of livability, and are used to examine some current assumptions in the literature about participation in occupation and the experience of aging in place in the community. Advisors/Committee Members: Heatwole Shank, Kendra Sue, Cutchin, Malcolm, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Medicine; Department of Allied Health Sciences; Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Heatwole Shank, K. S. (2013). Community Livability for Older Adults: The Person-Place Relationship and Process. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:99e34413-c08f-4a7c-b9b1-311653545ea0

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Heatwole Shank, Kendra Sue. “Community Livability for Older Adults: The Person-Place Relationship and Process.” 2013. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:99e34413-c08f-4a7c-b9b1-311653545ea0.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Heatwole Shank, Kendra Sue. “Community Livability for Older Adults: The Person-Place Relationship and Process.” 2013. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Heatwole Shank KS. Community Livability for Older Adults: The Person-Place Relationship and Process. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:99e34413-c08f-4a7c-b9b1-311653545ea0.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Heatwole Shank KS. Community Livability for Older Adults: The Person-Place Relationship and Process. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2013. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:99e34413-c08f-4a7c-b9b1-311653545ea0

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

3. Walsh, Tasanee. The Conceptualization of Depression and Acculturative Stress among Latino Immigrants: A Comparison of Scores from Non-Hispanic Whites and Persons of Mexican Origin on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale - Revised (CESD-R).

Degree: 2014, University of North Carolina

This dissertation examines and compares the influence of acculturative stress on the experience of depressive symptoms among Non-Hispanic Whites and persons of Mexican origin. The objectives of this dissertation are threefold: First, to develop an expanded and integrated explanatory model of Latino acculturative stress that accounts for culture, stress and coping, cognitive appraisal, timing, and family and neighborhood factors; second, to evaluate the reliability and validity evidence of the English language version of the CESD-R; and third, to evaluate the reliability and validity evidence of the Spanish language version of the CESD-R. The first manuscript posits an explanatory model that expands upon and integrates work by Berry (2006) and most notably adds the dimension of family and neighborhood. Recent research findings on Latino immigrant depression point toward the importance of understanding and leveraging the protective nature of neighborhood and family (Breslau, 2011; Shell, Peek, & Eschbach, 2013). The second manuscript evaluates the validity and reliability evidence of the English language version of the CESD-R. The results of an EFA, CFAs, and a multiple-group CFA of the English version of the CESD-R suggest that a 15-item version of the CESD-R best fit the study data. The final two-factor solution of negative mood and functional impairment and suicide, fit the data well. The third manuscript evaluates the reliability and validity evidence of the Spanish language version of the CESD-R. The scores of the Spanish Language version of the CESD-R fit the same CESD-R factor structure of Manuscript II. The results support the use of the 15-item version of the CESD-R with a Spanish speaking sample. This suggests that despite cultural differences, there are common cross-cultural components of depression that relate to negative mood and functional impairment and suicide. Advisors/Committee Members: Walsh, Tasanee, Rounds, Kathleen, Bowen, Natasha, Chapman, Mimi, Cutchin, Malcolm, Markides, Kyriakos.

Subjects/Keywords: Quantitative research; Psychometrics; Mental health; Psychology; School of Social Work

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Walsh, T. (2014). The Conceptualization of Depression and Acculturative Stress among Latino Immigrants: A Comparison of Scores from Non-Hispanic Whites and Persons of Mexican Origin on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale - Revised (CESD-R). (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7778e0cc-04a8-478b-9d42-d7914516946c

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Walsh, Tasanee. “The Conceptualization of Depression and Acculturative Stress among Latino Immigrants: A Comparison of Scores from Non-Hispanic Whites and Persons of Mexican Origin on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale - Revised (CESD-R).” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7778e0cc-04a8-478b-9d42-d7914516946c.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Walsh, Tasanee. “The Conceptualization of Depression and Acculturative Stress among Latino Immigrants: A Comparison of Scores from Non-Hispanic Whites and Persons of Mexican Origin on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale - Revised (CESD-R).” 2014. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Walsh T. The Conceptualization of Depression and Acculturative Stress among Latino Immigrants: A Comparison of Scores from Non-Hispanic Whites and Persons of Mexican Origin on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale - Revised (CESD-R). [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7778e0cc-04a8-478b-9d42-d7914516946c.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Walsh T. The Conceptualization of Depression and Acculturative Stress among Latino Immigrants: A Comparison of Scores from Non-Hispanic Whites and Persons of Mexican Origin on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale - Revised (CESD-R). [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:7778e0cc-04a8-478b-9d42-d7914516946c

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.