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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Currin, Carolyn"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Theuerkauf, Ethan. Field and modeling investigations into the drivers and implications of beach and saltmarsh shoreline erosion: Examining the impacts of geomorphic change on coastal carbon budgets and the role of sea-level anomalies in facilitating beach erosion.

Degree: Marine Sciences, 2016, University of North Carolina

Coastal landscapes, such as saltmarshes and barrier islands, evolve across timescales ranging from storm events to millennia in response to a number of physical and anthropogenic drivers. Proper management of these dynamic environments hinges upon a strong scientific understanding of the processes that shape the coast as well as the implications of coastal change. The first chapter of this dissertation presents measurements of beach erosion along a transgressive barrier island related to sea-level anomalies, which are short-term, non-storm fluctuations in water level. These phenomena are recognized along entire continental margins, but are not included in coastal management plans. Erosion measurements from a barrier island in North Carolina indicated that similar amounts of erosion were observed in a year with frequent sea-level anomalies as a year with a hurricane impact. This work suggests that anomalies can exacerbate the impacts of storms, long-term sea-level rise, and human impacts. The second chapter describes a carbon budget model that was developed for mainland fringing saltmarshes that includes shoreline erosion, which is a process largely ignored in marsh carbon assessments. The final chapter extends the marsh carbon budget to transgressive barrier islands and explores the impact of erosion, overwash, and geologic setting on barrier island carbon budgets and reservoirs. Saltmarshes are considered carbon sinks because of high carbon burial rates and a carbon reservoir that is presumed to increase through time; however, the global prevalence of marsh loss suggests that marsh carbon budgets must also include carbon export from erosion. Carbon budget box models for mainland fringing saltmarshes and transgressive barrier islands were developed that include both carbon storage across the marsh platform and carbon export from shoreline erosion. The fringing marsh model was applied at an eroding fringing marsh and the output indicates that erosion can switch a marsh from functioning as a sink to a source. The barrier island model was applied at two transgressive barriers and results suggest that erosion, overwash, and human impacts contribute to the transition of a barrier to a carbon source, which results in a reduction in the carbon reservoir through time. Advisors/Committee Members: Theuerkauf, Ethan, Rodriguez, Antonio, Currin, Carolyn, Fegley, Stephen, Luettich, Richard A., McKee, Brent.

Subjects/Keywords: College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Marine Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Theuerkauf, E. (2016). Field and modeling investigations into the drivers and implications of beach and saltmarsh shoreline erosion: Examining the impacts of geomorphic change on coastal carbon budgets and the role of sea-level anomalies in facilitating beach erosion. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:4454af09-dad1-4e57-a1d5-f97067b87da6

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Theuerkauf, Ethan. “Field and modeling investigations into the drivers and implications of beach and saltmarsh shoreline erosion: Examining the impacts of geomorphic change on coastal carbon budgets and the role of sea-level anomalies in facilitating beach erosion.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 27, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:4454af09-dad1-4e57-a1d5-f97067b87da6.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Theuerkauf, Ethan. “Field and modeling investigations into the drivers and implications of beach and saltmarsh shoreline erosion: Examining the impacts of geomorphic change on coastal carbon budgets and the role of sea-level anomalies in facilitating beach erosion.” 2016. Web. 27 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Theuerkauf E. Field and modeling investigations into the drivers and implications of beach and saltmarsh shoreline erosion: Examining the impacts of geomorphic change on coastal carbon budgets and the role of sea-level anomalies in facilitating beach erosion. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 27]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:4454af09-dad1-4e57-a1d5-f97067b87da6.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Theuerkauf E. Field and modeling investigations into the drivers and implications of beach and saltmarsh shoreline erosion: Examining the impacts of geomorphic change on coastal carbon budgets and the role of sea-level anomalies in facilitating beach erosion. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:4454af09-dad1-4e57-a1d5-f97067b87da6

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Gittman, Rachel. THE LIVING SHORELINE APPROACH AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO SHORELINE HARDENING: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ECOLOGY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICE DELIVERY OF SALT MARSHES.

Degree: 2014, University of North Carolina

Foundation species, such as marsh plants, mangroves, seagrasses, corals, and oysters, form some of the most valuable and threatened habitats in the world. The loss of these coastal habitat-forming species often results in significant changes in community structure and ecosystem-service delivery. Therefore, understanding how both biotic (e.g., herbivory) and abiotic (e.g., drought) factors can alter foundation species' structure is critical for promoting resilience to anthropogenic stressors. My dissertation focused on how physical and biological processes regulate salt marshes, and how coastal development, specifically shoreline hardening, affects two marsh ecosystem services: erosion protection and habitat provision for marine fauna. Marsh cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora) is a highly productive foundation species that can inhibit coastal erosion. However, anoxic stress can allow marsh periwinkles to overgraze marshes, resulting in marsh die-off. Burrowing crabs can alleviate anoxic stress (via sediment bioturbation) and thus can potentially sustain marsh productivity. From field experiments (Ch.1), I found that crab bioturbation allowed Spartina to compensate for biomass losses from periwinkle grazing. Unfortunately, shoreline hardening (construction of bulkhead or riprap structures) can reduce marsh access for burrowing crabs and thus increase sediment anoxia, preventing marshes from keeping pace with overgrazing. In Ch. 2, I quantified the prevalence of shoreline hardening in the United States and found that 14% of the shoreline is hardened. Housing density is positively correlated with hardening along the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf sheltered coasts. With projected accelerated population growth along U.S. coasts, marshes may be lost to future shoreline hardening. Heightened awareness of adverse effects of shoreline hardening has increased demand for "living shorelines". Living shorelines include marsh plantings with or without offshore sills. My field surveys of different shoreline types show that living shorelines provide superior erosion protection to bulkheads during a Category 1 hurricane (Ch. 3). Further, by sampling marine fauna in hardened and living shoreline habitats, I show that living shorelines provide better habitat for fish and crustaceans than hardened shorelines lacking marsh (Ch. 4). Therefore, although shoreline hardening is still commonly used for erosion protection, marshes may prevent erosion better than bulkheads during storm events, while also serving as valuable habitat. Advisors/Committee Members: Gittman, Rachel, Bruno, John, Peterson, Charles, Currin, Carolyn, Piehler, Michael, Rodriguez, Antonio.

Subjects/Keywords: Ecology; College of Arts and Sciences; Curriculum in Environment and Ecology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gittman, R. (2014). THE LIVING SHORELINE APPROACH AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO SHORELINE HARDENING: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ECOLOGY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICE DELIVERY OF SALT MARSHES. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:dc218110-e968-400b-946a-a81182afb9fa

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gittman, Rachel. “THE LIVING SHORELINE APPROACH AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO SHORELINE HARDENING: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ECOLOGY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICE DELIVERY OF SALT MARSHES.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed January 27, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:dc218110-e968-400b-946a-a81182afb9fa.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gittman, Rachel. “THE LIVING SHORELINE APPROACH AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO SHORELINE HARDENING: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ECOLOGY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICE DELIVERY OF SALT MARSHES.” 2014. Web. 27 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Gittman R. THE LIVING SHORELINE APPROACH AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO SHORELINE HARDENING: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ECOLOGY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICE DELIVERY OF SALT MARSHES. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 27]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:dc218110-e968-400b-946a-a81182afb9fa.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gittman R. THE LIVING SHORELINE APPROACH AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO SHORELINE HARDENING: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ECOLOGY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICE DELIVERY OF SALT MARSHES. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:dc218110-e968-400b-946a-a81182afb9fa

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.