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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Comello, Nori"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Sontag, Jennah. The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication.

Degree: 2017, University of North Carolina

Text and visual frames in health-related messages can influence the emotions and perceptions of viewers based on what is emphasized in these two frames, which can determine whether viewers will avoid or heed the message. Two separate experimental studies investigated the effectiveness of text and visual frames in depression messages. Study 1 tested three specific visual frames: suffering, treatment, and recovery. Study 2 tested the interaction of gain and loss text frames and positive (i.e. recovery) and negative (i.e. suffering) visual frames. In both studies, participants were randomly assigned to message conditions; Study 1’s suffering, treatment, and recovery message conditions, and Study 2’s gain text with positive visual frame, gain text with negative visual frame, loss text with positive visual frame, and loss text with negative visual frame conditions. Participants viewed three messages each, then answered questions pertaining to emotion, stigma, identity, perceived behavioral attainment, aspiration, and other behavior predictors. The recovery/positive visual frames elicited positive emotion and increased viewers’ aspiration to be like the exemplars depicted in the messages significantly (p<.001) more than the treatment and suffering/negative visual frames. Depictions of recovery imply that those who seek help will improve their lifestyle; therefore, viewers who aspire to be like the individuals depicted are more likely to seek help in order to attain the same positive experiences as those depicted. Suffering/negative visual frames elicited significantly greater negative emotion and decreased aspiration (p<.001). A path analysis also revealed that positive emotion mediated the relationship between recovery/positive visual frames and aspiration. There were no significant differences in outcomes for text frames except for emotion; gain text frames elicited significantly greater (p<.001) positive emotion, while loss text frames elicited negative emotion (p<.001). Based on these findings, it is suggested that message designers consider how negatively framed visuals may deter individuals from heeding the message, while using exemplars that inspire viewers through recovery-related depictions may more effectively motivate individuals to seek help when they experience depressive symptoms. Implications beyond the context of depression are discussed, along with study limitations and suggestions for future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Sontag, Jennah, Lazard, Allison, Noar, Seth, Clayton, Russell, Comello, Nori, Chapman, Mimi.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Media and Journalism; Mass Communication Graduate Program

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sontag, J. (2017). The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3dc8f3de-c98f-4199-afc9-b1f68ca07097

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sontag, Jennah. “The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication.” 2017. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed February 28, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3dc8f3de-c98f-4199-afc9-b1f68ca07097.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sontag, Jennah. “The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication.” 2017. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Sontag J. The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3dc8f3de-c98f-4199-afc9-b1f68ca07097.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sontag J. The Effectiveness of Visual and Text Frames in Health Communication. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2017. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:3dc8f3de-c98f-4199-afc9-b1f68ca07097

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Stevens, Elise. Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen.

Degree: 2016, University of North Carolina

Combining the literature on humor, affect, the parasocial contact hypothesis, and stigma, this dissertation examines the relationship between humor and mental illness stigma in entertainment programming. The model predicted that cognitive and affective humor would predict positive affect and approach of the character with a mental illness. Positive affect and approach were hypothesized to predict parasocial interaction. Parasocial interaction was hypothesized to predict less social distance and less stigma. Study 1 examined this relationship using the television program, Enlightened. Two conditions (one with more humor and one with less humor) were presented to participants (N = 106). Results showed that more perceived cognitive (surprise) and affective (dark) humor predicted positive affect. Those who perceived less disparagement humor were more likely to want to approach the character. Approach predicted PSI and PSI predicted less stigma towards those with mental illness and predicted less social distance. As participants perceived more affective humor, they also felt more stigma towards those with mental illnesses. Study 2 (N = 82) replicated much of these results with different stimuli from the program, Girls. Specifically, affective and cognitive humor predicted positive affect (note: cognitive humor approached significance). Disparagement humor predicted approach tendency. Approach tendency predicted PSI and PSI predicted less social distance between the viewer and a person with a specific mental illness. There was a direct relationship between perceiving more affective humor and reporting more stigma towards those with mental illnesses. Implications for entertainment, theory, and health communication are discussed in addition to limitations and directions for future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Stevens, Elise, Dillman Carpentier, Francesca, Gibson, Rhonda, Comello, Nori, Hoffner, Cynthia, Raney, Art.

Subjects/Keywords: School of Media and Journalism; Mass Communication Graduate Program

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stevens, E. (2016). Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e2d16f11-de61-44cc-bc7a-d15cfbd144f5

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stevens, Elise. “Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen.” 2016. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed February 28, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e2d16f11-de61-44cc-bc7a-d15cfbd144f5.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stevens, Elise. “Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen.” 2016. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Stevens E. Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e2d16f11-de61-44cc-bc7a-d15cfbd144f5.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Stevens E. Humor and Stigma: An Examination of Viewer Perceptions of Stigmatized Characters On Screen. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2016. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:e2d16f11-de61-44cc-bc7a-d15cfbd144f5

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

3. Qian, Xiaokun. Comparing the Effectiveness of "Individual-loss" and "Family-loss" Messages in Promoting Mammography.

Degree: 2014, University of North Carolina

The study compared the effectiveness of two loss-framed messages, namely, graphics and text therein with individual-loss or family-loss theme, in increasing women's intention to take and talk about mammogram, and level of negative emotions such as sadness. Moderating effect of number of children living in the family, age of the youngest child, and women's marital status was also assessed. Two hundred females were randomly assigned to view either the individual-loss or family-loss message and completed a questionnaire assessing the aforementioned outcomes. After controlling for confounders, multiple regression revealed no significant difference in intention to take or talk about mammogram between the two groups. However, family-loss message induced significantly more sadness compared to the individual-loss message. Multiple regression with interaction indicated that number of children living in the family is a moderator for group effect on intention to talk about mammogram. These results may guide future design of mammogram promotion materials. Advisors/Committee Members: Qian, Xiaokun, Southwell, Brian, Comello, Nori, Slater, Jonathan.

Subjects/Keywords: Mass media; School of Media and Journalism; Mass Communication Graduate Program

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Qian, X. (2014). Comparing the Effectiveness of "Individual-loss" and "Family-loss" Messages in Promoting Mammography. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d4e619b1-4d69-4cfc-90fb-4543aa562c11

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Qian, Xiaokun. “Comparing the Effectiveness of "Individual-loss" and "Family-loss" Messages in Promoting Mammography.” 2014. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed February 28, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d4e619b1-4d69-4cfc-90fb-4543aa562c11.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Qian, Xiaokun. “Comparing the Effectiveness of "Individual-loss" and "Family-loss" Messages in Promoting Mammography.” 2014. Web. 28 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Qian X. Comparing the Effectiveness of "Individual-loss" and "Family-loss" Messages in Promoting Mammography. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. [cited 2021 Feb 28]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d4e619b1-4d69-4cfc-90fb-4543aa562c11.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Qian X. Comparing the Effectiveness of "Individual-loss" and "Family-loss" Messages in Promoting Mammography. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2014. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:d4e619b1-4d69-4cfc-90fb-4543aa562c11

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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