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You searched for +publisher:"University of North Carolina" +contributor:("Casanova, Lisa"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of North Carolina

1. Soros, Ampai. Chitosan Coagulation for Household Water Treatment in Developing Countries.

Degree: Environmental Sciences and Engineering, 2015, University of North Carolina

Providing safe drinking water for underserved populations is still a challenge. Almost 800 million people around the world consume untreated or improperly treated water. Household water treatment is a critical and immediate intervention to provide safe drinking water where there are no improved sources of drinking water or water treatment systems do not function properly. The purpose of this research was to determine the efficacy of chitosan as a novel coagulant for water treatment in the home and determine whether characteristics of chitosan, especially molecular weight and degree of deacetylation, influence the performance of chitosan for removal of turbidity and microbes (bacteria and viruses) from water. Effects of water quality parameters such as pH, turbidity and salinity on chitosan coagulation efficacy were also evaluated. Zeta potential during coagulation and antimicrobial effects of chitosan in water were examined to give insight into potential mechanisms of chitosan action. The jar test method was used to evaluate the effects of chitosan characteristics on removal of turbidity and representative microbes (E. coli and bacteriophage MS2) from water. Overall, this research suggests that chitosan is an effective natural coagulant to use for household water treatment. Chitosan efficiently removed kaolinite or bentonite turbidity at low optimum chitosan dose of 3 mg/L. It also exhibited 3 -5 log10 removal of E. coli bacteria and bacteriophage MS2 at chitosan doses of 3-10 mg/L. The chief mechanisms of turbidity and microbial removal by chitosan include interparticle bridging and charge neutralization. The antimicrobial activity of chitosan appeared to play a minor role in microbial removal. Raw water qualities such as pH, salinity and turbidity had minimal effects on chitosan’s efficacy. Chitosans with intermediate molecular weight and high degree of deacetylation are the best candidates for turbidity and microbial removal, and there is a range of effective doses; chitosans exhibit high removal of turbidity and microbes, including bacteria and viruses, across a range of raw water qualities. Advisors/Committee Members: Soros, Ampai, Sobsey, Mark, Casanova, Lisa, Ball, Louise, Stewart, Jill, Coronell, Orlando.

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental health; Public health; Gillings School of Global Public Health; Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Soros, A. (2015). Chitosan Coagulation for Household Water Treatment in Developing Countries. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:270d0d48-12ea-4e42-ae83-0bc682f4c890

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Soros, Ampai. “Chitosan Coagulation for Household Water Treatment in Developing Countries.” 2015. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:270d0d48-12ea-4e42-ae83-0bc682f4c890.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Soros, Ampai. “Chitosan Coagulation for Household Water Treatment in Developing Countries.” 2015. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Soros A. Chitosan Coagulation for Household Water Treatment in Developing Countries. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:270d0d48-12ea-4e42-ae83-0bc682f4c890.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Soros A. Chitosan Coagulation for Household Water Treatment in Developing Countries. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2015. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:270d0d48-12ea-4e42-ae83-0bc682f4c890

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Carolina

2. Casanova, Lisa Marie. Survival and transmission of coronaviruses in the healthcare environment.

Degree: Environmental Sciences and Engineering, 2008, University of North Carolina

The need for a comprehensive understanding of the routes by which viruses can spread in healthcare environments and the measures needed to prevent transmission has taken on particular urgency since the advent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). First emerging in 2003, this newly discovered coronavirus infection spread through 26 countries, with over 8000 cases and 700 deaths. One of the striking features of the SARS outbreak was its spread in healthcare facilities, resulting in transmission to patients, visitors, and healthcare workers (HCWs). Evidence suggests that in addition to droplets and aerosols, environmental surfaces, including protective equipment worn by healthcare workers, may serve as vehicles for transmission of SARS-CoV in the healthcare environment. However, there are significant gaps in our knowledge of how coronaviruses survive on inanimate surfaces and objects, including personal protective equipment (PPE) items, found in healthcare environments. To fill these crucial knowledge gaps, this research was undertaken to better understand risks of viral contamination during PPE removal and the effects of temperature and humidity on the survival of coronaviruses on surfaces found in healthcare environments. These studies showed that currently recommended methods for removal of healthcare PPE are insufficient to protect HCWs from viral contamination during PPE removal, and that potential alternative methods for PPE removal should be developed and validated. Viral survival studies using human and animal coronaviruses as potential surrogates for SARS coronavirus show that if deposited in high numbers, coronaviruses dried onto surfaces may survive for days at temperatures and humidity levels found in healthcare environments. These viruses may also survive on materials used to make PPE long enough to pose a transmission risk. These findings suggest other members of the coronavirus family could serve as conservative surrogates for modeling the risk of indirect personal contact and environmental transmission of SARS by healthcare surfaces and PPE items, and can be used in studies to determine ways to interrupt this route of exposure and reduce the risk of disease transmission. Advisors/Committee Members: Casanova, Lisa Marie, Sobsey, Mark, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Subjects/Keywords: Gillings School of Global Public Health; Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Casanova, L. M. (2008). Survival and transmission of coronaviruses in the healthcare environment. (Thesis). University of North Carolina. Retrieved from https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c32634e6-3194-4d21-b278-4e14ea1926c0

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Casanova, Lisa Marie. “Survival and transmission of coronaviruses in the healthcare environment.” 2008. Thesis, University of North Carolina. Accessed March 09, 2021. https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c32634e6-3194-4d21-b278-4e14ea1926c0.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Casanova, Lisa Marie. “Survival and transmission of coronaviruses in the healthcare environment.” 2008. Web. 09 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Casanova LM. Survival and transmission of coronaviruses in the healthcare environment. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2008. [cited 2021 Mar 09]. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c32634e6-3194-4d21-b278-4e14ea1926c0.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Casanova LM. Survival and transmission of coronaviruses in the healthcare environment. [Thesis]. University of North Carolina; 2008. Available from: https://cdr.lib.unc.edu/record/uuid:c32634e6-3194-4d21-b278-4e14ea1926c0

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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