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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Zheng, Yi, School of Humanities & Languages, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Yan, Zhenhui. Geographies of the ethnic minority children in Chinese cinema (1990s and 2000s): rurality, ethnicity and nationalism.

Degree: Humanities, 2018, University of New South Wales

The subject of ethnic minority children and childhoods has attracted Chinese filmmakers over the past three decades, yet relevant research is rare. The thesis draws on theories in cinematic landscape and children’s geographies to explore how ethnic minority childhood experience is constructed cinematically. What in particular is made of rurality versus urban living, how are such geographies imagined, and how do these vistas and landscapes facilitate the understanding of the children’s identities and reflect certain ideological agendas of filmmakers in the context of a Han-dominated multi-ethnic nation during its rapid social-political transformations in the 1990s and 2000s? In individual chapters, various theoretical approaches are also deployed, such as the idea of natural space in a musical, a rural idyllic childhood, focalisation in film narrative, relational construction of space, transitional space of play and media’s impact on identity construction.The thesis concludes that, in different historical periods, the ethnic minority children’s connections with rural space carry different connotations. In the early 1990s, they aspire for the more ‘advanced’ urban space dominated by Han Chinese as a route to better education and upward mobility. In the 2000s, they are returned to rurality, admired for maintaining a harmonious relationship with nature, land and community. The children are also positioned by films in different relationships with ethnic traditions, either forced into creative reimagination of the world by appropriating diverse cultural resources or existing in harmony with their local heritage as imagined by Han nostalgia. In these (Han) narratives, the children adhere to traditional practices and rural spaces, immune to impacts of modernisation. Conversely, in a film directed by a filmmaker of their own ethnicity, the complexity of identity construction in the child protagonist is revealed complete with contradictions and flexibility. Finally, despite convenience, the children are used to embody multi-ethnic unity with surprising nuances. In the 1990s, their aspiration for urban space serves the discourse of development and nationhood. But, in the context of the Beijing 2008 Olympics, their temporary location in the city deconstructs nationalism due to the special circumstances of left-behind children and enforced displacement of ethnic minorities away from their homelands. Advisors/Committee Members: Zheng, Yi, School of Humanities & Languages, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW, Donald, Stephanie Hemelryk, University of Lincoln, UK, Eli, Ayxem, School of Humanities & Languages, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: cinematic landscape; ethnic minority children; Chinese cinema; children's geographies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yan, Z. (2018). Geographies of the ethnic minority children in Chinese cinema (1990s and 2000s): rurality, ethnicity and nationalism. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60032

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yan, Zhenhui. “Geographies of the ethnic minority children in Chinese cinema (1990s and 2000s): rurality, ethnicity and nationalism.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed June 15, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60032.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yan, Zhenhui. “Geographies of the ethnic minority children in Chinese cinema (1990s and 2000s): rurality, ethnicity and nationalism.” 2018. Web. 15 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Yan Z. Geographies of the ethnic minority children in Chinese cinema (1990s and 2000s): rurality, ethnicity and nationalism. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2018. [cited 2019 Jun 15]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60032.

Council of Science Editors:

Yan Z. Geographies of the ethnic minority children in Chinese cinema (1990s and 2000s): rurality, ethnicity and nationalism. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2018. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60032


University of New South Wales

2. Luo, Haizhi. Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912.

Degree: Social Sciences, 2017, University of New South Wales

Fiction, as one of the earliest diasporic Chinese literary genres as well as the most neglected one in current scholarships, is the focus of this research project. The thesis examines Chinese language fiction published in the three earliest Australian Chinese language newspapers from 1894 to 1912, when Australian Chinese diaspora experienced an initial plethora of urban cultural development. Through the thesis, I propose to show the incipient evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction and argue that the beginning of Chinese Australian writing should be redefined to the turn of the 20th century given its original and exemplary contribution to the development of a diasporic literary tradition in Australia. During these years, Australian Chinese language fiction evolved from a production largely derivative of the classical Chinese narrative tradition, to a modern and localised form through the influence and inspiration of the late Qing revolution in fiction. This achievement can be witnessed in the employment of modern narrative techniques and structures, in the incorporation of local lives and events into the stories, and in the hybridity of themes that mix traditional and modern interests such as exile and ethnic unity, which are rare in late Qing Chinese fiction but essential to the concerns of post-colonial and diasporic cultural studies. Demonstrating the value of early Australian Chinese language fiction offers a fresh angle to enrich our knowledge of the life experience of early Chinese migrants. It also reconnects such diasporic narratives with the modernising development of late Qing fiction in China as well as other early Chinese diasporic fiction, thus providing us an opportunity to discuss their mutual interaction and influence, as well as their role in the transnational development of world Chinese language literature. More importantly, it demonstrates how the localising process of the diasporic Chinese literary tradition began in Australia by supplementing the stories and other imaginative accounts of early Chinese migrants into the national literature of Australia, showing an alternative historical image of the Australian Chinese communities and a diversified vision of Australia’s social and cultural experience that was taking place already over a century ago. Advisors/Committee Members: Zheng, Yi, School of Humanities & Languages, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW, Kowallis, Jon, School of Humanities & Languages, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Chinese Australian writing; Australian Chinese Fiction; Diasporic Chinese fiction; Australian Chinese literature; Diasporic Chinese literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Luo, H. (2017). Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912. (Masters Thesis). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57666 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:44488/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Luo, Haizhi. “Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of New South Wales. Accessed June 15, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57666 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:44488/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Luo, Haizhi. “Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912.” 2017. Web. 15 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Luo H. Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2017. [cited 2019 Jun 15]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57666 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:44488/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Luo H. Towards a modern diasporic literary tradition: the evolution of Australian Chinese language fiction from 1894 to 1912. [Masters Thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2017. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57666 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:44488/SOURCE02?view=true

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