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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Tseng, Chung-Li, Information Systems, Technology & Management, Australian School of Business, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Motamarri, Saradhi. Distinguishing mHealth from other health care alternatives in developing countries: a study on service characteristics.

Degree: Information Systems, Technology & Management, 2013, University of New South Wales

Services in general and healthcare services in particular require proper planning and design so as to address patients’ concerns and improve outcomes. In this context, mobile phone’s wide spread penetration coupled with its versatility is transforming it as a significant delivery channel for healthcare services. Mobile Health (mHealth- healthcare using mobile phones) is expected to enhance the access to healthcare especially, in the developing world. Following the House of Quality (HoQ) for service design, the literature search identified significant gaps in comparatively assessing mHealth with the other conventional services. Such an analysis is important for the large scale adoption of mHealth. To fill this gap, the current research has carried out a quantitative comparison of healthcare services, an important element of HoQ. The study explores the broad research questions: whether service alternatives are distinguishable from each other and if so, what factors contribute to the differentiation. A multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) is performed to understand patients’ perceptions of various healthcare services: public hospital (PH), general practitioner (GP), traditional medicine (TM) and B2C mHealth service in a developing country. Ubiquity, interaction quality and value have been identified to have significant influence on the patients’ attitude towards health care services. mHealth is perceived by the patients as far more easy to use, useful and valuable than other service alternatives. These insights are incorporated into the HoQ model for healthcare service design. mHealth is found to be an effective alternative to serve the developing world where populations are marginally deprived of even basic healthcare services. Theoretical and practical relevance of these findings are analysed and some directions are provided for future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Ray, Pradeep, Information Systems, Technology & Management, Australian School of Business, UNSW, Tseng, Chung-Li, Information Systems, Technology & Management, Australian School of Business, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Patients’ perception; mHealth; Discriminant analysis; Quality Function Deployment (QFD); House of Quality (HoQ); Ubiquity; Information-quality; Value; Comparative analysis; Health care services; Developing countries; Services design

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Motamarri, S. (2013). Distinguishing mHealth from other health care alternatives in developing countries: a study on service characteristics. (Masters Thesis). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52821 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11494/SOURCE01?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Motamarri, Saradhi. “Distinguishing mHealth from other health care alternatives in developing countries: a study on service characteristics.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of New South Wales. Accessed October 29, 2020. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52821 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11494/SOURCE01?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Motamarri, Saradhi. “Distinguishing mHealth from other health care alternatives in developing countries: a study on service characteristics.” 2013. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Motamarri S. Distinguishing mHealth from other health care alternatives in developing countries: a study on service characteristics. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2013. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52821 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11494/SOURCE01?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Motamarri S. Distinguishing mHealth from other health care alternatives in developing countries: a study on service characteristics. [Masters Thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2013. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52821 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11494/SOURCE01?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Chen, Wenlin. On Health Care-Associated Infection Control in the Presence of Health Care Workers’ Strategic Hand Hygiene Behaviour.

Degree: Information Systems, Technology & Management, 2016, University of New South Wales

Every year, millions of patients in the world suffer from health care-associated infections (HCAIs) caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB). ARB are transmitted to patients in a ward by temporarily contaminated hands of health care workers (HCWs) in patient-care activities. Therefore, hand hygiene of HCWs is an important and effective way to prevent ARB transmission among patients and ensure patient safety. However, HCWs wash their hands with high compliance in some situations, but with low compliance in other situations. Namely, they wash their hands strategically. HCWs’ strategic hand hygiene behaviour has been observed to lead to a generally low compliance. This research studies HCWs’ strategic hand hygiene behaviour and provides guidance to hospitals about intervention decision-making to improve compliance. In particular, a strategic behaviour model is developed by using an evolutionary game to understand how HCWs adjust their hand washing behaviour because of peer influence in intensive interactions. This model suggests three contingent behaviours that depend heavily on peers’ choices: bandwagoning, free-riding, and prosocial hand hygiene behaviour. The conditions for how contingent behaviours appear are also identified. In addition, this study investigates the drivers for these contingent behaviours by conducting a discrete choice experiment (DCE) and best-worst scaling experiment (BWS). The DCE and BWS are also used to provide further insights on how hospitals can design effective interventions, from the perspective of a HCW. This study uses inspection policy as an example of an intervention in order to illustrate how to use a decision model that integrates an evolutionary game model and a transmission dynamics model for the allocation of resources for hand hygiene interventions. Advisors/Committee Members: Tseng, Chung-Li, Information Systems, Technology & Management, Australian School of Business, UNSW, Yang, Shu-Jung (Sunny), University of Southampton.

Subjects/Keywords: Evolutionary game theory; Health care management; Behavioral operations management; Discrete choice experiment; Best-worst scaling experiment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, W. (2016). On Health Care-Associated Infection Control in the Presence of Health Care Workers’ Strategic Hand Hygiene Behaviour. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55433 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37544/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Wenlin. “On Health Care-Associated Infection Control in the Presence of Health Care Workers’ Strategic Hand Hygiene Behaviour.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed October 29, 2020. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55433 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37544/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Wenlin. “On Health Care-Associated Infection Control in the Presence of Health Care Workers’ Strategic Hand Hygiene Behaviour.” 2016. Web. 29 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Chen W. On Health Care-Associated Infection Control in the Presence of Health Care Workers’ Strategic Hand Hygiene Behaviour. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 29]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55433 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37544/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Chen W. On Health Care-Associated Infection Control in the Presence of Health Care Workers’ Strategic Hand Hygiene Behaviour. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2016. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55433 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37544/SOURCE02?view=true

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