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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Travaglia, Joanne, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Jayasinha, Ranmalie. Beyond 'insiders on the outside': Discursive constructions of second generation immigrant identity and belonging amongst young adults of New Zealand descent in Sydney, Australia.

Degree: Public Health & Community Medicine, 2015, University of New South Wales

Studies of immigrant experience have tended to privilege a first generation immigrant-centred framework, including in research on second generation immigrant identity. This has led to the construction of this group as 'insiders on the outside', struggling to navigate cultural divides between family, community and host society. In challenging this conceptualisation I employed a poststructuralist approach, informed by intersectionality and Discourse theories, to explore the discursive constructions of second generation immigrant identity and belonging amongst young adults of New Zealand descent in Sydney, Australia. First, I examined how the subject position of the 'New Zealand immigrant' has been discursively articulated in relation to the nation-state Australia utilising a genealogical analysis of texts and a discourse analysis of media articles related to trans-Tasman migration and settlement. Second, drawing on in-depth interviews, I explored the lived experiences of participants born in Australia of New Zealand descent as they negotiated their identity and belonging within the confines of this discursive terrain. Findings from this study demonstrate that the subject position of the 'New Zealand second generation immigrant' is consistently figured as the 'almost similar other' to the 'host' Australia. The operation of logics of equivalence and difference between Australia and New Zealand, articulated through myths related to historical and cultural similarities and to racial and class-based differences, serve to structure the New Zealand second generation immigrant subject position. This positioning in turn serves to reinforce the nation building agenda of Australia as a multicultural society, where the 'New Zealand immigrant' is a constitutive outside to the 'Australian' identity. Participants’ experiences of belonging highlighted the shifting role of national identifications through participation in transnational social fields. Interactions across local, national and transnational landscapes led to fluctuating identifications, characterised by differing levels of allegiance, ambiguity and displacement within both contexts. Negotiating dislocationary moments of othering, participants sought to engage in an alternative space not directly linked to national identifications. They asserted their political subjectivity by occupying highly localised subject positions, established through relational engagements with everyday spaces in Australia and New Zealand. Advisors/Committee Members: Travaglia, Joanne, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Bunde-Birouste, Anne, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Belonging; Second generation immigrant; Identity; Discourse Theory; Intersectionality; Qualitative

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APA (6th Edition):

Jayasinha, R. (2015). Beyond 'insiders on the outside': Discursive constructions of second generation immigrant identity and belonging amongst young adults of New Zealand descent in Sydney, Australia. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55102 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:36533/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jayasinha, Ranmalie. “Beyond 'insiders on the outside': Discursive constructions of second generation immigrant identity and belonging amongst young adults of New Zealand descent in Sydney, Australia.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55102 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:36533/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jayasinha, Ranmalie. “Beyond 'insiders on the outside': Discursive constructions of second generation immigrant identity and belonging amongst young adults of New Zealand descent in Sydney, Australia.” 2015. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Jayasinha R. Beyond 'insiders on the outside': Discursive constructions of second generation immigrant identity and belonging amongst young adults of New Zealand descent in Sydney, Australia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55102 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:36533/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Jayasinha R. Beyond 'insiders on the outside': Discursive constructions of second generation immigrant identity and belonging amongst young adults of New Zealand descent in Sydney, Australia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2015. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55102 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:36533/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Shih, Patti. The Biopolitics of Change: A Foucauldian analysis of Christian healthcare and HIV prevention in Papua New Guinea.

Degree: Community Medicine, 2015, University of New South Wales

Foucault’s notion of biopower analyses the ways in which HIV prevention is understood and practised by healthcare workers from two Christian faith-based health services in Papua New Guinea. HIV prevention practices are biopolitical interventions which carry an imperative to preserve health, effecting a myriad of changes in healthcare workers’ and their client’s conceptualisation of individual responsibility, sexuality and culture. Healthcare workers in this study intrinsically combine Christian moral frameworks with their HIV prevention practices. In fact, modern frameworks of health promotion share a genealogy of “pastoral power” with Christian forms of moral reform, whereby figures of authority heuristically guide others to become self-responsible and active agents of their own wellbeing. Through their engagement with HIV prevention knowledge, people become subjects of power; subjects come to know themselves and justify their actions through a biological existence – one that is sharply defined by an apprehension to HIV risk. There is a call among healthcare workers to defy customary speech taboos and “openly talk about sex”, as it is assumed that once informed by scientific knowledge of sex and its potential health risks, behavioural change would follow. Another assertion is that cultural practices such as polygyny and bride price increase HIV risk. This contradicts to another explanation which suggests that it was the breakdown of culture in the midst of social and economic change that has modified the contemporary practices of polygyny and bride price that have led to HIV. Biopolitical notions of self-reflection and self-reform were first initiated by colonial and missionary power. Today, this knowledge/power continues to circulate via global health programs. This form of self-regulation is more insidious because healthcare workers and their clients in the local community willingly embrace healthcare knowledges via their own active agency. Yet externally produced healthcare and scientific knowledge is often at tension with people’s own experiences in the Papua New Guinean setting. The challenges of HIV prevention can be explained by the contradictions presented in the exercise of power. Subjects are agonised by the freedom offered by autonomous agency and the implicit discipline of dominant frameworks of healthcare knowledge. Advisors/Committee Members: Worth, Heather, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Travaglia, Joanne, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Faith-based organisations; HIV prevention; Papua New Guinea; Biopower; Power/knowledge; Foucault; Pastoral power; Sex education; Cultural change; Global health; Healthcare practices; Religion and health; Melanesian Christianity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shih, P. (2015). The Biopolitics of Change: A Foucauldian analysis of Christian healthcare and HIV prevention in Papua New Guinea. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55298 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37065/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shih, Patti. “The Biopolitics of Change: A Foucauldian analysis of Christian healthcare and HIV prevention in Papua New Guinea.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55298 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37065/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shih, Patti. “The Biopolitics of Change: A Foucauldian analysis of Christian healthcare and HIV prevention in Papua New Guinea.” 2015. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Shih P. The Biopolitics of Change: A Foucauldian analysis of Christian healthcare and HIV prevention in Papua New Guinea. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55298 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37065/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Shih P. The Biopolitics of Change: A Foucauldian analysis of Christian healthcare and HIV prevention in Papua New Guinea. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2015. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55298 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37065/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

3. Arkles, Rachelle. 'Between Shadow and Light': A hermeneutic inquiry of Aboriginal families' meaningful world of caring, ageing and dementia.

Degree: Public Health & Community Medicine, 2014, University of New South Wales

Dementia in Australia's Indigenous population is an area of growing public health concern with prevalence rates three to five times higher than for the non-Indigenous population. In both ageing populations, Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia are the two most common causes of dementia. A number of scholarly paradigms traverse the dementia field. This range shifts from the portrayal of dementia in predominantly Western diagnostic terms on the one hand, to cultural approaches for Indigenous populations on the other. This thesis highlights the 'lived relation' of research in the human encounter of the ageing and dementia experience. The study began with the centrality of the family caregiver in an Indigenous 'world' of ageing and dementia and then moved into a focus on 'being-in-research' in this complex space. The study used the methods of in-depth conversational interviews with family caregivers, 'yarning circles' with carers and community members in a group setting, and detailed journaling to facilitate critical thinking. Phenomenological, existential and hermeneutic analysis and writing techniques were used to take the reader deep inside the immersive space of these 'worlds'. The study approached the scholarship as a philosophy and methodology and as an existential method for 'being-in' the practice of the research. The work drew on the way time and history are expressed in human experiencing which resonates deeply with Indigenous thought. The study provides original research in an area of growing public health concern and contributes to an emerging literature on the experience of carers in Australia, in particular, the experience of Aboriginal carers in urban communities. It recognises the importance of reflexivity in developing researcher presence for the complexity and richness of research and practice in both the dementia and Indigenous health fields. Advisors/Committee Members: Jackson Pulver, Lisa, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Travaglia, Joanne, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Aboriginal or Indigenous; Dementia; Caregivers; Hermeneutic phenomenology; Existential

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Arkles, R. (2014). 'Between Shadow and Light': A hermeneutic inquiry of Aboriginal families' meaningful world of caring, ageing and dementia. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54506 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35126/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arkles, Rachelle. “'Between Shadow and Light': A hermeneutic inquiry of Aboriginal families' meaningful world of caring, ageing and dementia.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54506 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35126/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arkles, Rachelle. “'Between Shadow and Light': A hermeneutic inquiry of Aboriginal families' meaningful world of caring, ageing and dementia.” 2014. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Arkles R. 'Between Shadow and Light': A hermeneutic inquiry of Aboriginal families' meaningful world of caring, ageing and dementia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54506 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35126/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Arkles R. 'Between Shadow and Light': A hermeneutic inquiry of Aboriginal families' meaningful world of caring, ageing and dementia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54506 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35126/SOURCE02?view=true

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