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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Trahair, Lisa, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Klika, Deborah. Comedy and struggle: an analysis of comic operation in the television sitcom.

Degree: English, Media, & Performing Arts, 2010, University of New South Wales

This study analyses the comic operation of the television sitcom. It does so by examining the behaviour of the sitcom character, the relationships between characters, and how their actions determine or are determined by the narrative.In reading three Australian texts, Pizza (SBSTV), Kath & Kim (ABCTV) and Acropolis Now (ATN7), this study identifies the entrapment of the comic protagonist(s) as a key defining motif of the television sitcom. It begins with the premise that the comic character is what Henri Bergson defines as an unconscious victim. Using psychoanalytic theory, I argue that their entrapment derives from an unconscious struggle for identity through a relationship with a “discursive frame” delivered through the narrative. This study proposes that the sitcom can be read asking the question: whose struggle is it, and how is that struggle manifested?Chapter One analyses the sitcom character(s) as suffering some degree of narcissistic personality disorder. I demonstrate that such characters are driven to achieve an idealisation of themselves that is at odds with the world around them. I show how these characters are trapped in a situation that either they attempt to master, or from which they attempt to escape. At the same time, they are unaware of what prevents them from achieving their goal, and in their failure they suffer comic degradation.Chapter Two examines how these characters‟ feelings of fear and anxiety affect their behaviour. I argue that for some characters their entrapment is borne of a disempowerment that exists in their relationships and is reinforced by the particularity of given situations. This dynamic is unknown to the character.Chapter Three extends the examination of the character‟s narcissism to observe that, in response to the diegetic reality brought to bear through the narrative, some characters make choices that maintain their idealisation; in so doing they contribute to the definitive closed narrative structure of the sitcom.Using Umberto Eco‟s notion of comic „frames‟, I argue that the relationship between the character and a discursive frame produces the comic effect. In exposing such frames, I propose that the sitcom can challenge social norms and expectations. Advisors/Committee Members: Trahair, Lisa, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW, McCallum, John, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Narrative comedy; Australian television comedy; Sitcom

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Klika, D. (2010). Comedy and struggle: an analysis of comic operation in the television sitcom. (Masters Thesis). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/45080 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:8375/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Klika, Deborah. “Comedy and struggle: an analysis of comic operation in the television sitcom.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of New South Wales. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/45080 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:8375/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Klika, Deborah. “Comedy and struggle: an analysis of comic operation in the television sitcom.” 2010. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Klika D. Comedy and struggle: an analysis of comic operation in the television sitcom. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/45080 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:8375/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Klika D. Comedy and struggle: an analysis of comic operation in the television sitcom. [Masters Thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2010. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/45080 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:8375/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Carrigy, Megan Jane. Performing history, troubling reference: tracking the screen re-enactment.

Degree: English, Media, & Performing Arts, 2011, University of New South Wales

While the re-enactment is a form of historical representation that has not received the serious critical attention it deserves, it continues to be a pervasive form of historical representation in film and television. It plays a key role in a number of genres (most notably the documentary, the docudrama, and the biopic) and frequently appears in less expected locations (including video installations, remakes and police procedural television). While re-enactments pre-date cinema, it is cinema—and the technically reproducible image more generally—that has played a crucial role in the development of the re-enactment as both a form of historical representation and a genre. This thesis explores the pervasiveness of the re-enactment in film and other screen based media, tracking its evolution, its mobility and its adaptability in a range of genres and institutional contexts.This thesis argues that in all its diverse manifestations, the re-enactment is always caught between two agendas. On the one hand it sets out to take things literally, to repeat things as they happened, and on the other seeks to foreground itself as a re-enactment, which requires that it self-reflexively foregrounds its theatrical, performative nature. Focussing on the tension between these two agendas, this thesis builds a ‘back history’ for the re-enactment and pursues its dispersal into areas where its persistence has not typically been acknowledged.Because re-enactments perform pre-existing events, the issue of reference is paramount. To date, however, the questions that the re-enactment poses for reference have been overlooked in film and television debates. This thesis addresses this theoretical void by engaging critically with film theory debates that examine the relationship between technical reproducibility, time and reference. It argues that the re-enactment cannot be understood outside of its mediation and its relation to time, identifying transformations in the re-enactment that continue to take place as a result of its incorporation in different forms of technical media. It examines the functions of theatricality, temporality and indexicality in the re-enactment, investigating how these have developed in relation to shifts in the conceptualisation of the referential dimensions of the technically reproducible image. This argument is developed through readings of an eclectic array of film, television and video examples. These include early film re-enactments; the storming of the Winter Palace sequence in October (Sergei Eisenstein,1927); the biopics Milk (Gus Van Sant, 2008), Control (Anton Corbijn, 2007), Monster (Patty Jenkins, 2003) and Boys Don’t Cry (Kimberly Peirce, 1999); television drama CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (2000- ); Gus Van Sant’s Psycho (1998); Douglas Gordon’s 24 Hour Psycho (1993); and the uses to which the video of police assaulting Rodney King were put in the court case California v. Powell, Koon, Wind and Briseno (1992). Advisors/Committee Members: Brooks, Jodi, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW, Trahair, Lisa, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Historical representation; Re-enactment; Film theory; Reference

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Carrigy, M. J. (2011). Performing history, troubling reference: tracking the screen re-enactment. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51372 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10054/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carrigy, Megan Jane. “Performing history, troubling reference: tracking the screen re-enactment.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51372 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10054/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carrigy, Megan Jane. “Performing history, troubling reference: tracking the screen re-enactment.” 2011. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Carrigy MJ. Performing history, troubling reference: tracking the screen re-enactment. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51372 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10054/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Carrigy MJ. Performing history, troubling reference: tracking the screen re-enactment. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2011. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51372 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10054/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

3. Tyrrell, Kimberley. The monsters next door: representations of whiteness and monstrosity in contemporary culture.

Degree: English, Media, & Performing Arts, 2007, University of New South Wales

The focus of this thesis is the examination of whiteness as a dominant identity and subject position. Whiteness has conventionally assumed a normative, monolithic status as the template of humanity. Recent theorising has attempted to specify and denaturalise whiteness. In order to participate in this fracturing of whiteness, I analyse examples in which it functions as a site of contested and ambiguous contradiction. To this end, I use contemporary monstrosity to examine whiteness. Monstrosity is a malleable and culturally specific category of difference that measures alterity, and by displaying discursive functions in an extreme form offers insight into the ways in which deviance and normativity operate. I argue that the conjunction of whiteness and monstrosity, through displaying whiteness in a negative register, depicts some of the discursive operations that enable whiteness to attain such hegemonic dominance. I deploy theories of marginalisation and subjectivation drawn from a variety of feminist, critical race, and philosophical perspectives in order to further an understanding of the discursive operations of hegemonic and normative subject positions. I offer a brief history and overview of both the history and prior conceptualisations of monstrosity and whiteness, and then focus on two particular examples of contemporary white monstrosity. I closely examine the representation of monstrosity in serial killer films. The figure of the serial killer is typically a white, heterosexual, middle class male whose monstrosity is implicitly reliant upon these elements. In my discussion of the recent phenomenon of fatal shootings at high schools in North America, I investigate the way the massacre at Columbine High School functions as the public face of the phenomenon and for the unique interest it generated in the mass media. I focus on a Time magazine cover that featured a photograph of the adolescent perpetrators under the heading The Monsters Next Door, which condensed and emblematised the tension that they generated. It is through the perpetrators uneasy occupation of dual subject positions namely the unassuming all American boy and the contemporary face of evil that their simultaneous representation as average and alien undermines the notion of whiteness as neutral and invisible. Advisors/Committee Members: Trahair, Lisa , English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Monsters in literature; Horror films  – History and criticism; Serial murderers; whites

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tyrrell, K. (2007). The monsters next door: representations of whiteness and monstrosity in contemporary culture. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/35639 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:2162/SOURCE2?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tyrrell, Kimberley. “The monsters next door: representations of whiteness and monstrosity in contemporary culture.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/35639 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:2162/SOURCE2?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tyrrell, Kimberley. “The monsters next door: representations of whiteness and monstrosity in contemporary culture.” 2007. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Tyrrell K. The monsters next door: representations of whiteness and monstrosity in contemporary culture. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2007. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/35639 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:2162/SOURCE2?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Tyrrell K. The monsters next door: representations of whiteness and monstrosity in contemporary culture. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2007. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/35639 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:2162/SOURCE2?view=true

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