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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Thurbon, Elizabeth, Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Peters, Michael. A Remarkable Place at a Remarkable Time: Australian Foreign Direct Investment Screening as Governmental Foreign Policy.

Degree: Social Sciences, 2017, University of New South Wales

In this thesis I explain the changes made to Australia’s foreign direct investment (FDI) screening policy by the first Rudd Government (2007-10). The changes were made in response to a wave of large investments by Chinese sovereign-owned enterprises in the Australian resource sector. These were interpreted by the Rudd Government as a threat to the integrity of Australian markets, and to the sovereign right of the Australian Government to define the nature of those markets. The Australian Government aimed to draw on the leverage born of its sovereign control over raw resources vital to the Chinese economic transformation to insert Australia into a conversation on the rules of a new regional order. Neither the strategic depth of the Rudd Government’s engagement with China, nor the centrality of FDI screening policy to that engagement, have yet been fully appreciated. The policy contains the key to the Australian understanding of the problems associated with deeper economic integration with the emerging superpower. These problems were at once geopolitical, economic, and ideological. As the relationship with China can be expected to dominate Australian foreign policymaking for the coming decades, understanding the precise nature of this nexus of concerns has enormous value for both policymakers and analysts.To explain the departures that appeared in the policy, I draw on Foucauldian governmentality. I show that the construction of the policy problem conformed strongly to governmental precepts, and that the experiments with foreign policymaking that appeared can usefully be thought of as experiments with the neoliberal governmental state. Governmentality offers a set of theoretical constructs that transcend the dividing lines between economics, geopolitics, and ideology that appear in liberal economic and political theory. As a theory based on the insight that the liberal state, and the formations that appear in it, are not natural, but historically and contingently produced, governmentality is well-placed to conceptualise the issues that arise in the historically unique integration of a liberal economy with a much larger illiberal one. Advisors/Committee Members: Thurbon, Elizabeth, Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW, Clapton, William, Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Australia; Foreign Direct Investment; Foreign Policy; Governmentality

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APA (6th Edition):

Peters, M. (2017). A Remarkable Place at a Remarkable Time: Australian Foreign Direct Investment Screening as Governmental Foreign Policy. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57245 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:42950/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Peters, Michael. “A Remarkable Place at a Remarkable Time: Australian Foreign Direct Investment Screening as Governmental Foreign Policy.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57245 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:42950/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Peters, Michael. “A Remarkable Place at a Remarkable Time: Australian Foreign Direct Investment Screening as Governmental Foreign Policy.” 2017. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Peters M. A Remarkable Place at a Remarkable Time: Australian Foreign Direct Investment Screening as Governmental Foreign Policy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2017. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57245 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:42950/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Peters M. A Remarkable Place at a Remarkable Time: Australian Foreign Direct Investment Screening as Governmental Foreign Policy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2017. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/57245 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:42950/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Venner, Mary. Post conflict reconstruction as development: donors, context and institutions in Kosovo.

Degree: Social Sciences, 2014, University of New South Wales

In June 1999, at the end of the conflict in Kosovo, a large number of international organisations, donors and technical advisers began the task of establishing a new public administration in the territory. The aim of this thesis is to assess the results of this effort more than a decade later and to identify the factors that contributed to its successes and failures. Much of the academic literature on this period in Kosovo discusses the activities of international actors in terms of ‘post conflict reconstruction’ or ‘peacebuilding’, however much of what was done was essentially the same as what these actors do elsewhere under the label of development assistance, involving the same organisations, with the same broad objectives and using the same methods. The thesis thus considers post conflict Kosovo as an example of development assistance and discusses it in terms of the literature, ideas and practices of development assistance. The thesis examines why the major participants in the exercise felt a need to become involved in Kosovo in the way they did, what they expected to achieve, how they tried to achieve it, and how relationships between them affected their work. It then documents the combined impact of their activities on the development of institutions in public finance and civil service management over an extended period, and assesses the extent to which their efforts in these areas can be considered successful, measured against the stated objectives. Although international actors did not succeed in their more ambitious goals, in some fields they have had a positive impact and achieved what they set out to achieve. In other sectors, however, the results have been disappointing and the current Kosovo administration continues to struggle with the consequences of these failures. The thesis considers several factors that may explain these uneven outcomes and argues that the actions of the lead donors, the level of resources applied, and the methods they used were the most important variables in determining outcomes, although the post conflict context, and the nature of the public sector institutions themselves, were also relevant. Advisors/Committee Members: Williams, Marc, Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW, Thurbon, Elizabeth, Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Public administration development; Kosovo; Post conflict reconstruction; Public finance development

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Venner, M. (2014). Post conflict reconstruction as development: donors, context and institutions in Kosovo. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53534 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12229/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Venner, Mary. “Post conflict reconstruction as development: donors, context and institutions in Kosovo.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53534 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12229/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Venner, Mary. “Post conflict reconstruction as development: donors, context and institutions in Kosovo.” 2014. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Venner M. Post conflict reconstruction as development: donors, context and institutions in Kosovo. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53534 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12229/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Venner M. Post conflict reconstruction as development: donors, context and institutions in Kosovo. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53534 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12229/SOURCE02?view=true

.