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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Samocha-Bonet, Dorit, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Tang, Alice. Insulin-Sensitive Obesity: Prospective and Interventional Studies.

Degree: Clinical School - St Vincent's Hospital, 2017, University of New South Wales

BACKGROUND: Individuals with metabolically healthy/insulin-sensitive obesity (MHO/Obsen) have been shown to have a comparable metabolic profile to lean individuals. However, longitudinal change in metabolic parameters in those with MHO/Obsen has not been comprehensively delineated with the gold-standard measure of insulin-sensitivity, the hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. The response of MHO/ Obsen cohorts to weight loss is also unclear. This study investigates the metabolic changes in the Obsen phenotype over time and in response to weight loss. METHODS: A cohort of 124 individuals was carefully phenotyped 6 years ago and categorised into lean, overweight/obese insulin-sensitive (Obsen) or resistant (Obres, using gender based median insulin-sensitivity cut-offs) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sixty-nine participants were followed up in this study. A subcohort (n = 13) also underwent a 16-week caloric restriction intervention. A comprehensive assessment of metabolic health, including insulin sensitivity (using hyperinsulinaemic-euglcyaemic clamp), body fat composition, serum/plasma metabolic markers, energy metabolism and lifestyle parameters, was performed.RESULTS: There was an increase in total body fat, visceral adipose tissue mass, blood pressure and adipose tissue insulin resistance and a decrease in resting metabolic rate in the whole cohort over 6 years. Insulin sensitivity appeared to decrease over time in Obsen compared to the other groups. Physical activity increased and sugar intake decreased in Obres and T2DM. Saturated fat and trans-fat intake increased in the Obsen group. Insulin sensitivity in the 6 years prior to weight loss was inversely correlated to the change in insulin sensitivity induced by weight loss. Insulin sensitivity immediately prior to weight loss was inversely correlated to the change in resting metabolic rate induced by weight loss.CONCLUSION: Obsen is not an enduring phenotype over 6 years. Hence, clinical intervention should target all individuals with overweight/obesity, irrespective of apparent metabolic health. However, further investigation into the role that insulin sensitivity plays in the response to weight loss is required to ensure optimum management in Obsen individuals. Advisors/Committee Members: Greenfield, Jerry, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Samocha-Bonet, Dorit, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Insulin resistance; Obesity; Insulin sensitivity

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APA (6th Edition):

Tang, A. (2017). Insulin-Sensitive Obesity: Prospective and Interventional Studies. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/58936 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:47978/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tang, Alice. “Insulin-Sensitive Obesity: Prospective and Interventional Studies.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/58936 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:47978/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tang, Alice. “Insulin-Sensitive Obesity: Prospective and Interventional Studies.” 2017. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Tang A. Insulin-Sensitive Obesity: Prospective and Interventional Studies. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/58936 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:47978/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Tang A. Insulin-Sensitive Obesity: Prospective and Interventional Studies. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2017. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/58936 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:47978/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Kozan, Pinar. The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans.

Degree: St Vincent's Clinical School, 2018, University of New South Wales

Background: High dietary acid load relates to increased risk of type 2 diabetes in epidemiological studies. We aimed to investigate whether buffering a high acid load meal with an alkalising treatment changes post meal glucose metabolism. Methods: Non-diabetic participants (n=32) were randomized to receive either NaHCO3 1680mg or placebo, followed by a high acid load meal in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover (1-4 weeks apart) study. Thirty (20 males) participants completed the study. Venous blood pH, serum bicarbonate, blood glucose, serum insulin, C-peptide, non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), and plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations were measured at baseline (fasting) and at 15-30min intervals for 3h post meal. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. Venous blood pH declined in the first 15min post meal with the placebo (p=0.001), but not with NaHCO3 (p=0.86) and remained lower with the placebo for 3h (pinteraction=0.04). The iAUC of pH was significantly higher following the NaHCO3 treatment versus the placebo (p=0.02). However, postprandial glucose, insulin, C-peptide, NEFA and GLP-1 were not different between treatments (pinteraction‚Č•0.07). Conclusions: An alkalising medication administered pre-meal has no acute effect on glycaemia and insulin response in healthy individuals. Long-term interventions in at-risk populations are necessary to investigate the effect of sustained alkalisation on glucose metabolism. Advisors/Committee Members: Greenfield , Jerry, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Samocha-Bonet, Dorit, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: acid-base homeostasis; alkaline diet; dietary acid load; type 2 diabetes; sodium bicarbonate; postprandial glycaemia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kozan, P. (2018). The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans. (Masters Thesis). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59592 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:49042/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kozan, Pinar. “The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of New South Wales. Accessed October 19, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59592 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:49042/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kozan, Pinar. “The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans.” 2018. Web. 19 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Kozan P. The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 19]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59592 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:49042/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Kozan P. The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans. [Masters Thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2018. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59592 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:49042/SOURCE02?view=true

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