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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Richters, Juliet, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Watkins, Paula Grace. "Everybody suffers": Karen refugee women's experiences and conceptualisations of wellbeing and distress.

Degree: Public Health & Community Medicine, 2012, University of New South Wales

Studies of refugee mental health have largely focused on epidemiological assessments of posttraumatic stress disorder and other diagnoses using Western-derived assessment measures. However, research has increasingly highlighted the role of culture in shaping refugee mental wellbeing and suggests that local idioms of distress may be more salient to refugee populations than Western-derived constructs of psychopathology. The central aim of the study was to explore experiences and perceptions of suffering and distress amongst Karen refugee women in Sydney, Australia. The Karen, an ethnic group from Burma, have been gravely affected by decades of conflict and human rights abuses in their homeland yet there is a dearth of information concerning their psychosocial needs. Informed by a critical realist theoretical paradigm, the research was guided by ethnographic, feminist and grounded theory methodological traditions. Data was drawn from over 200 hours of ethnographic observations and 67 interviews with Karen women and key informants between 2009 and 2011. Data analysis was based on principles of grounded theory. The findings revealed important relationships between pre-migration cultural context, persecutory experiences (including but not limited to trauma), post-migration psychosocial stressors and current experiences of emotional distress. Women’s daily social and material stressors, such as interacting with service providers, were central to their distress. They conceptualised their experiences of suffering and trauma within cultural frameworks and idioms of distress, which often differed from the Western psychiatric models. Karen women primarily coped through traditional community and religious networks. Language was a key barrier to seeking support from Australian service providers. Women’s timidity and communication patterns, stemming from the interplay of cultural, gendered and pre-migration experiences, were further barriers. The study contributes to an empirical understanding of Karen refugee women’s experiences and conceptualisations of mental wellbeing. It enhances existing knowledge and developments in cross-cultural mental health and adds a new dimension by demonstrating how pre-migration culture, refugee-specific migration experiences, post-migration difficulties and wellbeing were linked through the interconnected issues of power(lessness), use(fulness) and identity. The findings have implications for service provision and suggest that Western mental health practitioners should reflexively explore prevailing discourses concerning traumatic suffering and healing. Advisors/Committee Members: Razee, Husna, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Richters, Juliet, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; Refugee; Mental health; Burma

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Watkins, P. G. (2012). "Everybody suffers": Karen refugee women's experiences and conceptualisations of wellbeing and distress. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52081 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10751/SOURCE01?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Watkins, Paula Grace. “"Everybody suffers": Karen refugee women's experiences and conceptualisations of wellbeing and distress.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52081 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10751/SOURCE01?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Watkins, Paula Grace. “"Everybody suffers": Karen refugee women's experiences and conceptualisations of wellbeing and distress.” 2012. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Watkins PG. "Everybody suffers": Karen refugee women's experiences and conceptualisations of wellbeing and distress. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52081 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10751/SOURCE01?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Watkins PG. "Everybody suffers": Karen refugee women's experiences and conceptualisations of wellbeing and distress. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52081 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10751/SOURCE01?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Egan, Caroline Elizabeth. Sexual behaviour of international backpackers in the context of travel in Australia.

Degree: National Centre in HIV Social Research, 2009, University of New South Wales

This study is the first to collect detailed empirical data on sexual practice among backpackers while exploring the material and social context of backpacking using an ethnographic framework. The theoretical concepts of liminality and sexual scripts were drawn on to analyse the findings. Backpackers were recruited from hostels in Sydney and Cairns; 559 backpackers (243 women, 316 men) completed an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. In addition, 25 in-depth one-to-one interviews with backpackers and 25 semi-structured interviews were conducted with sexual health and travel clinic staff and hostel service providers. Participant and non-participant observation in backpacker hostels also informed the analysis.Drinking alcohol, often to excess, was central to the backpacking setting and was both a reason for and a post-facto justification of unprotected sex. The backpacking setting encouraged transient liaisons. More than half (55%) of backpackers had sex with someone new during their trip and for 71% of them it was with someone that they had just met that day. Twenty-five per cent of those with no expectations to have casual sex on their trip and 22% of those with no previous experience of casual sex had casual sex during their trip. More than half (53%) of those who had sex with a someone new did so while other people were in the room. Only 55% always used a condom with their last new partner. While most backpackers carried condoms and intended to use them, unprotected sex was common. Perception of risk was low: 78% of those who did not use a condom the last time they had casual sex on the trip perceived their risk of getting HIV to be “low” to “nil”. Three participants acquired HIV during their trip. The culture of backpacking encourages more sexually permissive attitudes but does not encourage condom use, especially for those who did not consistently use condoms at home. These findings highlight the need for more broad-based dissemination of information on STIs to young people, and for future sexual health campaigns to specifically target backpackers in the context in which they travel. Advisors/Committee Members: Richters, Juliet, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Kippax, Susan, National Centre in HIV Social Research, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Backpackers; Sex; Travel; Sexual risk; Sexual health

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Egan, C. E. (2009). Sexual behaviour of international backpackers in the context of travel in Australia. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/43550 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:4769/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Egan, Caroline Elizabeth. “Sexual behaviour of international backpackers in the context of travel in Australia.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/43550 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:4769/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Egan, Caroline Elizabeth. “Sexual behaviour of international backpackers in the context of travel in Australia.” 2009. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Egan CE. Sexual behaviour of international backpackers in the context of travel in Australia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/43550 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:4769/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Egan CE. Sexual behaviour of international backpackers in the context of travel in Australia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2009. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/43550 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:4769/SOURCE02?view=true

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