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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Newton, Nicola, National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Champion, Katrina. Paying attention to prevention: An Internet-based framework to address alcohol, cannabis, ecstasy and new psychoactive substance use.

Degree: National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, 2015, University of New South Wales

Alcohol and cannabis, the most commonly used substances in most developed countries, are associated with a range of adverse consequences. Although less prevalent, the use of ecstasy and new psychoactive substances (NPS) that mimic the effects of traditional illicit drugs, are associated with significant harms. As such, early and effective prevention is critical. School is the ideal setting to deliver prevention, however existing programs are limited in their efficacy, sustainability and ability to engage students. In addition, there are no existing evidence-based prevention programs for NPS. The overall aim of this thesis was to advance responses to school-based prevention for alcohol and other drug (AOD) use by investigating the utility of the Internet in overcoming these limitations.A systematic review demonstrated the efficacy of computer- and Internet-based prevention programs and highlighted a lack of replication in the field. Building on this, the existing Internet-based Climate Schools: Alcohol and Cannabis course was validated through a cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) in 13 schools (N=1103 students). The intervention was effective in increasing alcohol and cannabis knowledge, reducing alcohol intentions and was well-liked by teachers and students, thereby providing support for the use of the Internet to deliver AOD prevention. Using the Climate Schools framework as a basis, the first universal Internet-based prevention program for ecstasy and NPS was developed in close consultation with students and health professionals. To determine the efficacy of the Climate Schools: Ecstasy & Emerging Drugs module a cluster RCT was run in 11 schools (N=1126 students). Results indicated that ecstasy and NPS use was low among students, and the intervention was effective in increasing short-term knowledge about ecstasy and NPS and reducing future intentions to use NPS.Overall, this thesis makes a unique contribution by empirically demonstrating the value of the Internet in overcoming barriers to effective school-based AOD prevention. Of most importance, the first online school-based prevention program for ecstasy and NPS was developed and evaluated. Due to their online and universal nature, the Climate Schools programs can be readily and sustainably implemented and have the potential to make a broad impact in Australia and worldwide. Advisors/Committee Members: Newton, Nicola, National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Teesson, Maree, National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Internet; Prevention; Substance use; School-based

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APA (6th Edition):

Champion, K. (2015). Paying attention to prevention: An Internet-based framework to address alcohol, cannabis, ecstasy and new psychoactive substance use. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55476 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37798/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Champion, Katrina. “Paying attention to prevention: An Internet-based framework to address alcohol, cannabis, ecstasy and new psychoactive substance use.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55476 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37798/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Champion, Katrina. “Paying attention to prevention: An Internet-based framework to address alcohol, cannabis, ecstasy and new psychoactive substance use.” 2015. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Champion K. Paying attention to prevention: An Internet-based framework to address alcohol, cannabis, ecstasy and new psychoactive substance use. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2015. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55476 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37798/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Champion K. Paying attention to prevention: An Internet-based framework to address alcohol, cannabis, ecstasy and new psychoactive substance use. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2015. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55476 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:37798/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Kelly, Erin. Tackling adolescent bullying head on: Victimisation, perpetration and targeted intervention.

Degree: National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, 2018, University of New South Wales

Bullying among school-aged children is a common issue worldwide and is associated with significant concurrent and prospective emotional and behavioural problems. To date, bullying research and intervention has been limited in several areas, including: the predominance of a narrow focus on bullying types and associated problems; few prospective studies; limited effectiveness of universal interventions for adolescent bullying; and a lack of targeted interventions for bullying and associated harms. This thesis aims to address these gaps through an examination of a cohort of Australian adolescents. Specifically, this thesis aims to: 1) Compare concurrent internalising and externalising problems and suicidal ideation among bullies, victims and bully-victims; 2) Examine concurrent and prospective associations between bullying (victimisation and/or perpetration) and substance use; 3) Examine prospective associations between personality types and bullying (victimisation and perpetration); and 4) Assess an innovative personality-focused approach to bullying intervention (for bullies and victims). This thesis provides novel and important contributions to the bullying literature. Firstly, there was a high prevalence of internalising and externalising problems and suicidal ideation among adolescents involved in all forms of bullying, and particularly among bully-victims. Secondly, there was evidence of a prospective relationship between bully-victim status and risky drinking and cannabis use. Thirdly, personality dimensions predicted both bullying victimisation and bullying perpetration. Finally, a personality-targeted intervention reduced further victimisation, suicidality and internalising problems among victims, and suicidality and externalising problems among bullies. Clinical and research implications are discussed, including: the need for improved understanding of, and addressing the overlap between, bullying victimisation and perpetration and the associated problems; the importance of screening adolescents involved in bullying for externalising problems, internalising problems, and suicidal ideation; a need for further exploration of the role of personality in bullying; and the need for more feasible school-based bullying intervention. Overall, it is clear from this thesis that targeted intervention for adolescents involved in bullying is of vital importance in tackling adolescent bullying and associated harms. Advisors/Committee Members: Teesson, Maree, National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Newton, Nicola, National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Stapinski, Lexine, National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Substance use; Bullying; Mental health; Adolescents; Early intervention

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kelly, E. (2018). Tackling adolescent bullying head on: Victimisation, perpetration and targeted intervention. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60761

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kelly, Erin. “Tackling adolescent bullying head on: Victimisation, perpetration and targeted intervention.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60761.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kelly, Erin. “Tackling adolescent bullying head on: Victimisation, perpetration and targeted intervention.” 2018. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Kelly E. Tackling adolescent bullying head on: Victimisation, perpetration and targeted intervention. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2018. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60761.

Council of Science Editors:

Kelly E. Tackling adolescent bullying head on: Victimisation, perpetration and targeted intervention. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2018. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60761


University of New South Wales

3. Birrell, Louise. Untangling co-morbidity: Alcohol use, anxiety and mood disorders in adolescence.

Degree: National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, 2017, University of New South Wales

It is well known that many individuals with anxiety and mood disorders also experience alcohol use problems (and vice versa). Yet it is unclear when, how and why these problems occur together. The proposed research will investigate these questions among Australian adolescents. Study one and two examine data collected as part of the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. Study one investigates the impact of early onset anxiety disorders on age of first use of alcohol, while study two investigates the impact of early onset mood disorders on first use of alcohol. These studies are the first epidemiological investigations to model the impact of early onset anxiety and mood disorders on age of first alcohol use in a general population sample. Early onset anxiety and mood disorders were found to act as unique risk factors for first alcohol use, particularly after the age of 14 years. Significant interactions with developmental timing highlight the need to take into account age when examining the origins of the comorbidity between alcohol use and mood disorders. Different patterns were also observed in relation to individual anxiety and mood disorders.Study three examines the developmental trajectories of emotional symptoms in a sample of adolescents followed from 13 to 16 years old. Latent class growth analysis uncovered four different trajectories of emotional symptoms. Adolescents whose emotional symptoms remained relatively high-stable across the study period were found to be using alcohol at higher rates at age 16 years, compared to their peers. This is the first time this has been examined in an Australian longitudinal sample. Study four models the concurrent development of emotional symptoms and alcohol use in a cohort of 1,517 early adolescents over two years. Parallel latent growth modelling investigates whether growth in emotional symptoms is related to growth in alcohol use, and vice versa. Higher initial symptom levels predicted increasing alcohol use frequency. There was no relationship between growth in symptoms, or growth in alcohol use in a large sample of early adolescents from the general population.These four novel empirical studies make a significant contribution to the current literature, as well as informing prevention and treatment efforts to reduce the considerable burden of disease, social costs and harms associated with comorbidity. Advisors/Committee Members: Slade, Tim, National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Newton, Nicola, National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Teesson, Maree, National Drug & Alcohol Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Alcohol; Anxiety; Mood disorders; Adolescence

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Birrell, L. (2017). Untangling co-morbidity: Alcohol use, anxiety and mood disorders in adolescence. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/58233 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:45640/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Birrell, Louise. “Untangling co-morbidity: Alcohol use, anxiety and mood disorders in adolescence.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/58233 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:45640/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Birrell, Louise. “Untangling co-morbidity: Alcohol use, anxiety and mood disorders in adolescence.” 2017. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Birrell L. Untangling co-morbidity: Alcohol use, anxiety and mood disorders in adolescence. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2017. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/58233 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:45640/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Birrell L. Untangling co-morbidity: Alcohol use, anxiety and mood disorders in adolescence. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2017. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/58233 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:45640/SOURCE02?view=true

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