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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Mcneill, David , Art History & Art Education, College of Fine Arts, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Goldberg , Louis Michael. Greed, fear and irrational exuberance - the deep play of financial and cultural speculation.

Degree: Art, 2012, University of New South Wales

This thesis is based on a body of work completed between 2001 and 2009, comprisingperformance/installations that addressed the impacts of global financial speculation and themechanisms of a free-market economy. Arguably, financial speculation has either driven, orprofoundly influenced, political policy and social behaviour ‘from Wall Street to Main Street’;from the corporate boardrooms of developed nations to the informal markets of nations stillstruggling to come to terms with the demise of classical socialism in the postmodern world.Each 24-hour cycle of global financial markets, comprising millions of transactions, representsnot only objectively calculated risk management, but also a spectrum of speculators’emotions ranging between greed, fear, and ‘irrational exuberance’. Theperformance/installations included in this thesis address the motivations behind speculativemarket activity, as well as the interaction between the human and technological processesembedded in the markets. Art and cultural critic Brian Holmes posits this interaction as ‘deepplay’, or ‘the aestheticized exploration of the actions and gestures unfolding within a globalmicrostructure’. The microstructure referred to in this thesis is that of the global financialmarket, its foundations, development and impacts on contemporary society. My explorationwill unpack aspects of the history and current manifestations of the free-market economy, andwhile it is not the intention of this thesis to theorise economics, nor the phenomenon ofglobalization, certain premises will be addressed as relevant to the projects. In the process,shared borders between the financial market and art practice have inevitably become blurred.The methodological enquiry that underscores this thesis does not reject the free-marketeconomy, nor speculative financial activity. Instead, I have suggested that they might becritiqued by means of cultural intervention. I imply that by direct participation in capital flows,and through exposure to the fears and anxieties bred in the financial market’s domain, thecomplex elements that have produced, and continue to produce significant impacts onsociety, might be better understood. Advisors/Committee Members: Mcneill, David , Art History & Art Education, College of Fine Arts, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Site specific installation; Contemporary art; Site specific performance; Financial markets and art; Democratisation of media; Democratisation of financial markets; Online trading and art; Computer simulation and online trading; Remote predictive viewing and art; Financial speculation and art; Remote predictive viewing and financial markets; Capital flows and art; Globalism and art; Neo-liberalism and art; Technical analysis and art; Irrational exuberance; Candlestick charting and art; Art intervention; Free-market economy and art; Complex systems and art; Virtual money market and art; Booms; Busts and art

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Goldberg , L. M. (2012). Greed, fear and irrational exuberance - the deep play of financial and cultural speculation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52763 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11436/SOURCE01?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goldberg , Louis Michael. “Greed, fear and irrational exuberance - the deep play of financial and cultural speculation.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed February 16, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52763 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11436/SOURCE01?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goldberg , Louis Michael. “Greed, fear and irrational exuberance - the deep play of financial and cultural speculation.” 2012. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Goldberg LM. Greed, fear and irrational exuberance - the deep play of financial and cultural speculation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52763 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11436/SOURCE01?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Goldberg LM. Greed, fear and irrational exuberance - the deep play of financial and cultural speculation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52763 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11436/SOURCE01?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Oiyama, Toshiko. Dochaku: artistic evolution at the confluence of cultures.

Degree: Art, 2011, University of New South Wales

This research project investigates artistic evolution through the process of dochaku. Originally an agricultural principle, the Japanese term dochaku, meaning ‘of the land,’ signifies a fresh idea from outside being adopted and adapted to suit the local environment, often to the point where it is eventually considered ‘indigenous’ to the locality. Employing this concept of dochaku as a perspective, the research investigates how Frank Lloyd Wright, Pierre Alechinsky, Issey Miyake and Hiroshi Sugito developed their internationally recognized art practices by, among other means, internalising and individualising elements of traditional Japanese culture found in its architecture, calligraphy, textile and painting, respectively. The primary aims of this research are to uncover the individual negotiations in cultural interaction in these cases, and from these discoveries, to formulate a model of artistic evolution by the dochaku process. Unlike the commonly accepted models that rely on concepts such as hybridisation, the research examines cultural interaction with a focus on the process rather than the product. By so doing, it has uncovered that the artists exploit and explore the potentiality of foreign aesthetic elements by ceaseless experimentation, re-contextualisation, and eventual ‘indigenisation’ of the elements into their art, facilitating an evolution of their practice over time. The dochaku perspective has also revealed that the products of cultural interaction can vary widely, ranging from the visibly-mixed to not-visibly-mixed. I have proposed to classify them into three states: the State of Maturation, the State of Visible Conjunction, and the State of a New Paradigm. In contrast, hybridisation models recognise only the visibly-mixed as the proof of cultural interaction.These findings attest to the variety of negotiations possible in cultural interaction, foregrounding the individuality and agency of the artist without typecasting her as a ‘creative genius.’ Furthermore, by recognising the previously un-recognised products of cultural interactions, the research has revealed the ubiquitous nature of cultural interaction. It is likely that the awareness of dochaku process in artistic evolution can help us widen our horizon and deepen our understanding of cultural formation, leading to richer cultural interactions in the world of visual art. Advisors/Committee Members: Ellis, Nichole, Art, College of Fine Arts, UNSW, McNeill, David, Art History & Art Education, College of Fine Arts, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Artistic evolution; Dochaku in art; Cultural interaction in art

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Oiyama, T. (2011). Dochaku: artistic evolution at the confluence of cultures. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51256 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9937/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Oiyama, Toshiko. “Dochaku: artistic evolution at the confluence of cultures.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed February 16, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51256 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9937/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Oiyama, Toshiko. “Dochaku: artistic evolution at the confluence of cultures.” 2011. Web. 16 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Oiyama T. Dochaku: artistic evolution at the confluence of cultures. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2011. [cited 2019 Feb 16]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51256 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9937/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Oiyama T. Dochaku: artistic evolution at the confluence of cultures. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2011. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51256 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9937/SOURCE02?view=true

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