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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Langford, Michelle, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Fotouhi , Sanaz. Ways of being, lines of becoming: a study of post-revolutionary diasporic Iranian literature in Engilsh.

Degree: Arts and Media, 2012, University of New South Wales

The 1978/9 revolution was a turning point in Iranian history. It led not only to drastic regime changes in Iran, but it was also the cause for the migration of millions of Iranians. Ever since then, Iranians have continually migrated and have created their own pockets of communities globally. But like any migratory group, they too have experienced difficulties of migration. Ever since the early days of Iranian migration, many began to write about their experiences. While among them, many wrote in Persian, some began to write in English. Gradually, over the last several decades Iranians have authored nearly two hundred books of fiction and memoir in English. Formed at the junctions of Iranian culture and experience and the English language and Western cultures, this body of work has formed a unique literary space. Not only is it a reflection of diasporic Iranian experiences, but it is also a body of work which draws on and adds to elements of English literature and as such deserves special attention in the so-called category of World Literatures in English. This thesis, Ways of Being, Lines of Becoming, is a study of this body of work. Its aim is two fold. On the one hand it introduces existing and emerging Iranian writing in English into the arena of World Literatures in English. While it situates them alongside other diasporic writing in English and examines them through existing diasporic literary frameworks and theories, such as postcolonialism, it also argues for their distinctiveness. On the other hand, it identifies this body of work as a unique creative discursive space that is reflective of the diasporic Iranian experience. In short, drawing on various psychological theories of the importance of narration and identity, it argues that this literature can be a site through which the Iranian diaspora can reconstruct, maintain and negotiate their individual and communal identities. Advisors/Committee Members: Ashcroft, Bill, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW, Langford, Michelle, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Post-colonial literature; Iranian Literature in English; Iran; World literature in English; Persian literature; Iranian diasporic literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fotouhi , S. (2012). Ways of being, lines of becoming: a study of post-revolutionary diasporic Iranian literature in Engilsh. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51972 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10642/SOURCE01?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fotouhi , Sanaz. “Ways of being, lines of becoming: a study of post-revolutionary diasporic Iranian literature in Engilsh.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed September 16, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51972 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10642/SOURCE01?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fotouhi , Sanaz. “Ways of being, lines of becoming: a study of post-revolutionary diasporic Iranian literature in Engilsh.” 2012. Web. 16 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Fotouhi S. Ways of being, lines of becoming: a study of post-revolutionary diasporic Iranian literature in Engilsh. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. [cited 2019 Sep 16]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51972 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10642/SOURCE01?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Fotouhi S. Ways of being, lines of becoming: a study of post-revolutionary diasporic Iranian literature in Engilsh. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51972 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10642/SOURCE01?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Lewkowicz, Eva Helen. Beyond the happy ending... re-viewing female citizenship within the Mexican telenovela industry.

Degree: English, Media, & Performing Arts, 2011, University of New South Wales

Upon the Mexican telenovela's recent fiftieth anniversary (1958-2008) and the purported changes to form and content throughout its television history, this thesis explores the perpetuation of an exclusionary representational schema at the heart of the telenovela narrative. Seemingly at odds with the privatised, ‘post-national’ nature of the contemporary industry, the continued appearance of nationalist ideologies regarding race and class — but specifically gender and sexuality — within these serialised love stories, is framed through the complex interface between history and industry. This analysis begins with a historical study of official nation-building policies and their manifestation within the culture industries. Tracing nation-building tropes to the Mexican telenovela, this thesis equates the fictional community onscreen with the ‘ideal imagined’ Mexican nation, making the telenovela a prime site of nation-construction within the twenty-first century. Here the narrative's happy ending’ (after an average 120 episodes) is read as a figurative representation of the ideal nation. The Manichaean characterisation inherent to the Mexican telenovela’s melodrama serves to construct an ‘ideal’ female ‘citizen’ within this community. Only those female values and behaviours in line with nationalist ideology are endorsed.Interviews with over twenty Mexican telenovela industry writers, producers, directors, scholars and critics conducted in 2007 and 2008 confirm this schema. Their description of production and consumption processes within this transnational commercial industry provide a comprehensive framework positing the cultural imaginary, the textual dynamics, the commercial imperatives of the industry and audience ‘tastes’ as factors contributing to this exclusionary narrative schema within the contemporary telenovela industry.The textual analysis of seven telenovelas considers how these factors perpetuate exclusionary nationalist discourses within both traditional telenovelas originating from complicit relations between the culture industries and the state, as well as those that purportedly ‘ruptured’ this schema. A detailed formula for nation-construction via tropes of female characterisation inherent to the romantic love story becomes apparent here. Yet in light of the apparent invincibility of this formula, this thesis considers how the industry's economic rationalism can facilitate the ‘rupture’ of the exclusionary narrative schema; through narrative extension of popular telenovelas, and non-romance oriented subgenres for niche markets.Particularly timely considering the Mexican telenovela's recent celebrations, this study considers the fate of such a rich popular-cultural form, in the context of a rapidly changing new media landscape. Advisors/Committee Members: Langford, Michelle, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW, Shaner, Scott, English, Media, & Performing Arts, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Television Industry; Mexico; Telenovela; Soap Opera; Citizenship; Nationalism; Gender; Manichaean; Culture Industry; Genre; Subgenre

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lewkowicz, E. H. (2011). Beyond the happy ending... re-viewing female citizenship within the Mexican telenovela industry. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51257 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9938/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lewkowicz, Eva Helen. “Beyond the happy ending... re-viewing female citizenship within the Mexican telenovela industry.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed September 16, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51257 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9938/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lewkowicz, Eva Helen. “Beyond the happy ending... re-viewing female citizenship within the Mexican telenovela industry.” 2011. Web. 16 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Lewkowicz EH. Beyond the happy ending... re-viewing female citizenship within the Mexican telenovela industry. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 16]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51257 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9938/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Lewkowicz EH. Beyond the happy ending... re-viewing female citizenship within the Mexican telenovela industry. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2011. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/51257 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9938/SOURCE02?view=true

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