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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Lackerstein, Debbie, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Clews, Graham. Churchill and the Phoney War: A Study in Folly and Frustration.

Degree: Humanities & Social Sciences, 2016, University of New South Wales

The Phoney War is a comparatively neglected period in studies of Churchill and war. Yet, this was a time of an extraordinary transformation in Churchill’s fortunes: he returned from almost a decade in the political wilderness to take an active role in the strategic direction of the war and he then went on to become Prime Minister.This study reassesses the nature and significance of Churchill’s contribution to Britain’s war effort during the Phoney War. The issues and events considered are those Churchill believed important and upon which he spent much time and energy but, nevertheless, they are matters that have been inadequately explored, are misunderstood, or remain controversial in the scholarship. There is little here of the public Churchill of the evocative speeches and ‘bull dog’ persona. This is a study of the Churchill the public did not see, the man of the Admiralty war rooms and of staff meetings, of the War Cabinet and its committees, all places in which he developed his priorities for victory.This thesis is in two parts. The first deals with Churchill as First Lord and focuses on his supervision of the anti-U-boat war; his attempts to develop a naval offensive and his view of appropriate naval strategy; and his contribution to the building of the navy he considered necessary to fight his war. The second part addresses Churchill and the wider war; his attempt to animate Britain’s war effort with the government; his pursuit of a more aggressive prosecution of the war; and his contribution to the disastrous Norwegian Campaign of April/May, 1940.The principal conclusion of this thesis is that, for Churchill, the Phoney War was a period of folly and frustration, a time during which he failed in many areas to show himself either a warrior of superior qualities or a potential war leader. His folly was to be found in flawed assumptions, excessive self-confidence, dubious strategy and a penchant for risk; his frustration was driven by the strictures of government, the limitations of the Allied military position and the unique circumstances of the times, but it was also very much a product of his own faults and short-comings. Advisors/Committee Members: Lackerstein, Debbie, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Norwegian Campaign 1940; anti-U-boat warfare 1939-1940; Narvik

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clews, G. (2016). Churchill and the Phoney War: A Study in Folly and Frustration. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/56579 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:41003/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clews, Graham. “Churchill and the Phoney War: A Study in Folly and Frustration.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed November 25, 2020. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/56579 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:41003/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clews, Graham. “Churchill and the Phoney War: A Study in Folly and Frustration.” 2016. Web. 25 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Clews G. Churchill and the Phoney War: A Study in Folly and Frustration. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/56579 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:41003/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Clews G. Churchill and the Phoney War: A Study in Folly and Frustration. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2016. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/56579 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:41003/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Du Toit, Allan. Southern Sentinel: The Anglo-South African Simon's Town Agreements and the Collective Defence of the Cape Sea Route during the Cold War, 1945-1975.

Degree: Humanities & Social Sciences, 2019, University of New South Wales

This study, based on British and South African archival records, much of them previously classified, examines the Anglo-South African partnership for the collective defence of the strategically important sea route round the Cape of Good Hope from 1945 to 1975 during the era of post-war British imperial drawdown, with an increasingly isolated South Africa, defined by its racial policies, taking a strident nationalist and anti-Communist path. It is a study of international naval cooperation, basing and interoperability, and of the related development of the South African Navy, within the context of diplomatic and defence relations between London and Pretoria and as part of broader Commonwealth and Western defence arrangements during the Cold War. The defence of the Cape sea route, which had been vitally important to Britain and the Allied cause during the Second World War, was achieved through the interconnected 1921 Anglo-South African Simon’s Town arrangements and the subsequent Simon’s Town Agreement which superseded them in 1955. These agreements formed a continuum that provided for the safeguarding of the Cape sea route during this period. Despite being the subject of intense political controversy linked to abhorrence of apartheid, presenting successive British Governments with the dilemma of balancing strategic relevance and political liability, there was an overall continuity of strategic themes throughout the period. This was largely because of the fundamental and continued belief by both signatories in the strategic importance of one of the world’s most vital sea routes. Although strategically still relevant, the Agreement was finally terminated in 1975 essentially for political reasons at a time when Britain had finally withdrawn from East of Suez and was refocussing on its NATO commitments, and when South Africa was becoming increasing isolated internationally because of its apartheid policies. The Agreement and the preceding Simon’s Town arrangements nonetheless served the grand strategic and national interests of both nations and the broader Western alliance effectively during the first three decades of the Cold War. Advisors/Committee Members: Lackerstein, Debbie, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW, Hancock, Eleanor, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW, Reeve, Lawrence, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Simonstown Agreement; Simon's Town; Simonstown; Cape Sea Route; South African Navy; South Atlantic Station

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Du Toit, A. (2019). Southern Sentinel: The Anglo-South African Simon's Town Agreements and the Collective Defence of the Cape Sea Route during the Cold War, 1945-1975. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/70050

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Du Toit, Allan. “Southern Sentinel: The Anglo-South African Simon's Town Agreements and the Collective Defence of the Cape Sea Route during the Cold War, 1945-1975.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed November 25, 2020. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/70050.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Du Toit, Allan. “Southern Sentinel: The Anglo-South African Simon's Town Agreements and the Collective Defence of the Cape Sea Route during the Cold War, 1945-1975.” 2019. Web. 25 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Du Toit A. Southern Sentinel: The Anglo-South African Simon's Town Agreements and the Collective Defence of the Cape Sea Route during the Cold War, 1945-1975. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2019. [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/70050.

Council of Science Editors:

Du Toit A. Southern Sentinel: The Anglo-South African Simon's Town Agreements and the Collective Defence of the Cape Sea Route during the Cold War, 1945-1975. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2019. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/70050

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