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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Jalaludin, Bin, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Cashmore, Aaron. Three contemporary public health challenges in New South Wales, Australia: preventing dental caries; scoping workplace violence; and monitoring and controlling pertussis.

Degree: Community Medicine, 2014, University of New South Wales

The Australian state of NSW has a history of public health action which predates Federation and continues to this day. In this thesis, I explore three current public health problems in NSW, each of which disproportionately affects a vulnerable sub-population. Three discrete studies are described, and the impact of these studies on public health knowledge, policy and practice in NSW is explored thoroughly. Dental caries is a common childhood health problem in NSW. In the first study, I used qualitative methods to evaluate a novel program established to stabilise existing, and prevent new, caries in children. I sought the views and experiences of program staff and participating parents, and found that both providers and recipients considered that the program components are appropriate, complementary, well delivered and mostly effective. The findings have several implications for oral health promotion practice. Workplace violence is common among health professionals. However, this public health problem has received little research attention in some health care settings. In the second study, I used quantitative methods to scope workplace violence among correctional health and forensic mental health professionals in NSW. The findings show that workplace violence is common in these health workers, although physical abuse is uncommon when compared with health workers practicing in community settings. I make several recommendations for practice in NSW and future research more broadly. Despite being a vaccine preventable infection, pertussis outbreaks occur periodically in NSW. In the third study, I used time series analysis to investigate the potential of real-time monitoring of cough-related emergency department visits among children to provide early warning of pertussis outbreaks. In children, pertussis appears to be an important, but not the sole, driver of cough-related emergency department visits. The findings have implications for future research and the implementation of syndromic surveillance in NSW. The studies included in this thesis have improved our understanding of three contemporary public health problems in NSW. Also, importantly, each applied study has had a tangible impact on the public health landscape in NSW, with findings leading to organisational change in several health services and modifications to a key public health surveillance system. Advisors/Committee Members: Jalaludin, Bin, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Jackson Pulver, Lisa, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Public Health; New South Wales; Australia; Challenges; Organsiational Change; Outbreaks; Monitoring; Preventing dental caries; Scoping workplace violence; Monitoring and controlling pertussis; Childhood Health; Sub-populations; Vaccine; Prevention; Syndromic Surveillance

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APA (6th Edition):

Cashmore, A. (2014). Three contemporary public health challenges in New South Wales, Australia: preventing dental caries; scoping workplace violence; and monitoring and controlling pertussis. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54073 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12846/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cashmore, Aaron. “Three contemporary public health challenges in New South Wales, Australia: preventing dental caries; scoping workplace violence; and monitoring and controlling pertussis.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54073 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12846/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cashmore, Aaron. “Three contemporary public health challenges in New South Wales, Australia: preventing dental caries; scoping workplace violence; and monitoring and controlling pertussis.” 2014. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Cashmore A. Three contemporary public health challenges in New South Wales, Australia: preventing dental caries; scoping workplace violence; and monitoring and controlling pertussis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54073 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12846/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Cashmore A. Three contemporary public health challenges in New South Wales, Australia: preventing dental caries; scoping workplace violence; and monitoring and controlling pertussis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54073 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12846/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Eastwood, John Graeme. Realist theory building for social epidemiology.

Degree: Public Health & Community Medicine, 2011, University of New South Wales

Background and Aims:It is increasingly recognised that major adult public health issues, related to development,behaviour and lifestyle have their origins during pregnancy, infancy and early childhood.The aim of this study is to utilise mixed methodology to build a conceptual framework,theory and model describing the mechanisms by which multilevel factors influence thedevelopmental and life course outcomes with a focus on perinatal depression.Methodology and Methods:I used a critical realist approach to social epidemiology theory building. Emergentmethods included: key informant interviews, focus groups, thematic analysis, conceptualmapping, situational analysis, factor analysis, logistic, linear, and Bayesian spatial andmultilevel regression studies. Explanatory theory building utilised abductive Inference tothe Best Explanation.Results:Theoretical concepts emerging included: loss of expectation, marginalisation, loss ofcontrol, nurturing and support, social support networks, access to services, ethnicmigration and the role of global economy, business and media. Multilevel spatial studiessuggest that strong ecological social networks increase depression among migrantmothers but not Australian mothers.DiscussionThe study found accumulating evidence that maternal stress, during and after pregnancy,is a cause of maternal depression and altered developmental trajectory of her infant.Emerging was the centrality of expectation lost as a possible trigger of stress anddepression. Global, economic, social and cultural mechanisms were identified thatexplain maternal stress and depression within family and neighbourhood contexts. Thechallenge for policy and practice is to support mothers and their partners during thetransition to parenthood.The ThesisIn the neighbourhood spatial context, in keeping with critical realist ontology, globaleconomic,social and cultural level generative powers trigger and condition maternalpsychological and biological level stress mechanisms resulting in the phenomenon ofmaternal depression and alteration of the infants’ developmental trajectory. Advisors/Committee Members: Jalaludin, Bin, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Kemp, Lynn, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Postnatal Depression; Critical Realism; Social Epidemiology; Mixed Method

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APA (6th Edition):

Eastwood, J. G. (2011). Realist theory building for social epidemiology. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/50896 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9790/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eastwood, John Graeme. “Realist theory building for social epidemiology.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/50896 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9790/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eastwood, John Graeme. “Realist theory building for social epidemiology.” 2011. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Eastwood JG. Realist theory building for social epidemiology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2011. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/50896 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9790/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Eastwood JG. Realist theory building for social epidemiology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2011. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/50896 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9790/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

3. Thomas, Susan. Collaborating to Improve Access to Primary Health Care for Vulnerable Populations.

Degree: Community Medicine, 2012, University of New South Wales

Primary health care (PHC) services in Australia are well placed to provide a range of health services. While most Australians have ready access to these services, more vulnerable groups may experience barriers. This thesis explores barriers and enablers to accessing PHC services for some vulnerable groups including children, Aboriginal people and the elderly and explores strategies to improve access. These five studies, undertaken as part of the NSW Public Health Officer Training Program, provide information useful to public health policy makers, service planners, managers and health workers. The first study develops an evaluation framework for community child health services. The second study demonstrates application of the framework and focuses on how paediatric outreach services in an Aboriginal community in Sydney work in partnership with families, the community and other services. Recommendations were made to formalise collaboration in the planning of care for Aboriginal children. Early intervention for more children with resulting better outcomes is an anticipated benefit of this evaluation. The third study was undertaken in Broken Hill, NSW and investigates the decline in participation at blood lead screening services, particularly by Aboriginal children. Strategies to improve screening rates include better communication between services, better use of public health data and more support for families whose children have elevated blood lead levels. The fourth study examines public health partnerships between government health services and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services at the state and local level, with a focus on communicable disease control. Collaborations between services could be strengthened by the creation of organisational opportunities, strengthening the workforce and further developing cultural awareness. The final study looks at fall-related injuries requiring an ambulance in Sydney in 2008. Falls are the second most common reason for the dispatch of an ambulance and paramedics are well placed to expand their role in assessing fall risk, treating injuries on the scene and referring patients to community based PHC services. Improvements in the collection and linking of ambulance data would allow further analysis of characteristics and outcomes of fall-related injury. This thesis demonstrates how collaboration between services can strengthen access to PHC for some vulnerable populations. Advisors/Committee Members: Jackson Pulver, Lisa, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Jalaludin, Bin, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Seale, Holly, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: public health; primary health care; access; aboriginal health; child health; collaboration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thomas, S. (2012). Collaborating to Improve Access to Primary Health Care for Vulnerable Populations. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52295 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10967/SOURCE01?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thomas, Susan. “Collaborating to Improve Access to Primary Health Care for Vulnerable Populations.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52295 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10967/SOURCE01?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thomas, Susan. “Collaborating to Improve Access to Primary Health Care for Vulnerable Populations.” 2012. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Thomas S. Collaborating to Improve Access to Primary Health Care for Vulnerable Populations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52295 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10967/SOURCE01?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Thomas S. Collaborating to Improve Access to Primary Health Care for Vulnerable Populations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52295 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10967/SOURCE01?view=true

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