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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Hayen, Andrew, University of Technology Sydney"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Robertson, Hamish. The Geography of Alzheimer’s Disease in New South Wales: Using Spatial Science to Investigate Social and Systemic Effects.

Degree: Public Health & Community Medicine, 2017, University of New South Wales

Population ageing is an increasingly global phenomenon. One of its correlates is an increase in the prevalence and incidence of the dementias. However, the geographic distribution of the dementias in Australia at the sub-national level remains a developmental aspect of the current knowledge base. This research addresses that knowledge gap, and several of its systemic implications, by utilising a specifically geographic approach. This includes modelling the projected prevalence of the dementias across the state of New South Wales using official Australian data sources. It also incorporates aged care service provider data to investigate the accessibility of and possible changes in the demand for and supply of such services as population ageing progresses. This is done utilising three methods: (1) modelling the demography and epidemiology of ageing; (2) mapping modelled scenarios in a geographic information systems software environment and; (3) transferring those results to a data visualisation environment for further exploration and analysis.This approach examines the scale and complexity of population ageing by focusing on a selection of issues including: that the composition of the older population will change over time; that the epidemiology of ageing, as evidenced by the dementias, may be equally dynamic; that these issues will express themselves differently at different scales and across different locations; and that the resourcing and potential costing implications of population ageing will unfold differently by geography. The research examines these issues drawing on a health and medical geographical (HMG) perspective to explore population ageing and aged care service provision using the state of New South Wales as a case study. The research shows how population ageing and related systemic factors can be managed by applying spatial strategies. Secondary spatial analyses are conducted including the measurement of spatial access to services at different geographic scales and distances. Emerging patterns are identified at multiple geographic scales and potential changes in service demand calculated accordingly. The additional use of emerging spatial data visualisation methods make this work a timely contribution to population ageing research and planning in Australia. Advisors/Committee Members: Georgiou, Andrew, Macquarie University, Hayen, Andrew, University of Technology Sydney, Heywood, Anita, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Geography; Ageing; Dementia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Robertson, H. (2017). The Geography of Alzheimer’s Disease in New South Wales: Using Spatial Science to Investigate Social and Systemic Effects. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60355

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Robertson, Hamish. “The Geography of Alzheimer’s Disease in New South Wales: Using Spatial Science to Investigate Social and Systemic Effects.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60355.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Robertson, Hamish. “The Geography of Alzheimer’s Disease in New South Wales: Using Spatial Science to Investigate Social and Systemic Effects.” 2017. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Robertson H. The Geography of Alzheimer’s Disease in New South Wales: Using Spatial Science to Investigate Social and Systemic Effects. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2017. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60355.

Council of Science Editors:

Robertson H. The Geography of Alzheimer’s Disease in New South Wales: Using Spatial Science to Investigate Social and Systemic Effects. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2017. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60355


University of New South Wales

2. Clarke, Susan. A mixed methods study of chronic otitis media in Jumla, Nepal.

Degree: Community Medicine, 2017, University of New South Wales

This thesis examines the intersection of chronic ear infections in children and the structural violence of poverty in the mountain district of Jumla, Nepal. Chronic suppurative otitis media is associated with malnutrition, overcrowding, lack of access to sanitation, clean water, education and healthcare. Jumla has food insecurity, limited healthcare and hard working women, so was an ideal location to explore this complicated disease of poverty. My overarching aim was to increase the knowledge that may contribute to improving the ear health of the children of Jumla, which required understanding the cultural context, the functioning of local health services and the larger social structures maintaining the disadvantage suffered by Jumli people.In interviews with women I found that their lived experience defied the stereotype of the illiterate, powerless, rural Nepali woman – they were pragmatic, participated in family decision-making and embraced change. I developed a hypothesis that a participatory intervention in existing women’s groups could improve their knowledge, attitude and practice for ear health and reduce the prevalence of chronic ear infections in their children.Therefore, I conducted a cluster randomised trial which included baseline village ear clinics for 937 children and surveys of 508 of their mothers. I adapted the WHO Hearing and Ear Care Primary Training and delivered it in half of the women’s groups. At 12 month follow-up there was no difference in the women’s questionnaire score or the prevalence of chronic suppurative otitis media in their children, between control and intervention groups. However, in the combined control and intervention groups, there was a significant reduction in the prevalence of chronic suppurative otitis media from baseline 11.3% to follow-up 7.1%.In this study, health promotion to women did not reduce the prevalence of chronic suppurative otitis media in their children, since the main problem was the circumstances of their lives. My offering good quality free village clinics, raising awareness among health workers and stocking health posts may have contributed to improved ear health of the children. Chronic ear infections are a complex condition requiring a multifaceted response which should address not only health system inadequacies but the underlying structural violence of poverty. Advisors/Committee Members: Richmond, Robyn, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Worth, Heather, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Hayen, Andrew, University of Technology Sydney.

Subjects/Keywords: Global health; Otits media; Nepal; Structural violence

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clarke, S. (2017). A mixed methods study of chronic otitis media in Jumla, Nepal. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60232 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:51272/SOURCE2?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clarke, Susan. “A mixed methods study of chronic otitis media in Jumla, Nepal.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60232 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:51272/SOURCE2?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clarke, Susan. “A mixed methods study of chronic otitis media in Jumla, Nepal.” 2017. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Clarke S. A mixed methods study of chronic otitis media in Jumla, Nepal. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2017. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60232 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:51272/SOURCE2?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Clarke S. A mixed methods study of chronic otitis media in Jumla, Nepal. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2017. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60232 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:51272/SOURCE2?view=true


University of New South Wales

3. Saha, Amit. Improved intervention strategies with oral cholera vaccine in an endemic setting.

Degree: Public Health & Community Medicine, 2018, University of New South Wales

Cholera is the most common dehydrating diarrhoeal disease in low and middle income countries (LMICs). In Bangladesh the disease is endemic, causing a substantial burden of morbidity and mortality. Oral cholera vaccines (OCVs) have been developed and improved over the last three decades as a protective tool to control cholera. The World Health Organization recommends the use of OCVs in humanitarian emergencies as well as in epidemic and endemic settings. However, OCV effectiveness has been shown to vary by setting, which suggests that the identification of the drivers of effectiveness is important when planning for strategic use of the vaccine in each setting. This thesis aims to extend our insight on cholera vaccination and the drivers of vaccine effectiveness, which could be useful in improving vaccination strategies in LMICs where cholera is often endemic. The thesis is a series of published peer-reviewed articles that include (i) improved approaches to vaccine delivery (ii) effectiveness of OCV stored at elevated temperatures (iii) risk factors for cholera in different disease transmission settings; and (iv) predictors of OCV uptake in a mass vaccination campaign. In the first paper, there is discussion about cholera disease, different approaches of OCV implementation in endemic and epidemic situations, the role of herd immunity and factors affecting immunogenicity and the effectiveness of vaccine. The second paper demonstrates the safety, immunogenicity and thermostability of OCVs; keeping the vaccine at a higher temperature (up to 42°C) than the recommended stringent cold chain (2-8°C). The third paper assesses socioeconomic factors of risk for cholera in vaccinated and non-vaccinated communities to understand whether the risk differs by the disease transmission pattern. The fourth paper describes the experience of using a geographic information system (GIS) in the planning and delivery of OCVs in a clinical trial and identifies socioeconomic predictors which influence vaccine uptake in a low socioeconomic community in Bangladesh.These studies provide evidence which will assist strategic implementation of cholera vaccination program in endemic settings. The findings of this thesis will inform policy makers to plan intervention strategies using OCV to reduce the burden of cholera with affordable vaccines globally. Advisors/Committee Members: Hayen, Andrew, University of Technology, Sydney, Rosewell, Alexander, Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, MacIntyre, C.Raina, Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Qadri, Firdausi, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research Bangladesh (icddr,b).

Subjects/Keywords: Vaccine effectiveness; Oral Cholera Vaccine (OCV); Vaccination program; Vaccine uptake; Thermal stability; Socio-economic drivers; Geographic information system

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Saha, A. (2018). Improved intervention strategies with oral cholera vaccine in an endemic setting. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60029 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:51522/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Saha, Amit. “Improved intervention strategies with oral cholera vaccine in an endemic setting.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60029 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:51522/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Saha, Amit. “Improved intervention strategies with oral cholera vaccine in an endemic setting.” 2018. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Saha A. Improved intervention strategies with oral cholera vaccine in an endemic setting. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2018. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60029 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:51522/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Saha A. Improved intervention strategies with oral cholera vaccine in an endemic setting. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2018. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/60029 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:51522/SOURCE02?view=true

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