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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Hayen, Andrew, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Paul, Repon. Population-based estimates of hepatitis E virus associated mortality in Bangladesh.

Degree: Community Medicine, 2019, University of New South Wales

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a significant public health problem in many resource-poor countries. China has produced and licensed an effective HEV vaccine, but there are limited population-based data on HEV-associated mortality to make informed decisions about introducing the vaccine. The overarching aim of the research in this thesis was to estimate the population-based rate of HEV-associated mortality in Bangladesh.To address this aim, we set up acute jaundice surveillance in six hospitals to estimate the prevalence of HEV infection among patients admitted with acute jaundice. We conducted a mortality survey in the hospitals’ catchment areas to identify deaths associated with acute jaundice. In the rural communities, we applied a novel survey method to identify jaundice-associated deaths and estimated the method’s sensitivity and cost-savings compared to the established house-to-house survey method. The population-based estimates of HEV-specific mortality were then estimated by combining the hospital data with the mortality survey. In the six study hospitals, the prevalence of acute HEV was 34% among patients aged ≥14 years admitted with acute jaundice. The case fatality rate of all acute HEV patients was 5%, but was 12% in pregnancy. The sensitivity of the community knowledge method in identifying maternal deaths was 100% and jaundice-associated deaths aged ≥14 years was 97%. The community knowledge approach required 36% of the staff time to undertake compared to the house-to-house survey. In the hospitals’ catchment area (population of 2.3 million), we identified 612 acute jaundice deaths aged ≥14 years, including 25 maternal deaths. HEV-associated mortality was 0.9 (95% CI: 0.7-1.9) per 100,000 population aged ≥14 years; the maternal mortality ratio associated with HEV was 4.7 (95% CI: 0.7-13.0) per 100,000 live births; the HEV-associated stillbirth rate was 8.1 (95% CI: 3.3-14.8), and the neonatal mortality rate was 22.5 (95% CI: 8.5-39.4) per 100,000 live births.This study provided a robust estimate of HEV-associated mortality in Bangladesh which can be used to determine the cost-effectiveness of HEV vaccination and other control measures to help prioritise public health interventions. The low-cost survey method could be a valuable tool for estimating the population-based burden of hepatitis in low-and middle-income countries. Advisors/Committee Members: Gidding, Heather, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Hayen, Andrew, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Mortality; Hepatitis E virus; Surveillance; Population-based estimates; Bangladesh

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Paul, R. (2019). Population-based estimates of hepatitis E virus associated mortality in Bangladesh. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/63769 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:60958/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Paul, Repon. “Population-based estimates of hepatitis E virus associated mortality in Bangladesh.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/63769 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:60958/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Paul, Repon. “Population-based estimates of hepatitis E virus associated mortality in Bangladesh.” 2019. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Paul R. Population-based estimates of hepatitis E virus associated mortality in Bangladesh. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/63769 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:60958/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Paul R. Population-based estimates of hepatitis E virus associated mortality in Bangladesh. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2019. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/63769 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:60958/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Nahidi, Shizar. Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia.

Degree: Community Medicine, 2014, University of New South Wales

This research aimed to determine the level of psychological distress and attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help in Iranian international students at UNSW Australia, and to compare these with results reported in other university student samples. The study also explored the factors associated with increased levels of psychological distress and positive attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help in this sample.A preliminary qualitative exploration provided information about major stressors and coping strategies among Iranian international students at UNSW. The main study involved a cross-sectional e-mail survey of 180 Iranian international students pursuing academic degrees during 2012/2013 at this university. The self-administered questionnaire included demographic and personal items, and five standardised scales: World Health Organisation Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL—BREF), Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, Attitudes towards Seeking Professional Psychological Help Scale—Short Form, Multidimensional Scale for Perceived Social Support, and Duke Religion Index. Logistic and linear regression analyses were used to analyse the predictors of psychological distress and attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help, respectively.Compared to a sample of university students in Australia, a significantly smaller proportion of Iranian international students experienced moderate or severe psychological distress. However, their distress levels were unexceptional when located within a range of similar studies of university students. Iranian international students did not differ from a sample of Australian university students in their attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help. Their attitudes were unexceptional when located among other studies of university students. When different psycho-social and socio-demographic factors were considered together, experiencing high to very high levels of psychological distress was associated with being female (OR=3.92, p=0.004), worse physical health (OR=0.50, p<0.001), negative attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help (OR=0.91, p=0.022), lower levels of perceived social support (OR=0.96, p=0.016), and lower levels of religious involvement and spirituality (OR=0.91, p=0.006). Positive attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help were associated with higher scores on the environment domain of WHOQOL—BREF (B=0.62, p=0.001) and having previous experience with psychological counselling (B=4.22, p<0.001). Findings from this growing group of international university students can be used to support more culturally competent mental health promotion and service provision. Advisors/Committee Members: Blignault, Ilse, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Razee, Husna, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Hayen, Andrew, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Iran; Mental Health; Psychological Distress; Australia; Tertiary Education; International Students; Psychological Help-Seeking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nahidi, S. (2014). Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54468 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35021/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nahidi, Shizar. “Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54468 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35021/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nahidi, Shizar. “Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia.” 2014. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Nahidi S. Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54468 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35021/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Nahidi S. Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54468 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35021/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

3. Woolfenden, Susan. Inequity in developmental vulnerability, its determinants and the role of access to early identification and intervention.

Degree: Public Health & Community Medicine, 2015, University of New South Wales

ABSTRACTBACKGROUND AND AIMSChildren who are developmentally vulnerable are those that have significant problems in at least one area of their development. Limited information is available on the prevalence of developmental vulnerability prior to the start of school, whether it has an inequitable distribution and how children are identified and referred to early intervention. This thesis aimed to:1. Explore challenges in investigating inequity in developmental vulnerability. 2. Assess inequities in the prevalence of developmental vulnerability, associated risk factors and their interactions. 3. Explore factors that influence access to early identification and intervention. METHODSMethods included: a literature review; a theoretical critique; a systematic review of the prevalence of parental concerns on the Parents’ Evaluation of Developmental Status (PEDS) indicating developmental vulnerability and associated risk factors; a prospective birth cohort investigating developmental vulnerability and its early identification; a qualitative study of access to early identification and intervention; and a survey of primary health practitioners.RESULTSBetween a quarter to a third of children were developmentally vulnerable as indicated by parental concerns on the PEDS in the systematic review and the original research of this thesis. There was evidence of inequities in developmental vulnerability associated with socioeconomic disadvantage, and culturally and linguistically diverse background (CALD). Children with multiple risk factors at the child, parent, family and neighbourhood level were more likely to be developmentally vulnerable but were less likely to have the PEDS documented at well child checks. Parents from CALD backgrounds, health and early childhood practitioners described barriers to access and quality in early identification and intervention services. CONCLUSIONTo reduce inequities in developmental vulnerability, differential risk needs to be addressed through early childhood policy that ensures cumulative buffering through universal early interventions with enhanced support for vulnerable populations. Differential knowledge needs to be addressed by ensuring that early childhood development is “everyone’s business”. Differential quality needs to be addressed through training and monitoring of primary health care systems to ensure consistency of practice. Differential access needs to be addressed through integrating primary health and early childhood services. Advisors/Committee Members: Hayen, Andrew, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Eapen, Valsamma, Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Williams, Katrina, Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Australia Developmental Medicine, Royal Children’s Hospital, Australia Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Australia, Kemp, Lynn, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Western Sydney, Australia.

Subjects/Keywords: Health inequity; Developmental vulnerability; Child; Health care inequity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Woolfenden, S. (2015). Inequity in developmental vulnerability, its determinants and the role of access to early identification and intervention. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55694 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:38564/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Woolfenden, Susan. “Inequity in developmental vulnerability, its determinants and the role of access to early identification and intervention.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55694 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:38564/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Woolfenden, Susan. “Inequity in developmental vulnerability, its determinants and the role of access to early identification and intervention.” 2015. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Woolfenden S. Inequity in developmental vulnerability, its determinants and the role of access to early identification and intervention. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55694 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:38564/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Woolfenden S. Inequity in developmental vulnerability, its determinants and the role of access to early identification and intervention. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2015. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55694 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:38564/SOURCE02?view=true

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