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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Dennis, Peter, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Lee, Roger. British Battle Planning in 1916 and the Battle of Fromelles: a Case Study of an Evolving Skill.

Degree: Humanities & Social Sciences, 2013, University of New South Wales

Bad planning has become a standard explanation in the historiography of World War Ifor poor British battlefield performance. Often, poor planning is explicitly charged with being the cause of high casualties and tactical defeats. Rarely though are the failures of the plan identified in detail or with precision and even more rarely do the critics place the alleged failure of the plan into the context of what the plan was, what the limitations on the planners were and why elements of the plan allegedly failed.This thesis examines the process by which a military plan was developed and implemented by the British Expeditionary Force on the Western Front in 1916. A battle plan was nothing more than a blueprint for bringing together at the right time and in the right place all the combat elements needed in order to give the attacking infantry the greatest chance of success. British battle planning had no doctrine and no Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) to guide it. At each level of headquarters, planning was driven by different perspectives and requirements, factors seldom exposed in analyses of why battles unfolded the way they did. This study examines the battle planning process vertically, in that it follows the progress of a battle plan from its inception in the strategic designs of the supreme commander down through the various intermediate level commands at operational and tactical headquarters until it becomes the orders that sent the infantry forward into the attack. It does so by analysing the following in the context of a case study of the Battle of Fromelles, 19 July 1916:- Composition and nature of the specialist planning staff;- The strategic level concept and its strategic context;- The operational level plan in the context of the Somme campaign;- The higher or grand tactical plan at the Corps headquarters;- Conversion of the grand tactical plan into a Divisional plan; and- The detail of the Brigade plan to guide the attack.The Battle of Fromelles provided the structure of the study as its small scale enabled the process of the evolution of the plan to be followed, the factors that influenced and occasionally changed the intention or the explicit orders from superior headquarters to be identified and the clear separation of the original intentions and objectives from the eventualoutcomes. Advisors/Committee Members: Grey, Jeffrey, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW, Dennis, Peter, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: British battle planning; Battle planning 1916; World War One planning; Fromelles; Command and control; Battle staff system

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lee, R. (2013). British Battle Planning in 1916 and the Battle of Fromelles: a Case Study of an Evolving Skill. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53030 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11708/SOURCE01?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee, Roger. “British Battle Planning in 1916 and the Battle of Fromelles: a Case Study of an Evolving Skill.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53030 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11708/SOURCE01?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee, Roger. “British Battle Planning in 1916 and the Battle of Fromelles: a Case Study of an Evolving Skill.” 2013. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lee R. British Battle Planning in 1916 and the Battle of Fromelles: a Case Study of an Evolving Skill. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53030 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11708/SOURCE01?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Lee R. British Battle Planning in 1916 and the Battle of Fromelles: a Case Study of an Evolving Skill. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2013. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53030 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11708/SOURCE01?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. O'Neill, Mark. Second-party Counterinsurgency.

Degree: Humanities & Social Sciences, 2013, University of New South Wales

This dissertation examines the theory and conduct of counterinsurgency operations by interventionist states, defined and labelled herein as second-party counterinsurgency. The conduct of such second-party counterinsurgency has been (and is) commonplace in the contemporary era, yet a large proportion of extant counterinsurgency theory and practice – indeed much of the commonly accepted counterinsurgency paradigm – fails to meet the challenge of its subject adequately. In line with this assertion, contemporary Western counterinsurgency practice has all too often defaulted to a formulaic approach, characterised by an overly simplistic ‘hearts and minds’ archetype. This model has held the imagination of counterinsurgency theory and scholarship since the early 1960s. It is a basic argument of this dissertation that blind acceptance of the ‘hearts and minds’ paradigm has often led second-party counterinsurgents to adopt of inappropriate ways and means to attain their strategic objectives. This increases the risk of defeat in what is already a complex and difficult enterprise. The most important original contribution made by this study is to identify the need for, and propose, a suitable alternative framework for the conduct of second-party counterinsurgency. The central hypothesis is that the principles of counter violence, counter organisation, counter subversion and pre-emption, supported by the enabling concepts of intelligence and adaptation, provide a new and more appropriate theoretical framework to inform the successful conduct of second-party counterinsurgency. Central to the proposed framework is a method that seeks to focus and capitalise on the relative ubiquity of insurgent ways in order to create a defeat mechanism that invokes Clausewitz’s rational calculus. The research underpinning this study derives from a literature review and analysis of archival, primary and secondary source material, the conduct of personal interviews, the use of research questionnaires with select personnel, and the establishment and verification of the framework using three critical historical case studies. The key conclusion of this thesis is that strong correlation appears to exist between the dependent variables of the proposed second-party counterinsurgency framework and successful counterinsurgency operations. Advisors/Committee Members: Stockings, Craig, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW, Dennis, Peter, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: South West Africa; Counterinsurgency; Strategy; Dhofar; Iraq

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

O'Neill, M. (2013). Second-party Counterinsurgency. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53039 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11717/SOURCE01?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

O'Neill, Mark. “Second-party Counterinsurgency.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53039 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11717/SOURCE01?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

O'Neill, Mark. “Second-party Counterinsurgency.” 2013. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

O'Neill M. Second-party Counterinsurgency. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53039 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11717/SOURCE01?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

O'Neill M. Second-party Counterinsurgency. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2013. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53039 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:11717/SOURCE01?view=true


University of New South Wales

3. Brown, Ashleigh. Lions led by donkeys? Brigade commanders of the Australian Imperial Force, 1914-1918.

Degree: Humanities & Social Sciences, 2017, University of New South Wales

Australian First World War historiography tends to focus on the ordinary soldier: his background, character and involvement in the war. This is a legacy left by Charles Bean who, following the history from below approach, believed in the need for soldiers’ stories to be told. On the other end of the spectrum, attention is given to political leaders and the British high command. British commanders and, by extension, other Allied commanders are too often portrayed as poor leaders who were reluctant to adapt to modern warfare, and did not demonstrate a sense of responsibility for the men under their command. The evidence shows that this perception is not accurate. A comprehensive understanding of the progression of Australian forces on the Western Front cannot be gained without investigating the progression of those in command.This thesis examines the brigade commanders of the Australian Imperial Force who held that level of command for a substantial period while on the Western Front. These commanders challenge preconceived notions of First World War commanders, as they continually developed tactics and adapted to modern warfare as it evolved. They embraced new technology and ensured that their formations were able to effectively work with it. As the war progressed, they gained an appreciation of the importance of collaborating with other formations and ensuring effective communication, and demonstrated an understanding of the challenges of war on the Western Front. By 1918, the brigade commanders were effective leaders who undoubtedly played a significant role in the success of the Australian forces. Advisors/Committee Members: Dennis, Peter, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW, Grey, Jeffrey, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW, Blaazer, David, Humanities & Social Sciences, UNSW Canberra, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: AIF; brigade; commanders; lions; donkeys

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brown, A. (2017). Lions led by donkeys? Brigade commanders of the Australian Imperial Force, 1914-1918. (Masters Thesis). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59010 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:48271/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, Ashleigh. “Lions led by donkeys? Brigade commanders of the Australian Imperial Force, 1914-1918.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 17, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59010 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:48271/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, Ashleigh. “Lions led by donkeys? Brigade commanders of the Australian Imperial Force, 1914-1918.” 2017. Web. 17 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Brown A. Lions led by donkeys? Brigade commanders of the Australian Imperial Force, 1914-1918. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 17]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59010 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:48271/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Brown A. Lions led by donkeys? Brigade commanders of the Australian Imperial Force, 1914-1918. [Masters Thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2017. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59010 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:48271/SOURCE02?view=true

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