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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Blignault, Ilse, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Ramke, Jacqueline. Equity and blindness: closing the evidence gap in support of universal eye health.

Degree: Social Sciences, 2015, University of New South Wales

BackgroundUniversal Health Coverage is a priority of the World Health Organization (WHO); this is echoed in the 2013 WHO eye health action plan which focuses on Universal Eye Health (UEH). Blindness is unequally distributed between and within countries, being more prevalent in poorer countries and, in all countries, among disadvantaged or marginalised population groups. Interventions exist to treat the most common conditions associated with blindness, including cataract. However, who receives these interventions is socially determined, with services being more available in rich countries than poor ones, and to those who are socially advantaged within populations.MethodsFour studies were undertaken; all analysed secondary data and focused on low and middle income countries. The first was a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between gender and blindness, using population-based studies undertaken since 1980. The second explored inequalities in i) cataract blindness; and ii) blindness for women and men; between 21 geopolitical regions, and how these changed between 1990 and 2010. The third study utilised data from national surveys in Nigeria and Pakistan to examine inequality in cataract blindness and services in relation to gender, literacy status, marital status and place of residence. The final study examined inequality in vision status in Pakistan using hierarchical socioeconomic variables to calculate concentration indices as well as the slope and relative indices of inequality.Results and ConclusionThe studies revealed that prevalence of blindness remains higher in women compared to men, and the relative gender gap widened in some regions of the world between 1990 and 2010. Over this period a number of regions also became relatively worse-off compared to the best-off region. The disadvantaged subgroups experienced higher prevalence of cataract blindness, lower cataract surgical coverage (CSC) and worse surgical outcomes (CSO). The cumulative effects of multiple disadvantage were evident, with cataract blindness, CSC and CSO being consistently worst for groups who were disadvantaged across a number of social dimensions.More nuanced and layered analyses of inequality, including simultaneously reflecting multiple axes of disadvantage, are an essential part of the evidence required in the pursuit of universal eye health. Advisors/Committee Members: Zwi, Anthony, Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences, UNSW, Blignault, Ilse, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Blindness; Universal eye health; Health equity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ramke, J. (2015). Equity and blindness: closing the evidence gap in support of universal eye health. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55121 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:36558/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ramke, Jacqueline. “Equity and blindness: closing the evidence gap in support of universal eye health.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55121 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:36558/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ramke, Jacqueline. “Equity and blindness: closing the evidence gap in support of universal eye health.” 2015. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Ramke J. Equity and blindness: closing the evidence gap in support of universal eye health. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55121 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:36558/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Ramke J. Equity and blindness: closing the evidence gap in support of universal eye health. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2015. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/55121 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:36558/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Nahidi, Shizar. Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia.

Degree: Community Medicine, 2014, University of New South Wales

This research aimed to determine the level of psychological distress and attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help in Iranian international students at UNSW Australia, and to compare these with results reported in other university student samples. The study also explored the factors associated with increased levels of psychological distress and positive attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help in this sample.A preliminary qualitative exploration provided information about major stressors and coping strategies among Iranian international students at UNSW. The main study involved a cross-sectional e-mail survey of 180 Iranian international students pursuing academic degrees during 2012/2013 at this university. The self-administered questionnaire included demographic and personal items, and five standardised scales: World Health Organisation Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL—BREF), Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, Attitudes towards Seeking Professional Psychological Help Scale—Short Form, Multidimensional Scale for Perceived Social Support, and Duke Religion Index. Logistic and linear regression analyses were used to analyse the predictors of psychological distress and attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help, respectively.Compared to a sample of university students in Australia, a significantly smaller proportion of Iranian international students experienced moderate or severe psychological distress. However, their distress levels were unexceptional when located within a range of similar studies of university students. Iranian international students did not differ from a sample of Australian university students in their attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help. Their attitudes were unexceptional when located among other studies of university students. When different psycho-social and socio-demographic factors were considered together, experiencing high to very high levels of psychological distress was associated with being female (OR=3.92, p=0.004), worse physical health (OR=0.50, p<0.001), negative attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help (OR=0.91, p=0.022), lower levels of perceived social support (OR=0.96, p=0.016), and lower levels of religious involvement and spirituality (OR=0.91, p=0.006). Positive attitudes towards seeking professional psychological help were associated with higher scores on the environment domain of WHOQOL—BREF (B=0.62, p=0.001) and having previous experience with psychological counselling (B=4.22, p<0.001). Findings from this growing group of international university students can be used to support more culturally competent mental health promotion and service provision. Advisors/Committee Members: Blignault, Ilse, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Razee, Husna, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Hayen, Andrew, Public Health & Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Iran; Mental Health; Psychological Distress; Australia; Tertiary Education; International Students; Psychological Help-Seeking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nahidi, S. (2014). Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54468 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35021/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nahidi, Shizar. “Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 18, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54468 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35021/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nahidi, Shizar. “Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia.” 2014. Web. 18 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Nahidi S. Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 18]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54468 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35021/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Nahidi S. Mental Health and Psychological Help-Seeking of Iranian International Students at UNSW Australia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/54468 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:35021/SOURCE02?view=true

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