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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Barnier, Amanda, Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Science, Macquarie University"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Hung, Lynette Faye. An analysis of hypnotic reading disruptions.

Degree: Psychology, 2008, University of New South Wales

This thesis investigated hypnotic reading disruptions to identify parameters of hypnosis that may influence reading and to inform the broader issue of whether hypnotic suggestions impact phenomenal experience versus perceptual-cognitive processing. Chapter 1 reviews the relevant literature and identifies core issues addressed by this program. Chapter 2 presents two experiments and two case studies, which focused on establishing a paradigm for investigating hypnotic reading disruptions; in particular, modulation of the Stroop effect. Findings indicated that disruptions of reading experience and/or reading processing may be influenced by the complexity of the suggestion and the natural response strategies of individuals. Chapter 3 presents two experiments that examined the influence of test time and test demands, and explored the experiential factors underlying response to different suggestions. Findings indicated that both hypnotic and posthypnotic suggestions produced disruptions of reading experience but not reading processing. Also, individualsÂ’ experiences and cognitive strategies varied depending on the suggestion they received. Chapter 4 presents two experiments that compared the impact of three suggestions on reading experience and reading processing. Findings indicated that highs were more likely to achieve disruptions of reading experience in response to a suggestion compatible with their natural strategies. Notably, some highs altered their reading processing and hypnotically modulated Stroop interference. Other highs and lows modified their reading processing, but independent of hypnosis, hypnotisability and a suggestion. Chapter 5 presents one experiment that examined the time course of hypnotic reading disruptions and the influence of test context. Findings indicated that highs could maintain disruptions of reading experience over time. They also modified their reading processing independent of hypnosis and a suggestion. Chapter 6 presents one experiment that examined implicit perception, and the impact of hypnosis and hypnotisability. Findings indicated that highs were influenced by information from reading processing despite their experiences of disrupted reading. Chapter 7 interprets the findings of this program within a proposed model of hypnotic disruptions of reading and Stroop performance. This model differentiates between the mechanisms that may underlie reading experiences, the mechanisms that may underlie reading processing and their interaction, and highlights the value of hypnotic models of cognitive processes. Advisors/Committee Members: Barnier, Amanda, Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Science, Macquarie University.

Subjects/Keywords: Stroop; Hypnosis; Reading

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hung, L. F. (2008). An analysis of hypnotic reading disruptions. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/42613 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:4378/SOURCE1?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hung, Lynette Faye. “An analysis of hypnotic reading disruptions.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/42613 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:4378/SOURCE1?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hung, Lynette Faye. “An analysis of hypnotic reading disruptions.” 2008. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Hung LF. An analysis of hypnotic reading disruptions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/42613 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:4378/SOURCE1?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Hung LF. An analysis of hypnotic reading disruptions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2008. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/42613 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:4378/SOURCE1?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Maccallum, Fiona Louise. Autobiographical memory in complicated grief.

Degree: Psychology, 2008, University of New South Wales

Complicated Grief (CG) has been identified as a potential consequence of bereavement that is associated with unique and debilitating outcomes. This thesis investigated autobiographical memory in CG. This program of research focused on the specificity and content of autobiographical memories in the context of CG. Study 1 investigated memory retrieval specificity using a cue word paradigm. Bereaved individuals with CG displayed an overgeneral retrieval style (OGM) compared to bereaved individuals without CG. Study 2 found that CG participants were also less specific in imagining future events in response to positive cues. Further, there was a significant independent relationship between memory retrieval specificity and the specificity of future imaginings. Study 3 investigated the relationship between overgeneral memory and social problem solving. CG participants performed more poorly on this task; however, there was no independent relationship with memory retrieval style. Study 4 investigated the impact of treatment on OGM. Results indicated that as symptoms of CG reduced following treatment, individuals retrieved more specific memories to positive cues. Studies 5-7 examined proposed relationships between self construct and autobiographical remembering in CG, as outlined in Conway and Pleydell-Pearce's (2000) self memory system model. In Study 5, individuals with CG were more likely than bereaved controls to view their self-identity as being related to the deceased. Study 6 investigated the relationship between self-discrepancy, personal goals and memory content. CG individuals were more likely to recall loss-related memories, and there was a relationship between personal goals and memory content. Study 7 extended examination of these factors to future-related thinking. Finally, the program recognised the importance of investigating the impact of the cognitive strategies that individuals may adopt to manage painful memories. Using an experimental Stroop procedure as a measure of thought accessibility, Study 8 investigated thought suppression in CG. The results suggested that CG individuals experienced greater interference from death-related cues. In summary, these studies highlighted some of the key memory processes that may be involved in the maintenance, and potentially the resolution, of CG. Advisors/Committee Members: Bryant, Richard, Psychology, Faculty of Science, UNSW, Barnier, Amanda, Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Science, Macquarie University.

Subjects/Keywords: self; autobiographical memory; complicated grief

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Maccallum, F. L. (2008). Autobiographical memory in complicated grief. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/43510 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:6/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Maccallum, Fiona Louise. “Autobiographical memory in complicated grief.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/43510 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:6/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Maccallum, Fiona Louise. “Autobiographical memory in complicated grief.” 2008. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Maccallum FL. Autobiographical memory in complicated grief. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/43510 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:6/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Maccallum FL. Autobiographical memory in complicated grief. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2008. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/43510 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:6/SOURCE02?view=true

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