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You searched for +publisher:"University of New South Wales" +contributor:("Bain, Mike, Computer Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, UNSW"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Akand, Elma Hussanna. Ontology applications in systems biology: a machine learning approach.

Degree: Computer Science & Engineering, 2014, University of New South Wales

Biology is flooded with an overwhelming accumulation of data and biologists require methods to apply their knowledge to explain biological networks of interacting genes or proteins in comprehensible terms. Therefore the focus of modern bioinformatics has shifted towards systems-wide analysis to understand mechanisms such as those underlying important diseases. Knowledge acquisition from such exponentially growing, inherently noisy and unstructured data is only likely to be achieved by combining bioinformatics, machine learning and semantic technologies such as ontologies. The major contribution of this thesis is on novel ontology applications to integrate complex multi-relational data towards learning models of biological systems. First we examined machine learning using ontology annotations to integrate heterogeneous data on systems biology. A series of propositional learning tasks to learn predictive models of intra-cellular expression in cells showed that feature construction and selection improved performance. Learning to predict phenotype is harder than predicting protein or gene expression, since identifying systems responses requires the integration of multiple potential causes and effects. In this thesis we applied Formal Concept Analysis (FCA) to integrate multiple experiments and identify common subsets of genes that share common systemic behaviour. Visual analytics was then applied to enable users to navigate concept lattices and generate training sets for further analysis by Inductive Logic Programming (ILP). This showed learned rules with biological background knowledge contained potentially interesting relations when validated. However, these rules are not always verifiable by humans. To address this issue a novel method called “visual closure", by analogy to the closure of formal concepts, was implemented. Rules, viewed as concepts, can be expanded by conversion to Datalog queries which then are used to search for additional knowledge in biological databases. The visual closure technique is then applied to complete these expanded concepts for visualization by domain specialists. This thesis has demonstrated novel ontology applications in systems biology. However, the question of how to acquire ontologies remains. Ontologies in systems biology often require relational representations due to the importance of network structures. Therefore, as our final step, an initial version of automated ontology construction in a first order representation is demonstrated. Advisors/Committee Members: Bain, Mike, Computer Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Bioinformatics; Ontology; Machine learning; Formal concept analysis; Systems biology; Propositional learning; Concept lattice; Visual analytics; First order ontology learning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Akand, E. H. (2014). Ontology applications in systems biology: a machine learning approach. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53749 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12444/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Akand, Elma Hussanna. “Ontology applications in systems biology: a machine learning approach.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53749 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12444/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Akand, Elma Hussanna. “Ontology applications in systems biology: a machine learning approach.” 2014. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Akand EH. Ontology applications in systems biology: a machine learning approach. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53749 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12444/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Akand EH. Ontology applications in systems biology: a machine learning approach. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2014. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/53749 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:12444/SOURCE02?view=true


University of New South Wales

2. Ben-Naim, Dror. A software architecture that promotes pedagogical ownership in intelligent tutoring systems.

Degree: Computer Science & Engineering, 2010, University of New South Wales

Although Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) have been the subject of research and development over the past three decades and have been shown many times to produce exceptional results, they have only negligibly impacted mainstream higher education. This thesis argues that in order to drive ITS technology into the mainstream its paradigm should shift from being researcher-centric to teacher-centric. Such a shift in focus raises the question - what is the role of teachers in using ITS technology? In order to answer this question, a conceptual framework is developed, called pedagogical ownership, and a case is made that when teachers can pedagogically own ITS content, they are more likely to adopt it and use it.The thesis proceeds to develop a design paradigm for a specific type of intelligent tutoring system called Adaptive Tutorials. This paradigm, called Virtual Apparatus Framework (VAF), is developed with the motivation to promote teachers' pedagogical ownership over adaptive tutorials. This pedagogically principled requirement leads to concrete software architectural implications, which are explored and discussed. The Adaptive eLearning Platform (AeLP) - a software implementation of VAF which supports the life-cycle of adaptive tutorials - is described. It has been used to develop a set of adaptive tutorials in a variety of disciplines.The important question of methodology for evaluation is itself a subject of inquiry for this thesis. There are no established methodologies for evaluating the degree to which ITS authoring tools and development paradigms support teachers. The thesis puts forward the case for using pedagogical ownership as a key criterion for evaluation of ITS authoring tools. The degree to which VAF and the AeLP promote teacher's pedagogical ownership of adaptive tutorials is then evaluated in several case studies. Each case study features a detailed discussion of the development process in VAF, focusing on the teacher's role, and an analysis, based on evidence and interviews, of the characteristics of VAF that contributed towards the teacher's sense of pedagogical ownership.Refocusing on the teacher's role as pedagogical owner of ITS content provides a new way of approaching key research questions in the field of ITS architecture and authoring tools. Advisors/Committee Members: Marcus, Nadine, Computer Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, UNSW, Bain, Mike, Computer Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: Adaptive eLearning; Intelligent Tutoring Systems; Pedagogical Ownership; Adaptive Tutorials; Educational Data Mining

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ben-Naim, D. (2010). A software architecture that promotes pedagogical ownership in intelligent tutoring systems. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/50338 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9219/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ben-Naim, Dror. “A software architecture that promotes pedagogical ownership in intelligent tutoring systems.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/50338 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9219/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ben-Naim, Dror. “A software architecture that promotes pedagogical ownership in intelligent tutoring systems.” 2010. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Ben-Naim D. A software architecture that promotes pedagogical ownership in intelligent tutoring systems. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2010. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/50338 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9219/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Ben-Naim D. A software architecture that promotes pedagogical ownership in intelligent tutoring systems. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2010. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/50338 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:9219/SOURCE02?view=true

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