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You searched for +publisher:"University of New Orleans" +contributor:("Falzarano, Jeffrey"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New Orleans

1. Zhou, Zhengquan. A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water.

Degree: PhD, Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, 2003, University of New Orleans

A planing catamaran is a high-powered, twin-hull water craft that develops the lift which supports its weight, primarily through hydrodynamic water pressure. Presently, there is increasing demand to further develop the catamaran's planing and seakeeping characteristics so that it is more effectively applied in today's modern military and pleasure craft, and offshore industry supply vessels. Over the course of the past ten years, Vorus (1994,1996,1998,2000) has systematically conducted a series of research works on planing craft hydrodynamics. Based on Vorus' planing monohull theory, he has developed and implemented a first order nonlinear model for planing catamarans, embodied in the computer code CatSea. This model is currently applied in planing catamaran design. However, due to the greater complexity of the catamaran flow physics relative to the monohull, Vorus's (first order) catamaran model implemented some important approximations and simplifications which were not considered necessary in the monohull work. The research of this thesis is for relieving the initially implemented approximations in Vorus's first order planing catamaran theory, and further developing and extending the theory and application beyond that currently in use in CatSea. This has been achieved through a detailed theoretical analysis, algorithm development, and careful coding. The research result is a new, complete second order nonlinear hydrodynamic theory for planing catamarans. A detailed numerical comparison of the Vorus's first order nonlinear theory and the second order nonlinear theory developed here is carried out. The second order nonlinear theory and algorithms have been incorporated into a new catamaran design code (NewCat). A detailed mathematical formulation of the base first order CatSea theory, followed by the extended second order theory, is completely documented in this thesis. Advisors/Committee Members: Vorus, William, Wei, Dongming, Falzarano, Jeffrey.

Subjects/Keywords: vortex strength distribution; random wave; nonlinear wave; high speed jet flow; water jet; fast ship; vessel design; drag and resistance dynamic lift; high speed craft; Planing craft; planing boat; impact hydrodynamics; steady planing; seakeeping; slender body theory; time marching; singular integral; special function; ship motion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhou, Z. (2003). A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Orleans. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/28

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhou, Zhengquan. “A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Orleans. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/28.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhou, Zhengquan. “A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water.” 2003. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Zhou Z. A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Orleans; 2003. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/28.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhou Z. A Theory and Analysis of Planing Catamarans in Calm and Rough Water. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Orleans; 2003. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/28


University of New Orleans

2. Juckett, Sarah Eileen. Steady State and Transient Dynamical Systems Analysis of Uncoupled Roll Response for a Traditional Versus Advanced Hull Form.

Degree: MS, Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, 2006, University of New Orleans

The two ships represented in this thesis are dramatically different in design, but both exhibit similar properties such as length and breadth. The traditional hull form is represented by a typical flare-sided design with a forward reaching bow while the advanced hull form has a modified tumblehome and a truncated bow. The difference in shapes provides an interesting problem, comparing the roll responses for these two very different vessels while keeping certain shape parameters such as length, beam, and draft constant. Advisors/Committee Members: Falzarano, Jeffrey, Vorus, William, Birk, Lothar.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Juckett, S. E. (2006). Steady State and Transient Dynamical Systems Analysis of Uncoupled Roll Response for a Traditional Versus Advanced Hull Form. (Thesis). University of New Orleans. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/407

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Juckett, Sarah Eileen. “Steady State and Transient Dynamical Systems Analysis of Uncoupled Roll Response for a Traditional Versus Advanced Hull Form.” 2006. Thesis, University of New Orleans. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/407.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Juckett, Sarah Eileen. “Steady State and Transient Dynamical Systems Analysis of Uncoupled Roll Response for a Traditional Versus Advanced Hull Form.” 2006. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Juckett SE. Steady State and Transient Dynamical Systems Analysis of Uncoupled Roll Response for a Traditional Versus Advanced Hull Form. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Orleans; 2006. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/407.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Juckett SE. Steady State and Transient Dynamical Systems Analysis of Uncoupled Roll Response for a Traditional Versus Advanced Hull Form. [Thesis]. University of New Orleans; 2006. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/407

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of New Orleans

3. Vishnubhotla, Srinivas. A New Method to Predict Vessel Capsizing in a Realistic Seaway.

Degree: PhD, Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, 2007, University of New Orleans

A recently developed approach, in the area of nonlinear oscillations, is used to analyze the single degree of freedom equation of motion of a oating unit (such as a ship) about a critical axis (such as roll). This method makes use of a closed form analytic solution, exact upto the rst order, and takes into account the the complete unperturbed (no damping or forcing) dynamics. Using this method very-large-amplitude nonlinear vessel motion in a random seaway can be analysed with techniques similar to those used to analyse nonlinear vessel motions in a regular (periodic) or random seaway. The practical result being that dynamic capsizing studies can be undertaken considering the shortterm irregularity of the design seaway. The capsize risk associated with operation in a given sea state can be evaluated during the design stage or when an operating area change is being considered. Moreover, this technique can also be used to guide physical model tests or computer simulation studies to focus on critical vessel and environmental conditions which may result in dangerously large motion amplitudes. Extensive comparitive results are included to demonstrate the practical usefulness of this approach. The results are in the form of solution orbits which lie in the stable or unstable manifolds and are then projected onto the phase plane. Advisors/Committee Members: Falzarano, Jeffrey M., Birk, Lothar, Akyuzlu, Kazim.

Subjects/Keywords: nonlinear ship/platform motions; ship capsize; dynamical perturbation; random beam seas; large amplitude ship rolling; stable and unstable manifolds

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vishnubhotla, S. (2007). A New Method to Predict Vessel Capsizing in a Realistic Seaway. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Orleans. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/588

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vishnubhotla, Srinivas. “A New Method to Predict Vessel Capsizing in a Realistic Seaway.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Orleans. Accessed May 08, 2021. https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/588.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vishnubhotla, Srinivas. “A New Method to Predict Vessel Capsizing in a Realistic Seaway.” 2007. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Vishnubhotla S. A New Method to Predict Vessel Capsizing in a Realistic Seaway. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Orleans; 2007. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/588.

Council of Science Editors:

Vishnubhotla S. A New Method to Predict Vessel Capsizing in a Realistic Seaway. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Orleans; 2007. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/588

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