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You searched for +publisher:"University of New Orleans" +contributor:("Bryant, Earle V."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New Orleans

1. Mosley, Matthew. The Feminine Representation of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois in Langston Hughes' Not Without Laughter.

Degree: MA, English, 2010, University of New Orleans

Langston Hughes' novel Not Without Laughter works within the historically narrow framework of African American uplift ideology. Hughes implies Booker T. Washington's racial uplift ideology from Up From Slavery within Aunt Hager Williams. In addition, Hughes implies W.E.B. DuBois' racial uplift ideology from Souls of Black Folk within Tempy Siles. In both characters, he criticizes the ideologies. In addition, the ideologies work toward an initial construction of masculinity for Sandy, the protagonist, and ultimately undermine an argument for gender equality. Advisors/Committee Members: Bryant, Earle V., Lackey, Kris, Steeby, Elizabeth.

Subjects/Keywords: race; African American; Langston Hughes; uplift; masculinity; gender; blues; DuBois; Washington; Souls of Black Folk; Up from Slavery; Harlem Renaissance; middle-class; ideology; bourgeois

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mosley, M. (2010). The Feminine Representation of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois in Langston Hughes' Not Without Laughter. (Thesis). University of New Orleans. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/1176

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mosley, Matthew. “The Feminine Representation of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois in Langston Hughes' Not Without Laughter.” 2010. Thesis, University of New Orleans. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/1176.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mosley, Matthew. “The Feminine Representation of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois in Langston Hughes' Not Without Laughter.” 2010. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Mosley M. The Feminine Representation of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois in Langston Hughes' Not Without Laughter. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Orleans; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/1176.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mosley M. The Feminine Representation of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois in Langston Hughes' Not Without Laughter. [Thesis]. University of New Orleans; 2010. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/1176

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of New Orleans

2. Rawat, Shagun. The Journey to Manhood in Gaines' Bloodline.

Degree: MA, English, 2011, University of New Orleans

Ernest Gaines collection of five short stories Bloodline, (1968) depicts the effects of racism and its denigrating effects on the lives of the black men. Gaines use of animal imagery furthers the effects of racism on the psychology of the blacks. The resolution comes around in the form of a mentor who helps the protagonists to break through the debilitating mind-set and work towards a new self-identity no longer defined by the white man. Gaines articulates the effects of lack of maturity, responsibility and understanding on the lives of the protagonists, their families and the community as a whole. Gaines brings out the new avatar of the black man who in his self-actualized journey arrives at an understanding of nurturing, caring and contributing to the community. It marks both the culmination and a beginning of true manhood in the lives of his central characters. Advisors/Committee Members: Bryant, Earle V, Doll, Daniel, Boyd Rioux, Anne.

Subjects/Keywords: Racial denigration; animalistic state; maturity; nurturing; self-identity; manhood

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rawat, S. (2011). The Journey to Manhood in Gaines' Bloodline. (Thesis). University of New Orleans. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/1341

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rawat, Shagun. “The Journey to Manhood in Gaines' Bloodline.” 2011. Thesis, University of New Orleans. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/1341.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rawat, Shagun. “The Journey to Manhood in Gaines' Bloodline.” 2011. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Rawat S. The Journey to Manhood in Gaines' Bloodline. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Orleans; 2011. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/1341.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rawat S. The Journey to Manhood in Gaines' Bloodline. [Thesis]. University of New Orleans; 2011. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/1341

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of New Orleans

3. Bailly, Sarah. Names, Violence, and the African American Vernacular in Richard Wright's The Outsider.

Degree: MA, English, 2009, University of New Orleans

An analysis of the names and violence in Richard Wright's The Outsider reveals Wright's aesthetic program for the novel. Wright's recurring themes and the meanings of the name and aliases of his protagonist are indicative of African American vernacular tradition. Despite Wright's physical distance from African American life in the United States at the time of the novel's writing, he still conveys a strong connection to the African American experience, linking that experience with the suffering of all oppressed people. By using the idea of double-consciousness and various forms of signification, including masking, naming, and improvisation, Wright locates his work within the African American folk tradition and celebrates the freedom and subversive nature of African American expression. Advisors/Committee Members: Bryant, Earle V., Cooke, John, Osundare, Niyi.

Subjects/Keywords: Richard Wright; ”The Outsider”; African American Vernacular; Jazz; improvisation; masking; trickster figure; naming; violence; French Existentialism; Cross Damon; double-consciousness

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bailly, S. (2009). Names, Violence, and the African American Vernacular in Richard Wright's The Outsider. (Thesis). University of New Orleans. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/940

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bailly, Sarah. “Names, Violence, and the African American Vernacular in Richard Wright's The Outsider.” 2009. Thesis, University of New Orleans. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/940.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bailly, Sarah. “Names, Violence, and the African American Vernacular in Richard Wright's The Outsider.” 2009. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Bailly S. Names, Violence, and the African American Vernacular in Richard Wright's The Outsider. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of New Orleans; 2009. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/940.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bailly S. Names, Violence, and the African American Vernacular in Richard Wright's The Outsider. [Thesis]. University of New Orleans; 2009. Available from: https://scholarworks.uno.edu/td/940

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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