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You searched for +publisher:"University of New Mexico" +contributor:("Oshima, Lynette"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of New Mexico

1. Smith, Frederick. DOES IT COMPUTE?: A STUDY OF THE LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT.

Degree: Language, Literacy, and Sociocultural Studies, 2012, University of New Mexico

Research on professional development for teachers usually focuses on its effects during or immediately after the experience or on teachers satisfaction with professional development in general. Little research focuses on the lasting impressions and influences. This qualitative study used two focus groups to gather the memories of eleven teachers who became trainers in a high quality and voluntary professional development program ten years prior to the study. The program focused on helping teachers infuse technology into their teaching and develop constructivist pedagogy and used a training of trainers model for widespread dissemination. Teachers responded to four questions about their memories of the experience, how they felt it changed their practice, the challenges and successes of being a trainer, and the impact of their participation on their careers. Focus groups were audio and video recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparison and coding to identify recurring and powerful themes. Participants revealed that they found the curriculum resources and opportunities for collaboration as the most memorable features of the program. Many also reported that they experienced somewhat fearful feelings at the outset of the program, but that these feelings abated in the ensuing three years of the program. All participants voiced their success as trainers and learned more about technology through taking on that role. Challenges were related to recruiting new teachers into the program and inadequate technological resources in their schools. All found the program an enhancement to their self-confidence, professional growth and career achievement.' Advisors/Committee Members: Pence, Lucretia, Keyes, Thomas, Oshima, Lynette, Napper-Owen, Gloria.

Subjects/Keywords: Career development  – Study and teaching; Follow-up in teacher training

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, F. (2012). DOES IT COMPUTE?: A STUDY OF THE LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1928/20822

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Frederick. “DOES IT COMPUTE?: A STUDY OF THE LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1928/20822.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Frederick. “DOES IT COMPUTE?: A STUDY OF THE LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT.” 2012. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Smith F. DOES IT COMPUTE?: A STUDY OF THE LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/20822.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith F. DOES IT COMPUTE?: A STUDY OF THE LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/20822


University of New Mexico

2. Ball, Diane. The Enduring Communities Project of Japanese American Experiences in New Mexico during World War II and Beyond: A Teachers Journey in Creating Meaningful Curriculum for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom.

Degree: Language, Literacy, and Sociocultural Studies, 2010, University of New Mexico

In 2006, the Japanese American National Museum funded a three year curriculum development project entitled Enduring Communities: Japanese Americans in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas and Utah. As a member of the team of teachers from New Mexico, I used this experience to study my process of developing meaningful content and pedagogy about Japanese American internment for U.S. History and Civics courses at the secondary level. History is full of stories involving characters, actions, events, artifacts and analysis by those within the experience and those studying the experience in an academic setting. Understanding the past means knowing how what happened was shaped by a multiplicity of factors including the lives of those affected then and now. Developing this kind of historical knowledge was transformative; ideas became more important than facts. For the student, it meant learning to analyze and synthesize information to expand their thinking beyond a single event. Civil liberties for example, could be examined through the lens of the Japanese American experience during World War II. Narrative inquiry provides a methodology to document as well as analyze this personal story of curriculum development. Using Clandinin and Connelleys (2000, 2002) three-dimensional narrative inquiry space, the study focused on the context of the experience, the temporality of locating events within a larger framework, story-telling and metaphor as a way to describe the experience, and the inclusion of different voices to explore point-of-view. Data included journal entries, primary sources, video tapes, readings of both historical and pedagogical materials, student work from field tests, and interviews with team members and museum personnel. The conclusions were that (1) teacher-driven curriculum development is an under-utilized process leading to effective instruction in the classroom, (2) teachers voices need to be included and valued within the field of curriculum development, (3) experiences like the Enduring Communities Project are invaluable professional development opportunities for teachers, and (4) the combination of research, pedagogy and time are crucial components of effective teaching. Future studies should explore the need for teacher-driven curriculum and study the connections between theorists, theory and practice in the secondary social studies classroom.' Advisors/Committee Members: Zancanella, Don, Oshima, Lynette, Mitchell, Rosalita, Pence, Lucretia.

Subjects/Keywords: Secondary Social Studies Curriculum; Curriculum Development; Social Studies; Narrative Inquiry; Reflection; Reflective Teacher Practice; Teacher-driven curriculum development

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ball, D. (2010). The Enduring Communities Project of Japanese American Experiences in New Mexico during World War II and Beyond: A Teachers Journey in Creating Meaningful Curriculum for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1928/10855

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ball, Diane. “The Enduring Communities Project of Japanese American Experiences in New Mexico during World War II and Beyond: A Teachers Journey in Creating Meaningful Curriculum for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1928/10855.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ball, Diane. “The Enduring Communities Project of Japanese American Experiences in New Mexico during World War II and Beyond: A Teachers Journey in Creating Meaningful Curriculum for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom.” 2010. Web. 18 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Ball D. The Enduring Communities Project of Japanese American Experiences in New Mexico during World War II and Beyond: A Teachers Journey in Creating Meaningful Curriculum for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2010. [cited 2019 Feb 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/10855.

Council of Science Editors:

Ball D. The Enduring Communities Project of Japanese American Experiences in New Mexico during World War II and Beyond: A Teachers Journey in Creating Meaningful Curriculum for the Secondary Social Studies Classroom. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/10855

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