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You searched for +publisher:"University of New Mexico" +contributor:("Meize-Grochowski, Robin"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New Mexico

1. Hernandez, Stephen. STIGMA AND BARRIERS TO ACCESSING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PERCEIVED BY AIR FORCE NURSING PERSONNEL.

Degree: College of Nursing, 2012, University of New Mexico

This descriptive study assessed stigma and barriers to accessing mental health services in a convenience sample (N = 211) of Air Force nursing personnel, including 111 officers, 98 enlisted, and 2 of unknown grade, to answer the following research questions: (1) What are the perceived levels of stigma and barriers to accessing mental health services for Air Force nursing personnel? and (2) Does military grade affect perceived levels of stigma and barriers to accessing mental health services for officer and enlisted Air Force nursing personnel? The hypotheses were that there would be no difference between officer and enlisted Air Force nursing personnel in perceived levels of both stigma and barriers to care associated with accessing mental health services. Participants completed a survey that included the Britt (2000) and Hoge et al. (2004) stigma scale and the Hoge et al. (2004) barriers to care scale. The stigma scales grand mean was 3.1 (α = .89; SD = 0.97), an average response of neither agree nor disagree. More than 50% of respondents agreed that Members of my unit might have less confidence in me and My unit leadership might treat me differently. The barriers to care scale's grand mean was 2.1, an average response of disagree. Scheduling an appointment was a barrier for approximately 20% of respondents. Approximately 40% of respondents agreed that difficulty getting time off from work for treatment was a barrier to care. Significant differences between officer and enlisted responses to stigma and barriers to care items were found; however, the effect sizes were small. Compared with enlisted personnel, officers were more likely to agree that accessing mental health services would be embarrassing, harm their career, or cause leaders to blame them for the problem (p ≤.03 for each comparison). The sample's proportion indicating agreement to the stigma scale items were within ranges previously reported by service members screening positive for a mental health disorder after a deployment. Because perceptions of stigma and barriers to accessing mental health services endure, military leadership must stress the benefits of early access to mental health services and pursue an aggressive anti-stigma campaign. Advisors/Committee Members: Parshall, Mark, Bedrick, Edward, Meize-Grochowski, Robin, Mendelson, Cindy.

Subjects/Keywords: Stigma; Air Force; Mental Health; Nurse; Barriers to Care; Military

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hernandez, S. (2012). STIGMA AND BARRIERS TO ACCESSING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PERCEIVED BY AIR FORCE NURSING PERSONNEL. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1928/21526

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hernandez, Stephen. “STIGMA AND BARRIERS TO ACCESSING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PERCEIVED BY AIR FORCE NURSING PERSONNEL.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed February 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1928/21526.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hernandez, Stephen. “STIGMA AND BARRIERS TO ACCESSING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PERCEIVED BY AIR FORCE NURSING PERSONNEL.” 2012. Web. 20 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Hernandez S. STIGMA AND BARRIERS TO ACCESSING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PERCEIVED BY AIR FORCE NURSING PERSONNEL. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/21526.

Council of Science Editors:

Hernandez S. STIGMA AND BARRIERS TO ACCESSING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PERCEIVED BY AIR FORCE NURSING PERSONNEL. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/21526


University of New Mexico

2. Saiki, Lori Sue. Midlife Urinary Incontinence and the Intimate Dyad.

Degree: College of Nursing, 2015, University of New Mexico

Urinary incontinence is a major health concern for midlife women, with demonstrated effects on self-concept, life-style, and sexual function. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of midlife female urinary incontinence on the intimate dyad from a chronic illness perspective. The Corbin and Strauss Collaborative Chronic Illness Trajectory Model identifies biographical and relationship work engaged in when coping with a chronic health condition in the context of an intimate relationship. The specific aims of this study were to explore potential associations among urinary incontinence symptom severity, relationship satisfaction, biographical work factors (self-esteem, body image, depression, anxiety), and relationship work factors (relational ethics, sexual quality of life, incontinence-related communication) for insights into the impact of female urinary incontinence on the intimate dyad. Community-based, purposive, snowball recruitment resulted in enrollment of 57 women and 43 partners who completed anonymous, mailed surveys. Quantitative data were collected through completion of established instruments chosen as operationalized measures of theoretically-derived concepts. Qualitative data were collected through open-ended questions. No significant associations were found between urinary incontinence symptom severity and relationship satisfaction, measures of biographical work, or measures of relationship work. Womens biographical variables and relationship variables demonstrated moderate to strong correlations with each other (with the exception of self-esteem and incontinence-related communication) and with relationship satisfaction. Partners' incontinence-related communication scores demonstrated moderate to strong correlations with all women's biographical measures and all partners' relationship measures. Regression analyses demonstrated significant, unique contributions of relational ethics, sexual quality of life, and women's depression to the variance in relationship satisfaction scores. Women's and partners' scores on measures of the intimate relationship were not significantly different. Word frequency and themes identified in answers to open-ended questions demonstrated that the most frequently reported concerns by women and partners who scored in the distressed category for relationship satisfaction were women's avoidance of intimacy and loss of spontaneity in shared activities. This study offers insights into the relative contributions of factors that may affect relationship satisfaction for couples coping with female urinary incontinence. Further research is needed to better understand interrelationships among biopsychosocial factors involved in urinary incontinence symptom management. Advisors/Committee Members: Meize-Grochowski, Robin, Tinkle, Melinda, Stuifbergen, Alexa, Rogers, Rebecca, Bedrick, Edward.

Subjects/Keywords: Corbin and Strauss Collaborative Chronic Illness Trajectory Model; dyadic analysis; female urinary incontinence; partners; psychosocial impact; relationship satisfaction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Saiki, L. S. (2015). Midlife Urinary Incontinence and the Intimate Dyad. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1928/30414

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Saiki, Lori Sue. “Midlife Urinary Incontinence and the Intimate Dyad.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed February 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1928/30414.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Saiki, Lori Sue. “Midlife Urinary Incontinence and the Intimate Dyad.” 2015. Web. 20 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Saiki LS. Midlife Urinary Incontinence and the Intimate Dyad. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/30414.

Council of Science Editors:

Saiki LS. Midlife Urinary Incontinence and the Intimate Dyad. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/30414


University of New Mexico

3. Brennaman, Laura H. BOARDING PATIENTS WHO REQUIRE INVOLUNTARY MENTAL HEALTH EXAMINATIONS IN FLORIDA.

Degree: College of Nursing, 2015, University of New Mexico

This study addressed the gaps in knowledge about psychiatric boarding with the aims of (a) determining the extent of psychiatric boarding in Florida hospitals for individuals meeting criteria for involuntary psychiatric examination and (b) explaining what health services system resources and individual patient determinants contribute to psychiatric boarding. Individuals who go to general hospital emergency departments (EDs) in need of involuntary mental health examinations sometimes must wait in EDs for admission to inpatient units because of the critical shortage of inpatient or crisis mental health services. The process of keeping patients in the ED who are waiting 4 hours or longer for admission to inpatient psychiatric facilities is called psychiatric boarding. Average boarding times in the limited studies about psychiatric boarding range from 24 hours to several days. These time frames all exceed the statutory maximum of 12 hours allowed by the Florida Mental Health Act. None of the published research about psychiatric boarding focused on individuals needing care under an involuntary status. The conceptual framework for this study was the health services utilization model. The first stage of the study identified hospitals for study site recruitment by examining a statewide individual visit level data set to identify hospitals in Florida with EDs that routinely have high numbers of patients who are transferred to psychiatric hospitals. Following a pilot of data collection procedures, in the second stage of the study, data collectors at the two study sites retrospectively reviewed the electronic health records (EHRs) of 85 randomly selected participants (total participants N = 170) who were ED patients requiring involuntary mental health examinations. Data collectors submitted deidentified participant clinical and demographic information to the primary investigator. Ninety percent of the participants in this study experienced psychiatric boarding. Nearly one-half of participants boarded longer than the 12-hour maximum allowed by Florida law. Two of every 11 participants waited longer than 24 hours before gaining access to a receiving facility authorized to perform the involuntary mental health examination. The study identified that some health services system factors contributed to the problem, but the specific factors remain unclear. The individual determinants found to be significantly associated with frequent and longer boarding were being male, increased age, being a Medicare beneficiary, not requiring medical treatments to stabilize an emergency medical condition, and being intoxicated. The information this study presented can assist state mental health policy makers in Florida to direct future research to enable the most appropriate allocation of limited mental health resources to provide appropriate receiving facility services across Florida. Advisors/Committee Members: Meize-Grochowski, Robin, Tinkle, Melinda, Kimball, Richard, Bedrick, Edward, Christy, Annette.

Subjects/Keywords: Mental illness; boarding; involuntary examination; emergency; psychiatric emergency; Nursing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brennaman, L. H. (2015). BOARDING PATIENTS WHO REQUIRE INVOLUNTARY MENTAL HEALTH EXAMINATIONS IN FLORIDA. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New Mexico. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1928/25768

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brennaman, Laura H. “BOARDING PATIENTS WHO REQUIRE INVOLUNTARY MENTAL HEALTH EXAMINATIONS IN FLORIDA.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New Mexico. Accessed February 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1928/25768.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brennaman, Laura H. “BOARDING PATIENTS WHO REQUIRE INVOLUNTARY MENTAL HEALTH EXAMINATIONS IN FLORIDA.” 2015. Web. 20 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Brennaman LH. BOARDING PATIENTS WHO REQUIRE INVOLUNTARY MENTAL HEALTH EXAMINATIONS IN FLORIDA. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/25768.

Council of Science Editors:

Brennaman LH. BOARDING PATIENTS WHO REQUIRE INVOLUNTARY MENTAL HEALTH EXAMINATIONS IN FLORIDA. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New Mexico; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1928/25768

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